Environmentalists want to sculpt an Arctic ice ‘Trumpmore’ to show climate change is real

May 2, 2018 by  
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Would the face of a certain climate change -denying president carved on an Arctic iceberg last for one thousand years — or melt? That’s the question an environmental group is asking. They aim to sculpt Donald Trump’s face in ice “to end the debate on climate change.” Environmental association Melting Ice aims to “build the biggest ice monument ever to test if climate change is real” with what they’re calling Project Trumpmore . Inspired partly by Trump’s alleged dream of having his face carved onto Mount Rushmore, Project Trumpmore aims to make his dream come true…but perhaps not in the way he’d like. They want to sculpt the president’s face on an iceberg with the anticipation the artwork would melt away. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); The plan is to build Trumpmore to match the size of the presidents on Mount Rushmore. Read more: http://projecttrumpmore.com/#s5 Posted by Project Trumpmore on  Wednesday, April 25, 2018 Related: ‘Trump Forest’ plants trees to offset the president’s climate ignorance Nicolas Prieto, Melting Ice chairman, said in a statement, “ Global warming is one of the most important issues and topics of today. There are still people who ponder whether it’s a real issue. We want to build the monument for all of us, so we can see how long the sculpture lasts before melting. Often people only believe something when they see it with their own eyes.” According to the statement, three young men “working in the creative field” are behind the project, hoping to create a concrete symbol with what they call their scientific art project. On their website, they said if they do reach the construction phase, they’d broadcast the process, estimated to take around four weeks, on a live feed. They said “a world-leading team of Finnish and Mongolian ice sculptors” would do the carving. There’s still a ways to go — the team estimates Project Trumpmore might cost 400,000 Euros, or over $478,000 if crafted responsibly. They said on their website they’ll work to minimize the carbon dioxide emissions generated from traveling and other work on Project Trumpmore, and are aiming to launch a crowdfunding campaign. They have yet to find a location for the giant face and ask if anyone knows of one to get in touch with them. You can find out more on the Project Trumpmore website . + Project Trumpmore Image via Project Trumpmore

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Environmentalists want to sculpt an Arctic ice ‘Trumpmore’ to show climate change is real

Amazing plant pods can grow more lettuce in a 1010 room than a farm can grow on 1/2 acre

May 2, 2018 by  
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Do you live in a tiny apartment and want to grow your own food ? Aggressively Organic has an answer. The Indiana-based company offers Micro Growth Chamber Systems that can grow more lettuce in a 10-by-10-foot room than an organic farm can grow on a half-acre. The systems use less water, too — a typical Aggressively Organic plant only requires watering once every few weeks. To feed the nearly 10 billion people that could be living on planet Earth by 2050, the Food and Agriculture Organization estimates food production globally will have to increase by 50 percent . The organization also said world hunger seems to be on the rise. Aggressively Organic seeks to tackle food insecurity one micro-garden at a time by giving people the tools they need to grow their own food – whether that’s in an office, dorm room or small studio apartment. Their growth systems are even suitable for people who lack gardening experience. Even cats can’t resist our delicious #BokChoy in our Micro Growth Systems. #hydroponics #AggressivelyOrganic A post shared by Aggressively Organic (@aggressivelyorganic) on Nov 7, 2017 at 7:31am PST Related: This hexagonal indoor farm grows more food in less space with 90% less water Aggressively Organic’s systems employ hydroponics in a simple form without filters or pumps. Their product consists of a foldable cardboard chamber, a liner, a coconut coir disc in which seeds are planted, reusable net cups to hold the plant, and a nutrient solution. There’s no electricity required, although growers can place their indoor gardens under a desk lamp if they can’t keep them in a windowsill. The system is extremely water efficient – it takes 25 gallons of water to grow a head of lettuce in the ground, but Aggressively Organic can produce the same amount of lettuce with 16 ounces of H2O. It’s really this simple to make a huge difference. Are you growing your own food yet? #AggressivelyOrganic A post shared by Aggressively Organic (@aggressivelyorganic) on Nov 8, 2017 at 4:42pm PST Aggressively Organic is currently manufacturing their systems and plan to begin a “Beta 2” round of orders this month. The company will offer different options of its Micro Growth Chamber Systems: a nine pack, which includes nine systems, 108 refills of seeds of your choosing and a grow light for $119; a six pack, with 72 refills and a grow light for $92; or a three pack, with 36 refills and a grow light for $74. Learn more on the Aggressively Organic website . + Aggressively Organic Images courtesy of Aggressively Organic

