The warmest ocean temperature in a century was just recorded in California

August 7, 2018 by  
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Researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have recorded the warmest sea surface temperature in more than a hundred years near a pier in San Diego. The Institute, affiliated with the University of California, San Diego, has been collecting data on sea surface temperatures at the Ellen Browning Scripps Memorial Pier since 1916. The 2018 level surpassed an unusual 1931 record by 0.2 degrees, coming in at a whopping 78.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Related: Ocean heatwaves have risen by more than 50% since 1925 According to a press release from Scripps , “the ocean region off Southern California has been experiencing anomalously warm temperatures for the past week, and other observational networks farther off the coast have reported record or near-record temperatures as well.” The continuous rise in temperature will have serious implications for sea life and marine ecosystems. For example, it could help create a toxic algae bloom, such as the one that spread along the north Pacific coast in 2014, altering the biodiversity of the area indefinitely. This bloom had a devastating impact on sea lions and other marine mammal groups, closed fisheries, and pushed species of jellyfish and stingrays further inward to shore, causing a perilous domino effect of altered food chains. In 2015, El Niño significantly altered water temperature levels off the coast of California . However, after such environmental phenomena, seawater temperatures are supposed to return to historical averages. This time, it never happened. “It really is weird,” explained Scripps research scientist Clarissa Anderson in an interview with NPR. “We have different records going back decades and while [our ocean water] temperature is tightly connected with the equator, we’re now seeing [temperatures] stabilize at the equator while temperatures in southern California keep going up.” According to researchers, the record temperature is yet another sign of the mounting effects of climate change . + Scripps Institute Via NPR

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The warmest ocean temperature in a century was just recorded in California

Hood River retreat boasts minimal environmental impact

August 7, 2018 by  
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Lovers of the Columbia River Gorge will swoon over this beautiful vacation retreat perched right on Neal Creek, just an hour outside Portland, Oregon. Designed by Portland -based practice Paul McKean Architecture to embrace the outdoors, this two-bedroom weekend getaway was crafted to maximize valley and water views while minimizing impact on the natural environment. The owners—both outdoor enthusiasts—sought an environmentally friendly home that they now serves as a vacation rental available for all to rent . To minimize site impact, Paul McKean Architecture raised the habitable part of the home to one full floor above grade, creating a top-heavy form with elevated views of the creek and treetop canopy. Set atop a concrete plinth, the second level is clad in horizontal planks of timber. “Their wooded two-acre parcel of land presented many unique challenges including wetlands, creek protection setbacks, and floodplain restrictions,” explains the architecture in a project statement. “Lifting the main space protects the house from potential flooding and brush fire damage while making way for a covered outdoor patio and much needed gear storage below. At the uppermost level, a future planted roof will replace the landscape lost to the building footprint and reduces heat gain to the interior spaces.” Related: Spend the night in this magical Hobbit House tucked into the Washington shire Completed in 2008 for a project budget of $185,000, the weekend retreat spans 960 square feet. However, full-height glazing and white walls give the home a more spacious feel than its size lets on. The two bedrooms include two queen beds, while two twin beds can be added to the hallway; the retreat can sleep a total of six people. The year-round nightly rate at the Neal Creek Retreat starts at $230. + Paul McKean Architecture Images by Stephen Tamiesie

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Hood River retreat boasts minimal environmental impact

Japan considers adopting daylight savings time for 2020 Summer Olympics

August 7, 2018 by  
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This summer’s deadly heatwaves in Japan  have caused government and Olympic officials to consider the benefits of adopting daylight savings time for the  2020 Summer Olympics to ensure athlete safety. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has ordered his ruling party to consider what impacts a two hour shift forward would have on the country after backlash on social media followed the announcement. Adopting daylight savings time would allow events such as the marathon to be scheduled in the cooler morning hours. Masa Takaya, spokesperson for the 2020 games, urged the time push, saying it would also “help protect the environment and realize a low-carbon society in Japan,” alongside other efforts to add more plant life and heat-inhibiting pavements in the city. Although the time shift would provide both energy-saving and safety measures in the face of climate change , many citizens are protesting that the change would result in longer working hours for them. This is not a light claim made by the Japanese labor force, as a 2017 report by BBC News revealed that most individuals in the nation clock in more than 80 hours of overtime each month. Related: Japan wants to make 2020 Olympic medals from recycled smartphones Japan has not used the daylight savings system since the U.S. Occupation following World War II from 1948 until 1952. The event, a sour subject for many Japanese, also impeded initiatives during the 1970s and early 2000s to return to the system in the hopes of conserving energy in the country. The 2020 Summer Olympics are set to be held in Tokyo from July 24 until August 9, 2020, followed by the Paralympics from August 25 until September 6. As these are typically the hottest months of the year and likely to become hotter with global warming , the decision to enforce daylights savings time in Japan weighs very precariously in the balance for now. + 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics Via Reuters and  The Japan Times Image via T-Mizo

