Virtually visit these 10 farm sanctuaries on July 25

July 9, 2020 by  
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On July 25, animal lovers are invited to participate in a virtual animal sanctuary tour that will let them peek into 10 American sanctuaries. The  Great Farm Sanctuary Tour , organized by Lancaster Farm Sanctuary in Pennsylvania, will raise money to help these nonprofits continue caring for their rescued  animals . The Northeast, Midwest,  California , Colorado, Texas and Hawaii will be represented on the virtual tour. This event will run from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and costs $25. Each sanctuary gets a 20-minute slot to introduce who they are and what they do. Related: Jon & Tracey Stewart’s animal rescue in New Jersey to join the Farm Sanctuary family “Being the only  vegan sanctuary in our region, it is so great to be able to connect with other wonderful organizations that hold the same overarching mission,” Brittany Kane of Foreverland Farm Sanctuary in Amelia, Ohio, told VegNews. “FLF is a new, small sanctuary and we are ecstatic to be able share our work with folks nationwide. We’re looking forward to meeting everyone on our tour, and learning about the great work being done all over for the animals.” Farm animal sanctuaries rescue animals from factory farms. Animal lovers — especially those from urban areas — thrill at the chance to rub a pig’s belly or look a cow in the eye. Many vegans like to visit farm sanctuaries when they travel. Of course, the  coronavirus  pandemic has taken a huge bite out of travel and axed millions of jobs. For nonprofits like animal sanctuaries, money is even tighter than usual. To support these sanctuaries, buy your ticket and tune in on July 25. Perhaps you’ll virtually meet Grandpa Pancakes, a 30-something-year-old horse in Woodstown,  New Jersey ‘s Rancho Relaxo that was saved from the slaughterhouse. Or Yoru, an orphaned Polynesian piglet found scrounging for scrap by a hiking trail, who now resides at the Aloha Animal Sanctuary, Oahu’s first nonprofit sanctuary for farmed animals. The Great Farm Sanctuary Tour is matching donations given to these farm sanctuaries via this event up to $1,000–5,000, depending on ticket sales and sponsorships. + Lancaster Farms Sanctuary Via Veg News Images via Pexels

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Virtually visit these 10 farm sanctuaries on July 25

Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

July 9, 2020 by  
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A tale of determination, exploration and sustainability, architects Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel are taking the trip of a lifetime on a repurposed, retired Arctic lifeboat. Along with their seafaring dog, Shackleton the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, these two architects have given a second life to a decommissioned lifeboat that served in the Western Isles of Scotland. While the boat was originally designed to carry 100 people in survival situations, Simmonds and Schnabel set out to repurpose and rebuild it into a self-sustaining expedition vessel. The goal was to complete the project in a little over one year, just in time to take a 3,000 mile adventure from the U.K. to the Norwegian Arctic. Related: A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer The architects renamed the boat Stødig, a Norwegian word meaning “sound and steadfast.” As the name suggests, the lifeboat’s reliable and functional design was a large inspiration for its newly adapted role as a self-sustaining and minimalist expedition vessel. The lifeboat , which was on its way to being scrapped if it had found no buyer, was bought in February 2018, and the voyage began in May 2019. The team departed from the southern British port of Newhaven before traveling along the Belgian and Dutch coast, sailing through the Kiel canal in Germany and then venturing into the Baltic Sea. The scenic route took them up the Danish and Swedish coasts past Copenhagen and Gothenburg, past Norway and up to Bergen. All along the way, Simmonds, Schnabel and Shackleton took in some of the best views the world has to offer, from showstopping sunsets and the dreamy Northern Lights to hushed evergreen forests and magnificent, snow-covered mountain landscapes. Stødig was first gutted to provide the architects with a blank canvas, on which they could bring their ideas to life. The boat redesign incorporates two forward cabins, a dining area, kitchen, a bathroom with a composting toilet, bunk beds for guests and a stern cockpit. There are solar panels on the roof, a wood-burning stove and small wind turbines incorporated for additional sustainability. It is made of fiberglass, measuring 11 meters long and 3.5 meters wide. An important feature for exploration, a number of large, curved windows were installed to provide breathtaking panoramic views and bring in as much light as possible. + Stødig Arctic Lifeboat Images via Guylee Simmonds and David Schnabel

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Two young architects travel the Arctic in a repurposed lifeboat

Villagers in Peru stumble across what may be an ancient Inca city

October 17, 2017 by  
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Locals in the southern rainforest of Peru may have stumbled across an Inca city while grazing cattle. The Provincial Municipality of La Convención shared images of the site, close to the National Sanctuary of Megantoni. In a space around two hectares big, residents found houses, walls, passageways, platforms, and streets that could date all the way back to the Inca civilization . Villagers told local authorities of their find – which occurred on September 9 – and returned with officials to take another look at what could be an old Inca citadel that had been covered by vegetation. La Convención mayor Wilfredo Alagon said he would report the find to the Decentralized Culture Directorate of Cusco (DDCC), and monument management body head Jorge Yabar Zamalloa told the Andina news agency they have sent an archaeologist to the site to put together a technical report. Related: 2,000-year-old pre-Aztec ancient palace complex found in Mexico Structures made with stone can be glimpsed in the photographs, which have been presented as evidence for the city, according to Andina. There’s no firm date attached to the archaeological remains as of yet – although the Inca civilization flourished between 1,425 C.E. and 1,532 C.E. in South America, according to the non-profit organization Ancient History Encyclopedia . The Inca civilization often utilized stone in buildings. In a 2014 article , Ancient History Encyclopedia writer Mark Cartwright said, “Inca architecture includes some of the most finely worked stone structures from any ancient civilization…it typically incorporated the natural landscape yet at the same time managed to dominate it to create an often spectacular blend of geometrical and natural forms.” Alagon said they’ll take measures to protect these remains, according to Archaeology. Via Archaeology , Provincial Municipality of La Convención , and Andina Images via Provincial Municipality of La Convención

