New research reveals that sea levels could rise 1.5 inches every year

February 13, 2018 by  
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You know how we’ve been freaking out about how quickly global warming is causing ice to melt and sea levels to rise? Turns out, we weren’t panicking nearly enough. New satellite data shows that sea levels will continue to rise at a pace that is much faster than anyone predicted – at least 1.5 inches PER YEAR. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzed 25 years of satellite data from across the planet to determine how far sea levels have risen, and how much more they may rise in the near future. According to their findings, in the past 25 years, sea levels have risen nearly 3 inches. At the current rate of acceleration, sea levels will be 2 feet higher by 2100. Related: New study shows a 1-in-20 chance climate change will cause a complete societal collapse The rise is being caused by warming oceans and melting glaciers and ice sheets. The recent acceleration, according to the study, is the result of melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. The predicted sea level rise of 2 feet by century’s end may not be catastrophic for wealthier countries, but it will be devastating for those without the money to deal with impacts of global warming . Via Outer Places and CBS Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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New research reveals that sea levels could rise 1.5 inches every year

Meet your gadget’s next power supply: you

February 13, 2018 by  
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No power outlet? No problem. Juicing up your gadgets may soon be as easy as lifting your finger. Scientists from the University at Buffalo and the Institute of Semiconductors at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a tiny metallic tab, known as a a triboelectric nanogenerator, that can generate electricity from simple bodily movements,” said Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor of electrical engineering in the University of Buffalo’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “No one likes being tethered to a power outlet or lugging around a portable charger. The human body is an abundant source of energy. We thought: ‘Why not harness it to produce our own power?’” Triboelectric charging, also known as the triboelectric effect, occurs when certain materials become electrically charged after rubbing against a different material. Most everyday static electricity, for instance, is triboelectricity, Gan said. As described in a study that was published online January 31 in the journal Nano Energy , the 1.5-by-1-centimeter tab comprises two thin layers of gold separated by a sliver of polydimethylsiloxane, the same silicon-based polymer found in contact lenses and Silly Putty. Stretching the layers of gold sparks friction with the PDMS. Relatd: 6 human-powered gadgets to improve your life “This causes electrons to flow back and forth between the gold layers. The more friction, the greater the amount of power is produced,” said Yun Xu, professor of IoP at CAS, one of the study’s authors. So far, researchers have been able to deliver a maximum voltage of 124 volts, a maximum current of 10 microamps and a maximum power density of 0.22 millwatts per square centimeter—not enough to charge a smartphone just yet, but a promising start nonetheless. Because the tab is easy to fabricate in a cost-effective way, Gan and his team plan to experiment with larger pieces of gold to generate more electricity. The scientists are also working on developing a portable battery to store energy produced by the tab. Their eventual goal? To create a power source for a raft of wearable self-powered electronic devices, Gan said. + University at Buffalo Lead photo by Unsplash

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Meet your gadget’s next power supply: you

Interactive Global Fishing Watch Map to Monitor Activity on the Open Seas

November 17, 2014 by  
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SkyTruth, Oceana , and Google have just announced the release of a prototype interactive map that is designed to show all of the trackable fishing activity in the ocean. Global Fishing Watch  uses satellite data to create the first worldwide view of commercial fishing, with the aim of raising awareness of the intensity of legal fishing, while highlighting the question of how much illegal activity is going on. Read the rest of Interactive Global Fishing Watch Map to Monitor Activity on the Open Seas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: big data , boats , Fishing , Global Fishing Watch , Google , illegal fishing , interactive map , map , Oceana , overfishing , satellite data

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Interactive Global Fishing Watch Map to Monitor Activity on the Open Seas

NASA Satellites Will Help Farmers Irrigate More Efficiently

January 11, 2011 by  
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NASA has developed a computer program that analyzes satellite data, information from sensors in fields and weather observations to help farmers boost irrigation efficiency by 20 to 25 percent. Irrigation is currently responsible for 70 percent of the country’s water use, so cutting that by a quarter could have a major impact. The program will use moisture and temperature readings from soil sensors combined with Landsat satellite data on crop growth to calculate the irrigation needs of individual farms.  Farmers and vineyard managers will have access to the data in real-time via computer or mobile device, letting them determine how much water to release into the fields.  All of the information will be stored in a database so that farmers can access past and current data at any time

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NASA Satellites Will Help Farmers Irrigate More Efficiently

One-Fifth Of Juvenile Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Killed by BP Oil Spill

October 20, 2010 by  
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Map of the length of time oil was in the Gulf.

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One-Fifth Of Juvenile Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Killed by BP Oil Spill

Earth Has 12% Fewer Mangroves Than Previously Thought, New Satellite Data Reveals

August 18, 2010 by  
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photo: Tim Keegan via flickr We’ve known the world’s mangrove forests have been declining for some time, but new satellite imagery from the US Geological Survey and NASA shows that the situation is worse than we thought: More accurate mapping tells us there are 12.3% fewer mangroves than previously believed…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Earth Has 12% Fewer Mangroves Than Previously Thought, New Satellite Data Reveals

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