New Marine Education Center in Malm raises climate change awareness

January 17, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New Marine Education Center in Malm raises climate change awareness

In Malmö, Sweden, the recently completed Marine Education Center is giving visitors a closer look at the effects of climate change and sustainable technology. Copenhagen-based practice NORD Architects designed the building, which not only provides an indoor-outdoor learning landscape but also visually blurs the boundaries between the built environment and its surroundings. As a beacon of sustainability, the center is integrated with energy-efficient technologies including solar panels, geothermal heat exchangers and rainwater collection systems. Located next to the Öresund strait, the Marine Education Center officially opened in the fall of 2018, four years after NORD Architects won the bid for the project in a design competition. Surrounded by earth berms built up to resemble sand dunes, the single-story building appears nestled into the landscape, while its long footprint emphasizes the vastness of its surroundings. The wave-like protrusions that top the roof add both visual interest and practical purpose; the angled elements are used to mount solar panels , let in indirect daylight and promote natural ventilation. Related: Obra Architects stimulates climate change discussion with a “climate-correcting machine” Beneath the roof are two enclosed areas separated by a large, sheltered walkway. Walls of glass surround the classrooms and gathering spaces to let in light and frame views of the sea, while the use of timber adds a sense of warmth to the interior. The Marine Education Center was designed to be highly flexible and can adapt over time to accommodate new technologies.  “We have developed a learning landscape where education is everywhere,” said Johannes Molander Pedersen, partner at NORD Architects. “It is in the landscape, in the building and in the transition between nature and culture. The center is open for everyone who is interested in the role we as humans play in nature’s life cycle. It allows hands-on learning experience that invites users to explore using their senses in the field, and thereafter analyze and understand their observations of the marine life .” + NORD Architects Photography by Adam Mørk via NORD Architects

Read more from the original source:
New Marine Education Center in Malm raises climate change awareness

Snails defeat Trump: Irish seawall scrapped

December 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Snails defeat Trump: Irish seawall scrapped

Snails accomplished what 16 Republican primary opponents and Hillary Clinton could not: defeat Donald Trump . The US president-elect just withdrew plans to build a massive seawall that would protect his Irish golf resort from rising sea levels caused by the climate change that he previously said is a Chinese hoax . Environmental activists opposed the development that would have extended 1.7 miles (2.8 kilometers) on Doughmore Beach in the Atlantic Coast village of Doonbeg, claiming that construction of the 15-foot limestone wall would have destroyed the EU-protected Carrowmore Dunes sand dune habitat that is home to the rare prehistoric snail, vertigo anguistor. California-based environmental organization Save the Waves Coalition worked with Irish and European environmental and surfing groups to defeat the wall through the #NatureTrumpsWall campaign, gathering more than 10,000 petition signatures from around the world. Related: Climate denier Donald Trump’s favorite Florida estate is being swallowed by the sea Trump International Golf Links Doonbeg management has reportedly proposed a scaled back barrier for submittal to Clare County Council that would extend to about 600 meters at the south of the beach and 250 meters at the north of the beach. “Trump’s decision to walk away from the seawall proposal is a huge milestone for the #NatureTrumpsWalls campaign and we are very excited by this decision,” Nick Mucha, Save the Waves director of programs said in a statement. “We are proud to have brought worldwide attention to this issue and save Doughmore Beach from their ill-conceived proposal. Our work continues as they consider scaled back measures, but we are excited to spare Doughmore Beach of the monstrous seawall proposal.” While Trump has recently waffled on his past statements denying the human connection to climate change and promising to withdraw the US from the Paris climate agreement, the documents submitted for the seawall in May were quite clear about the impact of climate change, stating that “rising sea levels and increased storm frequency and wave energy associated with global warming can increase the rate of erosion.” Via Save the Waves Coalition Lead image via Wikimedia , other image via Wikimedia

Read the original: 
Snails defeat Trump: Irish seawall scrapped

Unexplained Holes Capable of Swallowing a Human Appear at National Park Sand Dunes

April 29, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Unexplained Holes Capable of Swallowing a Human Appear at National Park Sand Dunes