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Japan considers adopting daylight savings time for 2020 Summer Olympics

The last time Earth was this hot was 125,000 years ago

January 23, 2017 by  
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Proving once more that climate change is a runaway problem, scientists just revealed that the earth is the hottest it’s been in 125,000 years. The last time global temperatures were this high, sea levels completely covered the land on which New Orleans currently sits. According to a new report in Science Magazine , today’s ocean surface temperatures are comparable to those dating back 125,000 years. Jeremy Hoffman and colleagues at Oregon State University studied chemical clues in 104 seafloor sediment samples taken from areas around the world. By comparing the samples, they were able to create a picture of what the climate actually looked like 125,000 years ago. Related; Scientists warn rapidly melting glacier in West Antarctica could cause serious global havoc Scientists regularly look to the last interglacial period to model how Earth’s rising temperature will affect sea levels. Sea levels rose 20 to 30 feet above their current levels, and the average global sea surface temperatures at that time were almost identical to the 1995 to 2014 average temperatures, according to the researchers. According to Science News, this new information will help scientists improve predictions about how our oceans will respond to climate change. + Science Magazine Via Science News Images via NPS Climate Change Response , Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade , and NASA

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The last time Earth was this hot was 125,000 years ago

Green-roofed visitor center blends into Quebecs lakeside landscape

January 23, 2017 by  
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This handsome timber building by the lake looks like a sumptuous holiday retreat, but rest assured it’s open to the public for all to enjoy. Canadian design studio Anne Carrier Architecture completed the visitor center in Quebec’s Mont Orford National Park and skillfully blends the building into the landscape using a black-stained facade and green roof . The building, known as the Bonnallie Services Center, is one of several design projects the architecture firm has completed for the national park. Located next the stunning Stukely Lake, the 430-square-meter Bonnallie Services Center embraces views of the lake and mountains beyond. The two-story building is partially embedded into the earth and is angled to maximize views and frame an outdoor amphitheater . Full-height glazing is installed on the second floor for panoramic viewing and opens up to a covered outdoor terrace with seating. Related: Visitor center disguised as a hill to welcome visitors to Denmark’s historic Kalø Castle Ruins The visitor center is clad in black-stained timber to make the building recede into the landscape. In contrast, the interior is dominated by pale cedar . In addition to a welcome center for visitors, the contemporary building comprises boat maintenance and storage facilities, kitchen, and gift shop. “Exterior and interior spaces are connected by a network of walkways, stairs, covered passages nooks that are inspired by the natural meandering of walking trails,” said the architects to Dezeen . + Anne Carrier Architecture Via Dezeen Images via Anne Carrier Architecture , by Stephane Groleau

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Green-roofed visitor center blends into Quebecs lakeside landscape

US National Climate Report Predicts Global Warming Will Continue to Bring Hazardous Flooding and Heatwaves

February 1, 2013 by  
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More extreme weather is predicted for the United States, according to a draft of the National Climate Report released by the Federal Advisory Committee. Heat waves, along with coastal and river flooding will continue to threaten the country’s environmental and economic systems, causing climate-related hazards. Read the rest of US National Climate Report Predicts Global Warming Will Continue to Bring Hazardous Flooding and Heatwaves Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon emissions , climate change and storms , climate change sea levels , climate-related hazards , environmental destruction , environmental destruction farming , global warming , us climate change , US extreme weather , US Federal Advisory Committee , US national climate report , US sea temperature

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US National Climate Report Predicts Global Warming Will Continue to Bring Hazardous Flooding and Heatwaves

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