Kuehn Malvezzi tops a brick office building in Germany with an energy-efficient greenhouse

December 23, 2019 by  
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In the historic center of Oberhausen, Berlin-based architectural firm Kuehn Malvezzi has created a job center topped with a greenhouse in an unprecedented example of “building-integrated agriculture” in Germany. Named Altmarktgarten Oberhausen, the mixed-use facility symbolizes old and new: the brick-and-steel material palette references the area’s historic architecture, while the greenhouse serves as a place for innovative urban farming research. For a reduced environmental footprint, the architects installed systems for recycling rainwater, gray water and waste heat from the building operations. Created in collaboration with landscape architects atelier le balto and awarded the winner in a 2016 architecture competition, the mixed-use facility was constructed on the site of an old market hall at Oberhausen’s Altmarkt. The first five stories of the building function as a job center, while the top floor and rooftop greenhouse are used by the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental Safety and Energy Technology (UMSICHT). An interior courtyard with a vertical garden helps visually connect the sawtooth-roofed greenhouse with the brick building below. The vertical garden — which comprises hardy climbing plants, like the crimson glory vine and common hop, on a galvanized steel structure — are complemented with a bed of small shrubs and ground cover plantings. Related: A “floating” greenhouse is inserted behind a renovated Belgian home “The building, designed by Kuehn Malvezzi, blends confidently but calmly into the historical city,” the architects said. “The specificity of this important urban location results from the tension between the physicality of the brick building and the filigree lightness of the rooftop greenhouse planned in cooperation with Haas Architekten. From the regularity of its structure, the greenhouse on each of the three sides of the street forms its own conclusion, which responds sensitively to each context.” To access the greenhouse, visitors are led from a lime tree-lined market square, past the courtyard with the vertical garden and up a steel staircase to the roof. Operated by the municipality, the publicly accessible greenhouse overlooks views of Oberhausen’s historic center and the city beyond. + Kuehn Malvezzi Photography by Hiepler Brunier via Kuehn Malvezzi

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Kuehn Malvezzi tops a brick office building in Germany with an energy-efficient greenhouse

Community-oriented housing redefines a former industrial site in west London

November 15, 2019 by  
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London-based architectural firm Mæ has completed the second phase of Brentford Lock West, a urban regeneration masterplan that is providing quality homes — 40 percent of which are designated for shared ownership — designed to engage the waterfront environment and community. Taking inspiration from the site’s industrial past, the architecture complements its historic setting with distinctive sawtooth roofs that help funnel light into the buildings and the material palette of blond brick, in-situ concrete and reconstituted stone. In addition to designing for optimal daylighting, the architects have included mechanical ventilation heat recovery systems and high levels of thermal insulation to ensure energy efficiency . Completed at the end of 2018, the second phase of Brentford Lock West introduces an additional 157 homes to the mixed-use masterplan and includes a combination of lateral apartments, duplexes, penthouses and townhouses. All homes are “step-free” and follow the Lifetime Home Standard , a set of design principles that emphasize inclusivity, accessibility, adaptability, sustainability and good value. Each home is carefully oriented to maximize privacy as well as views, whether of the canal to the north or the city to the south. Related: RRA unveils mountain-inspired ski resort that emphasizes nature and community In designing the development, the architects worked with the local community and other stakeholders. As a result, community values have been embedded into the design of Brentford Lock West. One such example is the new “neighborhood street” — a shared space for pedestrians and cyclists that is landscaped and paved with herringbone brick — that knits the two phases together. Also at the heart of the development is a landscaped communal garden. Large cantilevered balconies engage the street below. “Continuing the architectural language of phase one, the second phase builds upon scale and massing, alongside the benchmark it set in terms of quality and sense of place,” the architecture firm added. “Holding the corners of each plot, six pavilion buildings are linked through rows of private townhouses and bridge structures that form entrance portals and house further accommodation above.” + Mæ Images via Goodfellow Communications

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Desmond Tutu Clinic welcomes HIV patients with a striking sawtooth roof

