This zero-emissions flying water car lets you ditch traffic and sail to work

May 4, 2018 by  
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Have you ever been stuck in traffic, wishing you had a faster way to get to your destination? Then check this out: The Bubble is a flying water car that can get you out of rush hour and onto a river, sea or lake for your commute. The water taxi, made by French company SeaBubbles , is silent, emits zero emissions and glides through the water without creating waves. The company tested its latest prototype on a lake in Geneva last month and is currently conducting a five-week trial in Paris. ? SeaBubbles wants to change transportation by lowering emissions and making trips quicker. According to the company, ditching roads and taking a water route could cut your commute in half in some cities. For instance, the company estimates that going from the Dubai Marina to downtown Dubai would take 43 minutes by car, but just 26 minutes in the Bubble. The company completed testing in Geneva this month, and The Bubble should be ready for pre-orders starting next month. The company hopes to launch in 50 cities within the next five years. Related: Flying water taxis are hitting the rivers of Paris this summer SeaBubbles first made waves last year when they announced plans to hit the water of Paris by mid-2018. Now, the company has revealed details about their new line, which includes a docking system and an app that will show users whether a Bubble taxi would save them time and allow them to order a ride. The dock is designed to further reduce transportation emissions by capturing solar, wind and water energy to charge up Bubbles between rides. If the thought of riding around on the waves makes you green around the gills, fear not. The vehicle rises out of the water once it reaches 7.5 mph, which eliminates sudden movements and that uncomfortable bobbing feeling that often leads to motion sickness. The Bubble can fit five people including the driver, although it will have autonomous capabilities. + SeaBubbles Via Autoblog

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This zero-emissions flying water car lets you ditch traffic and sail to work

Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia

May 4, 2018 by  
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A sleek and modern take on the Australian farm building has popped up in the coastal town of Gerringong. Atelier Andy Carson designed Escarpment House as a two-bed guesthouse on an east-west axis to make the most of ocean views to the south and pastoral views to the north. The building orientation and material choice were also guided by passive solar principles. Set on nearly 150 acres of pasture with dairy cows, the Escarpment House maintains a relatively low profile with a simple gabled form created in the likeness of the traditional metal shed dairy structures of the region. “The project utilizes north and south decks as ‘winter’ and ‘summer’ outdoor space to enable the occupants to use the building mass as sun or wind protection moving to each side as favored,” wrote the architects. “The site positioning offered a significant view towards the nearby dairy with the setting sun over the escarpment offering a unique user experience.” The two bedrooms are located on the home’s east end, while the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living space face the west. Related: Passive solar home stays naturally cool without AC in Australia Energy consumption is minimized through the regulation of light and views thanks to the west façade’s large operable panels that open or close with the touch of a button. Escarpment House also features extra-thick insulated walls and double-glazing . Supplementary solar power, rainwater harvesting with UV filtration and treatment, as well as on-site sewage treatment further reduce the home’s environmental impact. + Atelier Andy Carson Via ArchDaily Images © Michael Nicholson

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Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia

Mecanoo unveils greenery-filled social housing for Kaohsiung

May 4, 2018 by  
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Hot on the heels of their recently completed National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts, Dutch firm Mecanoo unveiled their competition-winning social housing designs for the southern Taiwan city. The mixed-use complex will offer 234 units of housing, green space, and publicly accessible programming. Located between a new green corridor and an existing neighborhood along the railway, the project will kick off a larger urban redevelopment scheme in Kaohsiung . The 307,850-square-foot Kaohsiung social housing project comprises two buildings flanking a new green space. Housing units, which vary between 269 and 807 square feet, will cater to a wide variety of users from students and young families to the elderly and people with disabilities. The ground floors of both buildings will be zoned for commercial use to engage the surroundings. The massing of the buildings is optimized to reduce solar heat gain inside the apartments. Related: Mecanoo designs gorgeous green-roofed train station for Kaohsiung The tallest building on the east houses the majority of the apartments and is topped with community facilities while the shorter west tower includes more public-facing facilities such as a senior day-care center. “Distributed in several floors and connected by green terraces , the Sky Park works as a social hub open to the public, which brings together residents and the local community,” said Mecanoo of the greenery-filled complex. White stucco will be applied to the facade that’s partially infilled with green and white ceramic tiles—a departure from the local norm where entire facades are typically covered in tile. + Mecanoo Via Architect Magazine Images via Mecanoo

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Mecanoo unveils greenery-filled social housing for Kaohsiung

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