UAE unveils plans for massive city simulating human settlement on Mars

September 27, 2017 by  
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The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has announced plans to build a 1.9-million-square-foot city that will simulate conditions for humans living on Mars . Mars Scientific City comprises the Emirate’s first step towards their ultimate goal of building a city on the red planet itself by 2117. The UAE Government unveiled plans for the Mars Scientific City at the first annual review of their plans for the future, according to The National. The project will cost 500 million United Arab Emirates Dirham, which is around $136.1 million. Inside the city, research laboratories will be set aside to investigate how future Mars colonists will produce everything from food and water to energy . Related: The UAE joins race to build first city on Mars Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE vice president, said the Mars Scientific City is an extraordinary national project and released some images on his Twitter page. From these pictures, it appears scientists could carry out research in the desert in large bio domes. In addition to research on Earth, the Emirates Mars Mission is working towards launching the Hope spacecraft in 2020. The spacecraft is set to arrive and begin orbiting Mars in 2021, in time for the UAE’s 50th anniversary. According to The National, the probe would be the first sent to Mars by a Muslim country. Earlier this year, the UAE unveiled their Mars 2117 plan and their goal of building the red planet’s first city within 100 years. They plan to conduct research for the Martian city with the help of an international scientific consortium. According to The National, the Mars Scientific City, as a specialist research city, could offer a first step towards Mars 2117 as scientists delve into how humans might survive in Mars’ harsh environment . Via The National Images via Dubai Media Office on Twitter

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UAE unveils plans for massive city simulating human settlement on Mars

New research shows plants respond to touch

May 31, 2016 by  
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Researchers have long speculated about whether plants are capable of interacting with humans and each other. In one study, it emerged they sometimes ‘talk’ to each other through the soil. Now scientists from the University of Western Australia (UWA) have discovered an intriguing new aspect of plant life: they appear to respond to touch. There’s no visible sign that plants respond to touch, according to the scientists, who recently released their research in the journal Plant Physiology . Instead, the researchers noticed how plant genes expressed themselves differently after being sprayed with water. The gene changes happened minutes after they were sprayed and only lasted for around half an hour. The scientists determined there were no ‘ active compounds ‘ that might trigger a change; demonstrating that the plants changed in response to their external environment . Related: Researchers believe trees may have their own living Internet Gene changes in the plants happened not only when they were sprayed with water, but when humans touched them with fingers or tweezers and even when shade fell across them. Lead researcher Olivier Van Aken said it could happen naturally when it rains, when the wind blows, or when a bug skitters across a plant. Van Aken said , “Although people generally assume plants don’t feel when they are being touched, this shows that they are actually very sensitive to it and can redirect gene expression, defense, and potentially their metabolism because of it.” Why might plants respond this way? It appears they may be protecting themselves or even adapting to environmental conditions , such as increased water or light. Van Aken said , “Unlike animals, plants are unable to run away from harmful conditions. Instead, plants appear to have developed intricate stress defense systems to sense their environment and help them detect danger and respond appropriately. The findings may cause us to think differently about our interactions with the plants around us. While plants don’t appear to complain when we pinch a flower , step on them, or just brush by them while going for a walk, they are fully aware of this contact and are rapidly responding to our treatment of them.” Via Motherboard Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

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New research shows plants respond to touch

Is this protein the key to an anti-aging pill?

April 11, 2016 by  
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From serums to plastic surgery to antioxidants, humans are continually trying to delay the inevitable aging process. Now researchers claim they may be one step closer to an anti-aging pill – and it all comes down to one little protein molecule. According to the team, a pill that limits the protein GSK-3 could increase the human lifespan by seven to ten years . Read the rest of Is this protein the key to an anti-aging pill?

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Is this protein the key to an anti-aging pill?