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Villagers in Peru stumble across what may be an ancient Inca city

Help move hundreds of chimpanzees from labs to a safe haven in Georgia

September 29, 2016 by  
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Research on chimpanzees , the great ape thought to be most closely related to humans, is at last coming to an end. Last summer the US Fish and Wildlife Service declared captive chimpanzees endangered, which effectively made most chimpanzee research illegal. Now nine chimpanzees have moved from a Louisiana lab to a Georgia mountain sanctuary . Hundreds more are set to follow, and the sanctuary needs your help. Samira, Buttercup, Latricia, Charisse, Jennifer, Emma, Gracie, Gertrude, and Genesis were born at a lab. The New Iberia Research Center used these animals for medical testing for around ten years. Now they’ve been set free, and have been placed in a new home at Project Chimps . Related: NIH promises to retire remaining research chimps Tucked into the Georgia mountains, Project Chimps is a 236-acre sanctuary. Chimpanzees who live there will reside in groups, and be able to play with toys and puzzles. The chimpanzee sanctuary offers indoor cooled and heated spaces for the animals and ” acres of outdoor space ” so the chimps can explore and climb trees. There’s even a “water feature” meant to imitate streams chimpanzees would experience in Africa. Right now the sanctuary has room for 80 chimpanzees. But with over 200 more on the way, Project Chimps will be expanding to include room for 300 chimps. To accomplish this exciting feat, they could use the help of supporters. Caring for each chimp costs the sanctuary around $20,000 every year. If you want to help Project Chimps, you can donate money on their website. The sanctuary also has an Amazon Wish List if you’d like to know exactly what you’re giving to the chimpanzees and staff. You can also donate money specifically to help the sanctuary move the chimps the 16-hour drive from the lab to the sanctuary. For $200, you can send the sanctuary a picture or letter they’ll put in the transport trailer to give the chimpanzees ” something interesting to look at during their trip .” + Project Chimps Via The Christian Science Monitor Images via Project Chimps Facebook and Pixabay

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Help move hundreds of chimpanzees from labs to a safe haven in Georgia

Jon & Tracey Stewart’s animal rescue farm in New Jersey to join the Farm Sanctuary family

October 26, 2015 by  
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As the political season heats up, many Americans are pining for the humor and sharp criticism of their on-screen pal Jon Stewart  since he left “The Daily Show,” but the comedian says he doesn’t miss it at all. Evidenced in a recent CBS interview, Jon and his wife Tracey have been pretty busy since he stepped down from the show, settling into daily life on their New Jersey farm and working to transform it into an animal sanctuary. On Saturday evening, October 24, the pair were honored at a Farm Sanctuary gala in New York City, where Tracey proudly announced the Stewarts’ animal rescue site would become part of Farm Sanctuary. Read the rest of Jon & Tracey Stewart’s animal rescue farm in New Jersey to join the Farm Sanctuary family

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Jon & Tracey Stewart’s animal rescue farm in New Jersey to join the Farm Sanctuary family

Sanctuary is a cute 100% recyclable mossarium perfect for small spaces

September 16, 2015 by  
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If you want some green on your desk but don’t have room for a potted plant, you’ll love the compact Sanctuary. Launched on Kickstarter by Australia-based Botanica Boutique , Sanctuary is a mossarium that lets you grow a tiny lush landscape with minimal maintenance. Made from 100% recyclable materials, the Sanctuary features a base molded to help prevent rot and a transparent top fitted with a teardrop form to redirect condensation back onto the foliage . You can help bring the little Sanctuary mossarium to life by heading over to Botanica Boutique’s Kickstarter . + Sanctuary Kickstarter The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Sanctuary is a cute 100% recyclable mossarium perfect for small spaces

Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students

February 5, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Aidlin Darling Design , Andrea Cochran , contemplative center , rammed earth , rammed earth designs , rammed earth works , reflecting pool , sanctuary , stanford , windover , Windover Contemplative Center , Windover rammed earth , Windover University

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Stanford University’s rammed earth Windover Contemplative Center provides a tranquil space for students

Sleeping Bears Won’t Be Hunted

March 18, 2011 by  
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Photo credit: ilashdesigns / Creative Commons This guest post was written by Sharon Seltzer , one of the founders of the animal rescue group, Heaven Can Wait Sanctuary, for Care2 Causes . Hunters in Russia will no longer be allowed to wake sleeping bears from their dens during winter hibernation and shoot them because of a new law enacted on March 16…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Sleeping Bears Won’t Be Hunted

Small Homes We Operate Like We’re Sailing: Sanctuary Magazine

November 9, 2010 by  
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Westwyck development from Sanctuary magazine. Photo: Emma Cross Inside the 13th issue of Sanctuary Magazine you’ll find design notes on passive cooling, which is harder to achieve than passive heating. And a companion article argues that whilst fixed eaves work well at the height of winter or summer, the transitional months of spring and autumn (fall) require more resident participation, “passive houses need active inhabitants.” Such a building, with operable shading would offer energy rewards, whilst being simple and fun, “just like sailing!” Yet another article discusses the life cycle assessment (LCA) of building materials…

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Small Homes We Operate Like We’re Sailing: Sanctuary Magazine

Portland’s Bike Use Tops 7%; Are ‘Neighborhood Greenways’ The Answer?

November 9, 2010 by  
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I have an uneasy feeling about sharrows , those white chevrons that have been sprouting faster than crabgrass on Portland streets recently.

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Portland’s Bike Use Tops 7%; Are ‘Neighborhood Greenways’ The Answer?

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