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Amazing plant pods can grow more lettuce in a 1010 room than a farm can grow on 1/2 acre

Spectacular aerial sculpture hovers above a Madrid plaza

February 20, 2018 by  
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A symphony of color has taken to the air above Plaza Mayor. The instantly recognizable aerial sculpture is the work of none other than American artist Janet Echelman , who the City of Madrid commissioned to help celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Plaza Mayor. Titled 1.78 Madrid, the sculpture “explores the cycle of time” and the far-reaching effects of natural phenomenon and the built environment on our lives. Unveiled February 9 this year, 1.78 Madrid was displayed for a 10-day celebratory event that concluded yesterday. Highly engineered colorful fibers 15 times stronger than steel by weight were braided, knotted, and spliced together to create a dynamic form that constantly changes in the wind and provides a soft counterpoint to Plaza Mayor’s hard edges. At night, the sculpture was illuminated with colored lights. 1.78 Madrid is the latest addition to Echelman’s Earth Time Series that began in 2010 with works exhibited across the world. According to project statement on Echelman’s website, the number “1.78” within the title “refers to the number of microseconds that the day was shortened when a single physical event shifted the earth’s mass, thus speeding up the planet’s rotation of one day,” however it’s not clear what specific event the “1.78” alludes to. In Echelman’s previous works titled “1.8,” the number was a reference to how the 2011 Tohoku earthquake shortened the length of the day by 1.8 microseconds. Regardless, the cycles of time and causality are explored in all her works. Related: Janet Echelman’s dazzling aerial sculpture maps the devastating power of an earthquake “The artwork reminds us of our complex interconnectedness with larger cycles of time and the systems of our physical world,” continues the project statement. “The sculpture’s materials embody this. When any one element in the sculpture’s network moves, every other element is affected. Our surroundings affect how we feel and how we experience our lives – we are responsible for the way our cities look and function.” + Janet Echelman Images via Janet Echelman , by João Ferrand

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Spectacular aerial sculpture hovers above a Madrid plaza

Climate change art illustrates sea level rise in Venice during COP 23

November 9, 2017 by  
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Artist Andreco has unveiled his latest art installation, Climate 04-Sea Level Rise in Venice, to raise awareness of the climate change conference COP 23 currently underway in Bonn, Germany. Introduced as a project promoting dialogue between the arts and sciences, the climate change-inspired installation calls attention to the effects of potential sea level rise in Venice. The site-specific project consists of three parts: a wall mural, a sculpture, and an academic conference. Climate 04-Sea Level Rise is the fourth iteration of Andreco’s ongoing Climate project, started in Paris in November 2015 during COP 21 . For each conference since, the artist has realized various site-specific installations that take inspiration from recent scientific research and estimates in climate studies. From the introduction of the new installation: “Andreco’s aim for this project is to underline the weaknesses of the territory where his interventions will take place. While in Bari the main theme was the accelerating desertification caused by the rising temperatures, in Venice the artist’s focus is the sea level rise.” Related: Almost 200 countries gather at COP23 to accelerate climate action Andreco’s interventions in Venice begins with a giant mural , located next to Canal Grande in Fondamenta Santa Lucia, that represents his artistic interpretation about estimates and data regarding sea level rise in the Italian city. The mural is made of long curvaceous blue lines, punctuated by equations and mathematical symbols, mimicking waves that rise high above a person’s height. A crystalline steel sculpture to the side contains native coastal plants that speak to the importance of the landscape in combating storm surges. The last part of the intervention was a series of talks by international researchers held to stimulate public discussion about climate change. + Andreco

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Climate change art illustrates sea level rise in Venice during COP 23

Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

August 1, 2017 by  
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From a melting house to a floating building, British artist Alex Chinneck has a knack for turning heads—and his latest work is no exception. For his first permanent artwork, Chinneck created an enormous crack down the side of the building in an optical illusion called “Six pins and half a dozen needles.” Created with a group of engineers, steelworkers, and brick-makers, this monumental artwork at Assembly London is officially unveiled to the public today, August 1. Commissioned by AXA Investment Managers – Real Assets , the surrealist Six pins and half a dozen needles artwork is located at Assembly London , a major mixed-use campus on a site that previously housed publishing facilities. Chinneck references the publishing industry in his design, which resembles a torn sheet of paper. “The work was conceived to engage people in a fun and uplifting way,” said Chinneck. “Although we use real brick , it was designed with a cartoon-like quality to give the sculpture an endearing artifice and playful personality. I set out to create accessible artworks and I sincerely hope this becomes a popular landmark for London and positive experience for Londoners. Following 14-months of development, this represents my studio’s first permanent project and we are excited to be working on more. Forthcoming artworks include a trail of four sculptures with a combined height of 163-metres that will be constructed from over 100,000 bricks.” Related: Alex Chinneck Builds a Wax House in London Just to Watch it Melt Six pins and half a dozen needles is constructed from 4,000 bricks and over 1,000 stainless steel components. A crane was used to carefully position the artwork in place at 20 meters above ground level. The installation leans against a concrete facade and weighs approximately ten-tonnes. + Alex Chinneck Images by Charles Emerson

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Alex Chinnecks mesmerizing crack on a brick building turns heads in London

Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

June 27, 2017 by  
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Bionics, art, and public space merge in NAWA, a striking sculpture designed by Oskar Zi?ta of Zieta Prozessdesign for the European Capital of Culture 2016 celebrations. Created to match the celebrations’ slogan of “metamorphoses of culture,” this ultralight mirrored installation changes it appearance, which differs depending on where viewers stand and the time of day. The unveiling of the avante-garde sculpture on Daliowa Island of Wroc?aw in western Poland will take place on June 30, 2017. Inspired by bionic shapes, the 100-square-meter NAWA comprises 35 steel arches of varying sizes to create an openwork gate through which people can walk. The polished steel arches reflect the changing surroundings, thus giving the sculpture a continually changing appearance. The choice of arches is also a reference to the nearby landmarks including the Ossolineum, the church’s tower at Piasek, Wroclaw Market Hall, and Ostrów Tumski. “NAWA opens another chapter in the history of the Daliowa Island, returning it to the dwellers of Wroclaw,” wrote Zieta Prozessdesign. “The space is currently being revitalized and very soon will serve the city, becoming a bustling, open space for meetings, concerts and artistic events. Sculpture along with planned vegetation will create a consistent organic unity, emerging naturally from the river. At the same time, the realization will fit perfectly into the architectural order of the area and its vibrant life, full of tourists and passers-by.” Related: Tiny Mirrored Cabin Reflects the Ontario Landscape NAWA is ultra-lightweight thanks to FiDU, an innovative technology developed by Zieta Prozessdesign that distorts welded steel with compressed air. Almost 52 tonnes of steel and a million cubic meters of air were used for the sculpture. In addition to the installation of NAWA, around 7,500 new plants will be seeded on Daliowa Island. + Zieta Prozessdesign

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Ultralight NAWA sculpture continually changes its appearance throughout the day

Street artist constructs gigantic geometric portraits with reclaimed wood

April 14, 2017 by  
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Belgian street artist Stefaan De Croock (a.k.a. Strook ) just unveiled a gigantic portrait made entirely out of reclaimed wood . Working with wood fragments of various shapes, sizes and colors, the artist created the enormous 30-foot-high portrait on the side of a high-rise for the Crystal Ship Arts Festival in Ostend, Belgium. The large art piece was created with reclaimed wood pieces sourced from old homes, studios, boats, and even a shipwreck. Using the wood’s original color palette and natural textures as a guide, the artist painstakingly created a beautiful female form. Related: Italian artist creates extraordinary sculptures out of reclaimed driftwood The artist and graphic designer is well-known for his creative street art and was commissioned this year by the arts festival to create a large-scale piece. Strook’s portrait is one of many art pieces on display by some 20 international and local artists who were invited to attend the festival. + Strook Via This is Colossal Photography by Sasha Bogojev for Arrested Motion