June 12, 2019 by  
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In the Cape Town township of Masiphumelele, approximately 30 percent of the residents are infected with HIV. To help the low-income community, South African architectural practice theMAAK partnered with the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation (DTHF) to build a striking new public building to serve the area. Topped with a sawtooth roof, the humanitarian structure sports a dynamic facade that puts forth a confident and welcoming face for the DTHF. Located next to Masiphumelele High School, the recently completed Desmond Tutu Clinic spans nearly 5,400 square feet and is one of several clinics that the DTHF has built in communities around South Africa. The clinic not only serves as a new home for the Foundation’s industry-leading medical work, but also takes the social needs of the area into consideration by welcoming visitors with a new social forecourt. Related: Incredible luxury tree house is hidden away in a Cape Town forest “Balancing ‘striking and welcoming’, ‘bold and subtle’, the sawtoothed building appropriately addresses both the ambition and prestige of the internationally acclaimed research of DTHF as well as the sensitive human nature of their work,” the architects said. “It is on arrival that the new building shows its proudest face. From this angle, the north-facing aluminium facade fins optically compound to form a confident new image for DTHF. Seeing this strong formal presence as you approach the scheme, clearly marks a positive and impressive move forward for the Foundation and their growing footprint in developing communities around South Africa. Moving across the site, and changing one’s angle of view, the dynamic facade thins to subtly reveal the inner workings of the facility.” The zigzagging outline of the sawtooth roof is most visible on the north and south facades; the northern facade was made more prominent to mark the entrance. The roof’s geometry calls attention to the public building and lets in southern light into offices on the upper floor, while overhangs help shield the light-sensitive lab spaces on the ground floor. + theMAAK Photography by theMAAK and Anton Scholtz

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Solar-powered Villa Schoorl blends into Hollands polder landscape

May 31, 2017 by  
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Natural materials and sustainable principles led the design of Villa Schoorl, a contemporary home nestled in the green polders near the North Holland dunes. Surrounded by mills and farmhouses, the contemporary villa references the local rural vernacular with its vertical timber cladding but distinguishes itself using an eyecatching sawtooth roof. Designed by Paul de Ruiter Architects , the energy-efficient dwelling is predominately powered by rooftop solar panels. The Villa Schoorl was mostly built with natural materials to blend the building into the landscape as much as possible. “It was essential to design a villa which in its appearance and its materials is in sync with this context,” said the firm, which clad the home in untreated timber to match the nearby forests. The majority of the villa is tucked underground to further minimize its visual effect on the landscape. Despite its partially subterranean design, Villa Schoorl is flooded with natural light thanks to floor-to-ceiling glazing, skylights, and a central glass atrium . Bedrooms, a hobby room, yoga room, and bathroom are located underground. An open-plan living area, dining room, and kitchen are placed aboveground and surrounded by sliding glass doors that can be shielded with vertical folding elements for privacy and solar shading. Homeowners also have access to a covered terrace on the south end. Related: Solar-powered luxury villa is an energy-neutral gem set in a Dutch dune landscape Rooftop solar panels are mounted on the southernmost part of the sloped roof and the renewable energy harnessed provide a major part of the home’s energy supply. A wood stove connected to central heating helps to heat the home efficiently in winter. + Paul de Ruiter Architects Images by Tim Van de Velde

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Solar-powered Villa Schoorl blends into Hollands polder landscape

Prefab House Uesslingen: Iconic Swiss Design Subverted with a Sawtooth Roof

April 29, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Prefab House Uesslingen: Iconic Swiss Design Subverted with a Sawtooth Roof Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Daylighting , eco design , green design , House Uesslingen , Kanton Thurgau , low carbon footprint , natural light , pitched roof , prefab design , prefabricated home , sawtooth roof , Spillmann Echsle Architekten , sustainable design , swiss design , Switzerland        

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Prefab House Uesslingen: Iconic Swiss Design Subverted with a Sawtooth Roof

Stunning Saw-Toothed Roof Floods Swiss Vocational School With Light

August 30, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of Stunning Saw-Toothed Roof Floods Swiss Vocational School With Light Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Durisch Nolli , eco design , Gordola , green design , mountains , sawtooth roof , skylight , SSIC Complex , stilted building , sustainable design , Switzerland

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Stunning Saw-Toothed Roof Floods Swiss Vocational School With Light

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