PlasticWaste Labyrinth is a stunning look inside our plastic waste problem

July 20, 2017 by  
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Much of our trash is hidden from our daily lives, which is why design collective Luzinterruptus is shining the light on wastefulness in their latest environmental art installations. Located at the heart of Madrid’s popular tourist attraction Plaza Mayor, PlasticWaste Labyrinth is a massive maze constructed from the thousands of plastic bottles that had been consumed in and around the plaza in the past month. The Madrid City Council commissioned the installation, built in June for the fourth Centennial Celebration of Plaza Mayor within the “Four Seasons” city art program. The PlasticWaste Labyrinth design developed out of Luzinterruptus’ desire to create a large-scale interactive installation befitting the historical plaza. The giant plastic bottle maze is intentionally claustrophobic so as to make the public feel disoriented while exploring the intricate path and narrow passages flanked with three-meter-tall walls. Wrapped around the King Philip III statue, the 300-square-meter maze features corridors measuring 170 meters in length and takes three minutes to pace. “The idea was to graphically visualize the amount of plastic we generate in our daily lives which we don’t often recycle accordingly,” said Luzinterruptus. “As a consequence, all this plastic is dumped in nature and ends up floating in the ocean, forming huge plastic islands that are destroying the marine ecosystem and will not ever decompose. Bearing all this in mind, we thought it was paramount that the piece didn’t look friendly.” Related: Glowing circle made from thousands of recycled notebooks celebrate Bilbao’s book festival Around 15,000 plastic bottles, inserted with lights and placed in bags, were used for the walls of the PlasticWaste Labyrinth. The plastic bottles were collected from businesses surrounding the square as well as from local residents and visitors who could dispose of their plastic waste in two giant containers placed in the square. The maze was open day and night for four days. + Luzinterruptus Photography: Lola Martínez © 2017

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PlasticWaste Labyrinth is a stunning look inside our plastic waste problem

‘Global climate emergency’ declared after jet stream crosses equator

June 30, 2016 by  
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A prominent climate scientist has declared a “global climate emergency” after observing the jet stream in the Northern Hemisphere crossing the equator and mixing with the jet stream in the Southern Hemisphere. Paul Beckwith, a geography professor at the University of Ottawa, wrote in a blog post that this behavior is new and “indicates that climate system mayhem is ongoing.” If the merging of the jet streams continues, it could disrupt the seasons, threatening the food supply chain and causing “massive geopolitical unrest.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CKasUm77D0U In a YouTube video post , Beckwith explained that the warming Arctic from man-made climate change is slowing down the jet stream and making it waver. He pointed out a few spots where the jet streams have merged, pinpointing the exact time when they touched each other as June 27 at 11 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Beckwith said we’ve lost the separation between the Northern and Southern Hemisphere jet streams and that if the trend continues it could lead to the equalization of the entire global temperature, reducing seasonality. Related: The Arctic is greening and scientists confirm it’s due to human activity Beckwith was alerted to the development from a blog post by environmental writer Robert Scribbler, who wrote that this “weather weirding due to climate change” is something that “would absolutely not happen in a normal world. Something, that if it continues, basically threatens seasonal integrity.” Scribbler explained that the barrier between the two jet streams is what has generated the strong divide between Summer and Winter during the Holocene Climate Epoch. If the boundary is eroded, it could create what Scribbler described as a “death of Winter” scenario with “more Summer heat spilling over into the Winter zone and vice versa.” Both Scribbler and Beckwith agree that human civilization is not prepared to deal with this new climate trend. “There’s very strange things going on on planet Earth right now,” said Beckwith. “There’s very, very strange things going on with the jet streams which guide our weather patterns.” Via Raw Story Lead image via Paul Beckwith

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‘Global climate emergency’ declared after jet stream crosses equator

