Wadden Sea World Heritage Center promises great views and research opportunities

February 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Wadden Sea World Heritage Center promises great views and research opportunities

The Wadden Sea, known for being the largest unbroken system of tidal flats and wetlands on Earth, stretches from Denmark and Germany through the Netherlands. Protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, these coastal wetlands merge with Lauwersmeer National Park to create a rare landscape met by the Dutch village of Lauwersoog. What started out as a favorite casting-off point for local fishermen has since become a popular tourist destination for visitors wanting to experience the iconic landscape. It is also where Danish firm Dorte Mandrup is rounding out its third project on the Wadden Sea, the Wadden Sea World Heritage Center. “The new Wadden Sea World Heritage Center pays homage to the historic maritime activity in Lauwersoog,” Dorte Mandrup explained. “At the same time, it presents a contemporary expression that enriches the diversity of the buildings in the area.” Along with this project located in the Netherlands , Dorte Mandrup is also the designer of the Wadden Sea Center in Denmark and the Trilateral Wadden Sea World Heritage Partnership Center in Germany. Related: Flowing marine research center inspired by tsunami waves Home to more than 10,000 species of plants and animals , including a range of endangered migratory birds, the ecosystems found inside this region are completely unique. It is also one of the only natural habitats in the Netherlands for native seals. “Drawing inspiration from the endless cycle of the tide, the gradual spiral-like incline — like the continuous rising and falling of the water surface — offers a stunning 360-degree view of the sea, the Lauwersmeer and the surrounding landscape as visitors ascend through the building,” the firm said. “It almost gives you the feeling of being one with the sea.”  Visiting guests will have a chance to enjoy the views and learn about the Wadden Sea environment at the center, which will also serve as a research hub for students and scientists. One of the most important conservation projects that will take place at the center will be the study and rehabilitation of local rescued seals. The seals will have a home on the second floor of the building, where a large underwater tank gives visitors the chance to view the animals from above and below. Water-based research will culminate in an outdoor field station and water garden that also serves as a viewing platform and recreation area for both researchers and visitors. Part research base, part museum, the Wadden Sea World Heritage Center will provide an important and delicate intersection for understanding and appreciation between humans and nature. + Dorte Mandrup Via ArchDaily Images via The Wadden Sea World Heritage Center and Dorte Mandrup

Read more here: 
Wadden Sea World Heritage Center promises great views and research opportunities

Drone operators disturbing wildlife incur fines and jail time in Scotland

September 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Drone operators disturbing wildlife incur fines and jail time in Scotland

The number of cases in Scotland involving drone interference with animals on nature reserves has increased, causing police and wildlife experts to become “increasingly concerned” for the welfare of the protected animals. While nature reserve managers and wildlife specialists are encouraging outsiders to watch and enjoy the environment and animals in the sanctuaries, mounting numbers of injuries caused to the creatures by drones are leading Scottish lawmakers to impose fines on or even arrest individuals caught disturbing the peace. Drones are being flown inconsiderately according to Andy Turner, wildlife crime officer with Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). “There have been several incidents involving drones disturbing seals at designated haul-out sites,” he said. Seals that have protective considerations during breeding season are having their pups crushed in these haul-out zones, where they tend to flee when scared into the water by drones. Related: Daan Roosegaarde reveals vision for air-purifying Smog Free Drones “Likewise, there have been anecdotal reports of drones being used to film seabird colonies and raptors,” Turner continued. “While the footage from drones in these circumstances can be very spectacular, the operator must be mindful of the effect on wildlife.” The interference with some birds , such as guillemots and razorbills, has “almost catastrophic” implications according to nature reserve coordinators RSPB Scotland . Drones that fly in too quickly cause birds to panic and dive headfirst into the cliffs or plummet into the sea. Ian Thompson, Head of Investigations at RSPB Scotland, had a message for wildlife observers. “Watch the animals. You will get a sign if you are causing them any stress, you’ll see from their behavior,” he warned. “You might see birds take flight or suddenly lift their heads and run off or walk off. If the birds start altering their behavior, that shows that you are disturbing them, and then it is time to move a drone away.” Fines for harassing wildlife in the nature reserves can cost disrespectful droners up to £5,000 (about $6,425 USD). Alternately, severe infractions can earn individuals up to a six-month sentence in a Scottish penitentiary. Officers of the U.K. National Wildlife Crime Unit are taking the disturbances very seriously, regardless of the perpetrator. “Irrespective of whether the offender is an egg collector, boat skipper or drone operator, the possible sentences are the same,” said PC Charlie Everitt of the crime unit. “It is therefore essential that drone operators understand the law, research the legal status and behavior of any wildlife they intend to film and obtain the necessary licences to keep on the right side of the law.” Via BBC Image via Joe Hayhurst

Read more here:
Drone operators disturbing wildlife incur fines and jail time in Scotland

Obama Administration Wants Arctic Seals on Endangered Species List

December 13, 2010 by  
Filed under Eco, Eco Tech

Comments Off on Obama Administration Wants Arctic Seals on Endangered Species List

The Obama administration has proposed adding six different subspecies of Arctic seals to the endangered species list because of the threat they’re facing from shrinking sea ice.  NOAA made the proposal for those seals to be listed as threatened on Friday, and if approved, the seals would be the second animals after polar bears listed for reasons purely caused by climate change. The listings include four subspecies of ringed seals found in the Arctic Basin and the North Atlantic and two subspecies of bearded seals found in the North Pacific (including Russia and Alaska).  Vanishing sea ice was the primary  given for all the seals. NOAA said that the changes to the seals’ habitats was a clear indication that climate change was occurring and that the listing will improve the odds for those animals.  The listing is open for public comment and has a year to be finalized

Read more: 
Obama Administration Wants Arctic Seals on Endangered Species List

Bad Behavior has blocked 1568 access attempts in the last 7 days.