The Park Service has to close down portions of parks all the time for wide range of reasons, but this is the first time we have heard of one being shut down because it can swallow a person whole. Officials have announced the indefinite closure of a large sand dune near Lake Michigan known as Mount Baldy after mysterious quicksand-like holes began opening up in dune. Last summer one of the holes swallowed a 6-year old boy as he crossed the sand, and though rescuers were luckily able to recover the boy  at this point no one is sure why the holes have appeared or what can be done to stop them. Read the rest of Unexplained Holes Capable of Swallowing a Human Appear at National Park Sand Dunes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Erin Argyilan , erosion , erosion Mount Baldy , Lake Michigan erosion , Lake Michigan national parks , Lake Michigan sand dune holes , manmade soil erosion , Mount Baldy , Mount Baldy closed , Mount Baldy dune , Mount Baldy holes , Mount Baldy Indiana Dunes , Mount Baldy Lake Michigan , Mount Baldy mysterious holes , Mount Baldy park , Mount Baldy quicksand , Mount Baldy sinkholes , National Park Service , sand dunes , soil erosion

More here:
Unexplained Holes Capable of Swallowing a Human Appear at National Park Sand Dunes

Foster + Partners Unveil Massive Sand Dune-Inspired UAE Pavilion at 2015 Milan Expo

January 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Foster + Partners Unveil Massive Sand Dune-Inspired UAE Pavilion at 2015 Milan Expo

Read the rest of Foster + Partners Unveil Massive Sand Dune-Inspired UAE Pavilion at 2015 Milan Expo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable development” , 2015 Milan Expo , Emirati food , Foster + Partners , irrigation aqueduct , LEED platinum , photovoltaic cells , sand dunes , UAE Pavilion        

View original here:
Foster + Partners Unveil Massive Sand Dune-Inspired UAE Pavilion at 2015 Milan Expo

Jewel of Japan: Gorgeous Sand Dunes Like Japanese Desert

July 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Jewel of Japan: Gorgeous Sand Dunes Like Japanese Desert

[ By Delana in Geography & Travel & History & Trivia & Nature & Ecosystems . ] Japan boasts countless attractions to delight and entertain tourists, but there might not be any that are more unexpected than the Tottori Sand Dunes . The dunes, in Tottori Prefecture near Tottori City, are unlike anything else in all of Japan – and the area is so impressive that it would be easy to mistake it for a previously-unknown desert. (all images via: Oddity Central ) The Tottori Sand Dunes have existed for approximately 100,000 years. They were formed by sediment from the Sea of Japan washing up onto shore and being blown into the dunes. Strong winds constantly rearrange the sand deposits, creating incredible desert-like formations that can reach heights of 90 meters. The unusual dunes draw an estimated two million visitors each year. The weather at the dunes can be strange and unpleasant: the sand reaches temperatures of 65 degrees Celcius (nearly 150 degrees Fahrenheit) in the summer, making it impractical to walk around barefoot like one would at the beach. It also rains quite often, which can shatter the illusion of being in a desert but brings out adventurous sand-boarders and creates interesting patterns in the sand. Although the dunes bring in plenty of tourists, they are in constant danger of disappearing. Human interventions like reforestation and protective concrete barriers have prevented new sand from being deposited in the dunes, causing them to shrink significantly. If you are planning a trip to Japan, be sure to stop by this incredible location before it is gone forever. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Glass Beach: Radical Example of Natural Recycling Glass Beach in Fort Bragg, California, used to be a dump – literally. Now it’s one of the most unique and beautiful beaches on the planet. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» Gateway to Hell: The Harshest, Most Volatile Corner of Earth Step into one of the most geologically active places on Earth to see incredible otherworldly sights you will never see anywhere else…on this planet, at least. Click Here to Read More »» Get Tanked: Fabulous Faux Swimming Pool Illusions How weird would it be to gaze deep into a cool, inviting swimming pool and see an entire family walking around on the bottom, smiling and waving at you? 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Delana in Geography & Travel & History & Trivia & Nature & Ecosystems . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

See the original post here: 
Jewel of Japan: Gorgeous Sand Dunes Like Japanese Desert

Cold Comfort: 7 Amazing Antarctic Lakes

July 19, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Cold Comfort: 7 Amazing Antarctic Lakes