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Street artist constructs gigantic geometric portraits with reclaimed wood

Artist transforms discarded books into spectacular crystallized artifacts

January 6, 2017 by  
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San Francisco-based artist Alexis Arnold turns discarded books into sculpture in an attempt to immortalize some of our favorite literary classics. Created as part of her Crystalized Books series, the petrified objects speak to the rise of e-books and disappearance of independent bookstores. The books are carefully bent into dynamic and irregular shapes and covered with crystals to obscure their words, giving them the appearance of geologic specimens or forgotten historic artifacts. We’ve featured Arnold’s works before , but she’s recently produced many more of her eye-catching pieces. The artist makes her sculptures by adding borax to boiling water. She dips a book into the hot solution before bending back the book’s pages to the desired form. The borax-covered book is taken out and preserves its distorted shape as it cools, while the solution dries into chunky crystal growth. Related: Guy Laramee’s Carvings Prove that Books Can Transport Us to Incredible New Worlds The crystal growth obscures the text and turns the book into a nonfunctional art piece. Arnold sources discarded and found books , but she prefers to work with the literary classics or educational books such as ‘The Science of Wine’ and ‘Mastering the Art of Beekeeping.’ + Alexis Arnold Via Colossal Images via Alexis Arnold

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Artist transforms discarded books into spectacular crystallized artifacts

A rural Montana Farm is converted into spectacular outdoor art center called Tippet Rise

August 2, 2016 by  
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The main feature is Oliver’s Music Barn, designed by Gunnstock Timber Frames and Arup engineers and collaborating with the art center’s director, Alban Bassuet. A 150-set concert hall and visitor center are found underneath the wooden-clad, gabled roof. An open air venue, named Tiara, is also a central part of the project. The wooden roof , held up by abstractly angled columns, is mean to echo performances’ acoustics right back at the audience and the surrounding Beartooth Mountains serve as breathtaking scenery. Related: 6 new inspiring & sustainable museums you must see now Ensamble Studio was commissioned to create three architectural structures for the property. One of the structures, named Domo, is mean to represent an inverted mountain range, allowing guests to walk underneath stark peaks and intriguing caverns. Beartooth Portal and Inverted Portal, the other sculptures , incorporate two concrete formations leaning up against one another in a triangular fashion. Sculptures by Patrick Dougherty , Mark di Suvero and Stephen Talasnik , from the center’s permanent collection, are also featured. On loan from the Smithsonian Hirshorn Museum and Sculpture Garden are two works by Alexander Calder , Two Discs and The Stainless Stealer, which were originally created in the 1960s. Cathy and Peter Halstead, the center’s founders, stated, “After six years of planning and work and a lifetime of dreams, we are about to have the pure joy of opening Tippet Rise by adding the only element that’s still missing: the public.” Visitors are welcomed by geothermal hydrology systems and an upcoming 80,000 watt solar canopy to charge electric vehicles. +Tippet Rise Art Center Via Dezeen Images via  Iwan Baan

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A rural Montana Farm is converted into spectacular outdoor art center called Tippet Rise

DIY recycling machines will let anyone turn plastic waste into functional objects

April 8, 2016 by  
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Last year the world produced nearly 311 million tons of plastic, but less than 10% of that was recycled. The truth of the matter is that most plastic ends up in the wrong places; landfills, oceans, and inside animals. Precious Plastic has envisioned a new solution for our plastic problem, and it could make all the difference. The company, started by Dave Hakkens, a 27 year old Dutch designer, is developing resources for DIY machines that recycle plastic waste into functional objects. Released as a shared online open source, the machines can be made with basic tools and universally available materials. The company plans to provide a series of detailed instructional videos and a download-kit, allowing people to become craftsmen of plastic right at home, from anywhere in the world. Check out the video below to see how this revolutionary machine could clean up our planet. + Precious Plastic The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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DIY recycling machines will let anyone turn plastic waste into functional objects

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