Ancient beaver-like critter epitomizes lightning speed of evolution after dinosaurs went extinct

October 5, 2015 by  
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When you think about creatures that might survive an apocalypse event, you might think about cockroaches or some kind of armored lizard. A critter that is small and furry and, frankly, kind of cute isn’t what immediately comes to mind. Yet, after nearly 75 percent of the species on Earth were wiped out some 66 million years ago, that’s just what happened. This morning, scientists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln announced the discovery of a furry plant-eating mammal that lived just a few hundred thousand years after the dinosaurs went extinct. The three-foot-long animal had buck-toothed incisors, making it look a bit like the beavers we’re familiar with today. Read the rest of Ancient beaver-like critter epitomizes lightning speed of evolution after dinosaurs went extinct

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Researchers smuggle ancient seeds out of Syria to save agricultural heritage

September 22, 2015 by  
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A unique collection of seeds is safe from destruction in Syria after scientists managed to smuggle their precious cargo out of the country. Since 2012, scientists from The International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), located just outside of Aleppo, have been working to protect their seed bank. The bank holds one of the world’s most important seed collections, preserving ancient seeds as well as seeds from staple food crops, like wheat and barley. The researchers have managed to get 140,000 seed packets out of the country. Read the rest of Researchers smuggle ancient seeds out of Syria to save agricultural heritage

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Researchers smuggle ancient seeds out of Syria to save agricultural heritage

A tower of 3,000 tiny ceramic shops criticizes London’s crazed consumerism

September 22, 2015 by  
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New Oxford Study Reveals the Origins of HIV

October 7, 2014 by  
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A new study published in Science  has traced the origins of the HIV-1 group M pandemic to 1920s Kinshasa, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While strains of  HIV are known to have crossed from other primates to humans on a number of occasions, only this particular outbreak has led to a pandemic. Scientists have long wanted to know why this particular strain was able to spread so successfully, when others had petered out. An international team lead by scientists from Oxford University and the University of Leuven reconstructed and examined the genetic history of the virus. This led them to conclude that a “perfect storm” of social factors allowed the virus to break out of Kinshasa in the 1920s and spread around the world. Read the rest of New Oxford Study Reveals the Origins of HIV Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aids , contagious diseases , Democratic Republic of the Congo , DRC , epidemic , hiv , HIV originated in Kinshasa in 1920 , HIV transmission , Kinshasa , pandemic , sexually transmitted diseases , transmissible diseases , urban development

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Jet-Propelled Micro Engines Scrub Even the Nastiest Wastewater

December 20, 2013 by  
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It’s not easy to break down compounds such as mineral oils, paints, and organic solvents in wastewater , but a group from Germany believe they have found a way. To remove these tricky materials from the water supply, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart have invented tiny, jet-propelled micro engines to treat waste water. The mini engines take advantage of iron, platinum, and hydrogen peroxide to break pollutants down into carbon dioxide and water that is clean enough to use again. Read the rest of Jet-Propelled Micro Engines Scrub Even the Nastiest Wastewater Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: fenton’s reaction , germany , jet-propelled engines scrub wastewater , max plank institute for intelligent systems , microcleaners , microengines , microjets , micromotors , organic compounds , stuttgart , wastewater treatment , wastewater treatment solutions        

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Jet-Propelled Micro Engines Scrub Even the Nastiest Wastewater

Study Shows U.S Amphibians Disappearing at ‘Alarming and Rapid Rate’

May 30, 2013 by  
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Amphibians, with their permeable skin, delicate membranes, and semi-aquatic habitats, have long been considered to be bioindicators . These species are generally the first to feel environmental stresses and they can provide warning signs for the overall health of ecosystems; bad news for salamanders, frogs, newts, and toads means trouble for the rest of the web of life. A startling new study published in PLoS One by scientists from the US Geological Survey found that amphibians in the United States are disappearing so rapidly that they could vanish from half of their habitats in the next 20 years. The nine-year study found that endangered species are predicted to fare even worse and they could die off in as few as six years. Read the rest of Study Shows U.S Amphibians Disappearing at ‘Alarming and Rapid Rate’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: amphibians , bioindicator , decline , ecosystem , endangered species , michael adams , plos one , united states , us geological survey , usgs        

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Study Shows U.S Amphibians Disappearing at ‘Alarming and Rapid Rate’

World’s Lightest Solid Unveiled

December 8, 2011 by  
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A material that is 100 times lighter than styrofoam has been produced by scientists from the University of California, Irvine and the California Institute of Technology. The unnamed new material is made with nickel phosphorous in a nanoscale lattice. It is 99.99 percent air. This material is even lighter than silica aerogel , and weighs just 0.9mg per cubic centimeter. The announced plans for the material include use for battery electrodes and for acoustic- and vibration-dampening applications. But there will doubtless be other applications that other materials engineers will find for this material. The techniques used to fashion superlightweight materials may eventually be applicable for use with other materials. Even though there isn’t an immediate green tech application for this material doesn’t mean that it isn’t interesting. image credit: Dan Little, HRL Laboratories LLC via: Architect Magazine

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World’s Lightest Solid Unveiled

Hawaii Breeding Sea Urchins to Gobble Up Invasive Seaweed

February 4, 2011 by  
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Scientific American has a report on Hawaii’s use of sea urchins as a way to combat invasive seaweed in their coral reefs. By breeding sea urchins to boost numbers, they can act like goats on hillsides, keeping the weeds mowed

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Hawaii Breeding Sea Urchins to Gobble Up Invasive Seaweed

New BP Spill Analysis Reveals that 185 Million Gallons of Oil have Leaked

September 24, 2010 by  
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Photo: BP BP Oil Spill Post-Mortem A team of U.S. scientists from Columbia University has just published a paper about a review of video footage from the BP oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico last Spring and Summer. Using a technique called “optical plume velocimetry” and other analysis techniques, they were able to estimate how much oil escaped the Macondo well between April 20th and the moment the leak was plugged on July 15th (with final confirmation that the well was stable only on Sept..

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New BP Spill Analysis Reveals that 185 Million Gallons of Oil have Leaked

Experts Advocate International Geo-enineering Research and Governance

January 31, 2010 by  
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Image: Clouds Seeded Over Las Vegas Flickr, Saschapohflepp In an opinion piece in the Jan. 27 online issue of Nature (paid content), scientists from Canada and the United States argue that internationally coordinated research and controlled field-testing of geo-engineering options to block the sun should start immediately

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Experts Advocate International Geo-enineering Research and Governance

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