[ By Steve in 7 Wonders Series & Nature & Ecosystems & Science & Research . ] Lakes? In my frozen Antarctica ? It’s more likely than you think, and their existence has nothing to do with global warming. This in-depth (brrr!) look at 7 amazing Antarctic lakes shows us the 7th continent still has a few tricks up its frosty sleeve. Don Juan Pond (image via: 77 Degrees South ) Don Juan Pond may sound romantic but visitors will find intimacy is the last thing on their minds – unless getting up close & personal with Mother Nature is your thing, you salty dog! Speaking of which, Don Juan Pond ‘s hypersalinity is what keeps it from freezing over no matter how cold it gets, and (cue Larry David voice) Antarctica can get pretty, pretty cold. Scale is difficult to determine without trees, but note the red-coated researcher on the right in the above image. (images via: Polar Night Images , Hassan Basagic and Los Alamos Mountaineers ) You think the Dead Sea is salty at 8 times the ocean’s salinity? Don Juan Pond laughs at your assumptions, being 18 times saltier than the sea. Forget about floating IN it, anyone brave enough to strip down and dip their tootsies might find they float ABOVE it! (images via: The Resource Center and Walt Hamler ) Sadly, doing the Don Juan Pond flotation exercise is not an option. Scientists aren’t sure why, but over the past few decades Don Juan Pond has been steadily drying up to the point where it’s only a few inches deep. One might assume that its location in Antarctica’s Dry Valleys region doesn’t help the situation. Organic Lake (images via: Punnett’s Square , AAD and Liquida ) Located in eastern Antarctica’s Vestfold Hills, Organic Lake formed about 6,000 years ago and gets its name from the profusion of algae it hosts. These algae produce malodorous Dimethyl Sulfide as a gaseous waste product and they do so in abundance, as the 24.5 ft (7.5m) deep lake boasts the highest level of dissolved DMS of any lake on Earth. Blazing Saddles in a drop of water, that’s what they’ve got there. (images via: AAD and Smaller Questions ) Organic Lake made the news recently when scientists testing its waters discovered the Organic Lake Virophage (above, lower left), a so-called “virus-eater” that preys on larger viruses that in turn infect the lake’s algae. Further research is being conducted to find out not only how OLV functions, but if the knowledge gained can assist medical professionals in devising new antiviral drugs and treatments for viral illnesses in humans. Radok Lake (images via: Swisseduc , ANARE Club and Schepps Media ) Alien-sounding Radok Lake can be found near (the unfortunately beaver-less) Beaver Lake at the foot of the Prince Charles Mountains. Although not especially large as lakes go – it’s about 4 miles (6.43 km) long – Radok Lake is 1,188 ft (362 meters) deep making it the continent’s deepest surface-exposed lake. One wonders what waits in the extreme depths of Radok Lake , dreaming with his hordes hidden in green slimy vaults… the awful answer being, of course, “Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn.” (image via: Swisseduc ) Radok Lake’s most exception feature – visually, at least – is the spectacular “ice tongue” of the Battye Glacier which stabs into the lake and floats upon its frigid, cerulean blue waters. If Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones ever loaded up the Prius with PBR and headed out for a weekend at the beach, this is where they’d likely end up chilling out. Lake Vida (images via: DRI and National Geographic ) Livin’ la Lake Vida loca? Try nada. Lake Vida is capped with ice over 60 ft (21 m) thick, precluding its use for recreational watersports even at the height of the Antarctic summer. It’s been so for thousands of years. Beneath that protective ice cap, however, lies a mysterious lacustrine ecosystem that’s basically humming along in sweet isolation… at a frigid (but still liquid) -13°C, no less. (images via: BBC and Space Daily ) Lake Vida’s no Don Juan Pond but its kosher dill-level brine is still 7 times as saline as seawater. If it was stocked with herring, all you’d need were jars! In 2002, a research team from the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Peter Doran discovered halophile (salt-loving) cyanobacteria in ice cores drilled into Lake Vida 6 years earlier. (images via: NASA/APOD , We Heart New York and Bloody Good Horror ) Upon being thawed, the microbes awoke from their 2,800-year-long slumber and carried on much as before. NASA has since set up a Meteorological Station on the shores of Lake Vida to, well, keep tabs on