New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

August 31, 2015 by  
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How would the world look if humans had never spread out across the Earth? For a start, we’d have a lot more forest, much less pollution, and the stars would look unbelievably bright. But, as a new map shows, the planet would also be absolutely teeming with large mammals , from the Serengeti to Northern Europe and all the way across the Americas. Researchers at Denmark’s Aarhus University have created a global map which shows the distribution of large mammals as it may have been if humans had never left Africa. Read the rest of New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

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New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

Solar-powered Josey Pavilion beats wicked hot Texas summers without air-conditioning

August 31, 2015 by  
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Solar-powered Josey Pavilion beats wicked hot Texas summers without air-conditioning

Every Year 250,000 Horseshoe Crabs ‘Donate’ Their Blue Blood to Save Humans

July 24, 2014 by  
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Do you give much thought to horseshoe crabs? No, me neither. But it turns out that without them, we could be in a very precarious position. Horseshoe crabs – or to be more precise, their incredible, baby blue blood – are used to test for bacterial contamination, thus saving countless lives each year during medical procedures. The only trouble is, we have to catch a quarter of a million horseshoe crabs each year to do this, and then we have to drain their blood . Read the rest of Every Year 250,000 Horseshoe Crabs ‘Donate’ Their Blue Blood to Save Humans Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal testing , bacteria , bacterial contamination , biomedical research , biotech , blood , Carolina , fisheries , Horseshoe crab , horseshoe crab blood harvest , horseshoe crabs blue blood , LAL test , medical research , scientific research , surgical procedures

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Every Year 250,000 Horseshoe Crabs ‘Donate’ Their Blue Blood to Save Humans

Asia’s Wealthiest Man is Building the Cheapest Apartments in Hong Kong

July 24, 2014 by  
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In a stunning illustration if the ever-widening inequality gap, the richest man in China is currently building tiny apartments in Hong Kong for those city dwellers who can’t afford housing in the world’s most unaffordable city . Clocking in at just under 200 square feet, the apartments cost about $250,000 and rate as some of the cheapest in the entire city. Read the rest of Asia’s Wealthiest Man is Building the Cheapest Apartments in Hong Kong Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Hong Kong apartments , Hong Kong housing , Hong Kong income inequality , hong kong micro-apartments , Hong Kong real estate , Hong Kong tiny apartments , income gap , income inequality , micro apartments , micro apartments China , Mont Vert , Mont Vert apartment , Mont Vert micro apartment , pay gap , richest man in Asia , tiny apartments China

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Asia’s Wealthiest Man is Building the Cheapest Apartments in Hong Kong

Harvard Researchers Successfully Reverse Aging In Mice

December 23, 2013 by  
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  Photo © Shutterstock In a new study published in the journal Cell , Harvard researchers claim to have discovered a new compound that can revive old cells in mice and make them act “young” again. The chemical, called NAD, is found naturally in mouse — and human — bodies, but is gradually depleted from cells as they age. By increasing the amount of NAD in tissue from a 2-year-old mouse, the scientists were actually able to “trick” the cells into acting like those from a 6-month-old animal, the equivalent of a 60-year-old human’s cells becoming like a 20-year-old’s. Read the rest of Harvard Researchers Successfully Reverse Aging In Mice Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: aging , aging in mice , aging process , animal testing , anti-aging supplement , cellular immortality , extending life , harvard medical school , medical research , NAD chemical , scientific research        

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Harvard Researchers Successfully Reverse Aging In Mice

New Study Shows that Anti-Anxiety Meds in Waterways Alter Wild Fish Behavior

February 15, 2013 by  
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Photo via Shutterstock A new study has shown that pharmaceutical drugs polluting the world’s waterways may significantly change the behavior of wild fish . A study of wild perch found that the presence of a widely prescribed anti-anxiety medication called oxazepam makes the fish more mellow but also more antisocial and vulnerable to predators—which could have a notable ecological impact. Read the rest of New Study Shows that Anti-Anxiety Meds in Waterways Alter Wild Fish Behavior Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: clean water , environmental destruction , fish behavior study , marine life destruction , oxazepam fish , pharmaceuticals waterways , scientific research , Umeå University , wastewater pharmaceuticals , water pollution , wild fish study

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New Study Shows that Anti-Anxiety Meds in Waterways Alter Wild Fish Behavior

Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2013 by  
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Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) have used nanotechnology to make the world’s smallest Cupid for Valentine’s Day ! The teeny cupid is made from carbon nanotubes coated with metals and other materials. Just a few hundred nanometers from foot to bow, the tiny cupid is an example of big technology. Read the rest of Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Brigham Young University (BYU) , carbon nanotubes , Nano-Cupid , nanofilters , nanomaterials , nanotechnology , nanotubes , scientific research , Utah Innovation Awards , valentine’s day , Valentine’s Day Nano-Cupid

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Brigham Young University Scientists Create a Tiny Nano-Cupid For Valentine’s Day

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