Ancient Mars could have been more like Earth than we thought

June 30, 2016 by  
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NASA’s racked up some thrilling new finds about Mars lately, and they’re at it again. The Curiosity Rover discovered manganese oxides on the red planet. The seemingly simple find actually has mind-boggling implications: ancient Mars could have been a lot more like Earth than we thought. During research in Mars’ Gale crater, in the Kimberley Region, the Curiosity Rover detected manganese oxides. Los Alamos National Laboratory planetary scientist Nina Lanza said said in a NASA press release , “Now we’re seeing manganese oxides on Mars, and we’re wondering how the heck these could have formed?” According to Lanza, on Earth, the process to make such manganese oxides involves either microbes or atmospheric oxygen . Related: NASA scientist thinks lasers could send a craft the distance to Mars in just 30 minutes Turns out microbes are probably out of the realm of possibility, at least based on research up to this point, but atmospheric oxygen is a strong possibility. That means Mars probably had a lot more oxygen in its atmosphere at one point. The Gale crater isn’t the only place where manganese was detected. NASA’s Opportunity rover also recently found ” high manganese deposits thousands of miles from Curiosity .” So what happened to all that Martian oxygen? Lanza said as Mars lost its magnetic field , the water once on the planet could have broken down. As the magnetic field fell apart, radiation may have split the water molecules into oxygen and hydrogen. Without much gravity , light hydrogen atoms escaped, but the planet retained the heavier oxygen atoms. The oxygen helped create the red dust for which Mars is known. That particular process doesn’t need much oxygen, but for manganese oxides to form, there would have had to be far more oxygen than we thought Mars had. Lanza said, “It’s hard to confirm whether this scenario for Martian atmospheric oxygen actually occurred. But it’s important to note that this idea represents a departure in our understanding for how planetary atmospheres might become oxygenated.” She’s the lead author on a paper published this month in Geophysical Research Letters . Several other scientists from the U.S., Canada, France, Denmark, and Sweden contributed to the research. Via Gizmodo Images via Wikimedia Commons and NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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Ancient Mars could have been more like Earth than we thought

Stunning Four Seasons House is a Small Wooden Retreat Tucked in the Heart of the Spanish Plains

February 3, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Stunning Four Seasons House is a Small Wooden Retreat Tucked in the Heart of the Spanish Plains Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , cantilevered terraces , Churtichaga + Quadra Salcedo , Four Seasons House , Madrid tiny home , minimalist architecture , Spanish architects , spanish architecture , timber wooden beams , tiny home , tiny home in Segovia        

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Stunning Four Seasons House is a Small Wooden Retreat Tucked in the Heart of the Spanish Plains

Foster+Partners’ ComCast Innovation and Technology Tower May be the Tallest LEED-Certified Building in the U.S.

January 16, 2014 by  
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Foster+Partners just unveiled the first renders of their 59-story ComCast Innovation and Technology Center, which will be erected right next to the company’s headquarters in Philadelphia. The 1,121-foot glass tower is expected to become the tallest LEED-certified building in the United States, and – with a budget of over $1,2 billion – it will be Pennsylvania’s largest private development ever. Read the rest of Foster+Partners’ ComCast Innovation and Technology Tower May be the Tallest LEED-Certified Building in the U.S. Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “Philadelphia architecture” , comcast , ComCast headquarters , ComCast Innovation and Technology Center , Foster+Partners , Foster+Partners Comcast , Four Seasons Hotel Philadelphia , Green Towers , leed certification , LEED certified towers        

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Foster+Partners’ ComCast Innovation and Technology Tower May be the Tallest LEED-Certified Building in the U.S.

Make New Layered Candles from Old Candle Wax

October 24, 2013 by  
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Love changing candle scents with the seasons, but hate the leftover wax? Blogger Liz Fourez has a simple solution for making new layered candles out of old ones.

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Make New Layered Candles from Old Candle Wax

The D*Haus is a House that Changes Shape to Accommodate Different Seasons

November 8, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of The D*Haus is a House that Changes Shape to Accommodate Different Seasons Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: a house that changes shape , architecture based on mathematics , architecture that accomodates the weather , architecture that moves , architecture that moves on rails , D*Haus , Daniel Woolfson , David Ben Grunberg , Henry Dudeny , london’s anise gallery , passive solar design

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The D*Haus is a House that Changes Shape to Accommodate Different Seasons

Pop-up ‘Centipede Cinema’ is Made With Locally-Sourced Cork From Portugal

November 8, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Pop-up ‘Centipede Cinema’ is Made With Locally-Sourced Cork From Portugal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2012 European Capital of Culture , Bartlett School of Architecture , Centipede Cinema , Colin Fournier , cork , eco design , green design , Guimarães , pop-up design , portugal , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials , UNESCO , Urban design , urban intervention

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Pop-up ‘Centipede Cinema’ is Made With Locally-Sourced Cork From Portugal

New Grocery Store Has More Bike Than Car Parking

October 14, 2010 by  
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Photo credit A.Streeter via flickr and Creative Commons.

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New Grocery Store Has More Bike Than Car Parking

Undulating Green-Roofed Hotel Opens in Norway

September 1, 2010 by  
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Read the rest of Undulating Green-Roofed Hotel Opens in Norway http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , eco hotel , green architecture , green design , green roof , hotel , JDS Architects , norway , stavanger , Sustainable Building , two seasons hotel

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Undulating Green-Roofed Hotel Opens in Norway

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