things. The station is unmanned… I guess they saw that movie too. Lake Bonney Lake Bonney , a freshwater lake located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (which seem to have a lot of lakes), is 4.35 miles (7 km) long by about 1/2 mile (900 meters) wide. It was named for Thomas George Bonney, professor of geology at University College in London from 1877 to 1901, but naming it for William H Bonney (alias “Billy the Kid”) makes much more sense. Why? Because it’s fed by Blood Falls , a red-tinted plume of rusty water that pours out of the Taylor Glacier onto the lake’s surface! (images via: Taylor Valley , Space.com and Astrobioblog ) Lake Bonney may soon be visited by autonomous submersible robot NASA calls “Endurance” (though I would’ve called it the “Pat Garrett”) that will explore the depths of Lake Bonney as practice for a future mission to Jupiter’s watery moon Europa. Hopefully the exploratory mission to Europa’s subsurface ocean will go ahead without any, er, holdup. Lake Thomas (images via: QSL ) Lake Thomas, found in the Dry (yes, I know) Valleys of Victoria Land, is a freshwater lake fed by glacial melt on Antarctica’s warmer summer days. Though Lake Thomas itself isn’t especially remarkable, it’s surrounded with some of the planet’s most eerie, inhospitable, otherworldly (yet beautiful) scenery. It’s going to be a popular place once global warming really kicks in. (image via: Portland State University ) As is the case with many of the glacial meltwater lakes in the Dry Valleys region, the purity of the water in the frozen surface cap allows for a remarkable clarity shown off to full advantage by scientists and photographers alike. Lake Untersee (images via: Stampboards and WordlessTech, Dale Anderson ) Lake Untersee was discovered by the German Antarctic Expedition of 1938–39 , which did little other than name upwards of 50 topographical features with German names and drop a dozen Nazi flag markers by air… or so they would like us to think! The lake itself is about 4 miles (6.5 km) long, 1.6 miles (2.5 km) wide, and up to 554 ft (69 m) in depth. Though permanently capped with ice up to 9.8 ft (3 m) even in the summer, it’s what lies beneath Lake Untersee’s surface that has aroused both shock and surprise. (images via: TMP , Bibliotecapleyades and Fufor ) You thought there was going to be mention of a Nazi u-boat base and UFO hangar (or both), didn’t you? Sorry, fellow conspiracy theorists, no such luck. Instead, divers who braved the exceptionally alkaline water (the pH ranges from 9.8 and 12.1, like strong Chorox) discovered… life! (images via: WordlessTech ) Yes, life, albeit in a very primitive form. Those odd, purplish humped objects seen in the image above are not the spawn of Shoggoths, but stromatolites: layered structures built up layer by layer over centuries by mats of cyanobacteria. Stromatolites are among the Earth’s oldest fossils, dating back 3.5 billion years… and here they are at the bottom of an Antarctic lake. Maybe ol’ HP was on to something after all. (image via: Cthulhu’s Holiday Photos ) Anglers anxious to reel in the first fish hooked in an Antarctic lake should cool their heels, as there are no viable fish populations in any of Antarctica’s many saline or freshwater lakes. Then again, many of these lakes have been isolated from the outer environment for thousands to millions of years and new discoveries concerning their ecologies continue to be made. So go ahead and bait a hook… but if something tugs on your line, let it go, man. Just let it go. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Thicker Than Water? Antarctica’s Amazing Ecosecret Deep beneath the thick ice of Antarctica’s glaciers lies a two million year-old secret: an entire ecosystem of microbes unlike anything we’ve ever seen before. 4 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Libya’s Landlocked Lakes: Wet Spots In A Sea Of Sand Surrounded by the searing sand dunes of the Sahara, Libya’s Ubari Lakes offer intrepid travelers a refreshing splash of beauty that’s more than just a mirage. Click Here to Read More »» Fall of the Century: Stunning Pics of Dry Niagara Falls For six incredible months in 1969, the American side of the powerful Niagara Falls was dammed up…and the water temporarily stopped flowing. Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steve in 7 Wonders Series & Nature & Ecosystems & Science & Research . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

Here is the original post: 
Cold Comfort: 7 Amazing Antarctic Lakes

Bad Behavior has blocked 1437 access attempts in the last 7 days.