KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Flying-V concept is an important step towards sustainable aviation

July 22, 2019 by  
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The environmental impacts of air travel has become a growing global concern. The aviation industry is focused on producing faster planes that fly higher and provide more comfort for passengers, which may create the alarming potential to produce even more carbon emissions than ever before. Presented as a solution to the increasing need for more sustainable aviation options, KLM Royal Dutch Airline has revealed a design for its “Flying V” sustainable aircraft that will use 20% less fuel than the popular Airbus A350. At the 2019 IATA Annual General Meeting in Seoul, KLM President & CEO Pieter Elbers and Dean of the Netherlands Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology Professor Henri Werij signed an agreement to work together on making aviation more sustainable. Though the design is only a concept at this point, the vision of the Technical University of Berlin and researchers at Delft, the Flying V is a monumental step towards sustainable aviation. Related: Time-saving supersonic airplanes could be a disaster for the environment With a unique aerodynamic shape, the plane’s design is shorter than the Airbus A350 (the most comparable aircraft), but with the same wingspan and the same passenger capacity. Because of this, the plane will fit easily into existing gates and runways, and fit in the same hanger as an A350. Everything from the plane bathrooms to the design of the passenger seats are as lightweight as possible for the safety and comfort of passengers. The signature v-shape wings will include the passenger cabins, the cargo (which will hold the same volume as the A350) and the fuel and the combination of a lightweight design with fuel-efficient turbofan engines makes it much more sustainable than other aircrafts.  Attendees of KLM Experience Days at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol to celebrate KLM’s 100th anniversary will have the chance to view a flying scale model and a full size section of the Flying V’s interior in October 2019. Via Images by Edwin Wallet at OSO Studio for TU Delft

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KLM Royal Dutch Airlines Flying-V concept is an important step towards sustainable aviation

Safe & Sustainable Thermoses for Your Family

June 4, 2019 by  
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Not every beverage container is made the same way, and … The post Safe & Sustainable Thermoses for Your Family appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Safe & Sustainable Thermoses for Your Family

Last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia dies

May 29, 2019 by  
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On Monday, Malaysian authorities reported that the last male Sumatran rhino died in a nature reserve on Borneo island. Currently, there is only one female from the same species remaining in Malaysia. The male, Tam, is thought to have died from old age after he was discovered on a palm oil plantation. Efforts to breed Tam with females of the same species were unsuccessful. Related: Koalas declared functionally extinct Sumatran rhinos are one of five rhino species , and only one of three found in Asia. At their peak, Sumatran rhinos could be found in Bhutan, India, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Myanmar and Laos. They are the smallest rhino species in the world. Experts estimate that between 30 and 100 remain, with a few also living in captivity in Indonesia, and the U.S. Like most species on the brink of extinction , rhinos have suffered from deforestation and loss of habitat. Logging, roads, urban development, farms and palm oil plantations have carved up their habitat. According to experts, the fragmentation of natural spaces is the primary threat to their population. Small reserves and wild spaces are simply not enough. Disconnected populations also make it difficult for the solitary creatures to find mates and reproduce. “With logging, with roads for development, the patches of forest available are shrinking. Frankly it’s hard for them to find each other to mate and breed successfully,” said Cathy Dean of Save the Rhinos International. In addition, rhinos are frequently poached for their horns and other medicinal purposes. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature lists Sumatran rhinos as critically endangered , however Save the Rhino International believes there may still be hope for the species. According to their research, only about 20 rhinos could still provide enough genetic diversity to save them from extinction if they are able to successfully mate. Via BBC Image via Charles W. Harden

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Last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia dies

With no upfront costs, this innovative financing tool makes energy efficiency affordable to all

May 2, 2019 by  
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By rolling upgrade costs into monthly bills, utilities are helping customers save energy and money at the same time

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With no upfront costs, this innovative financing tool makes energy efficiency affordable to all

Companies double down on energy productivity

April 1, 2019 by  
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Adapted from State of Green Business 2019, published by GreenBiz in partnership with Trucost, part of S&P Global.It’s well established that using less energy doesn’t have to come at the expense of economic growth. But why settle for seeking the same results with less power — the hallmark of efficiency programs — when the real jackpot could be increased sales or higher levels of productivity by prioritizing low-carbon energy management?

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Companies double down on energy productivity

How Morgan Stanley is investing in change

April 1, 2019 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: Audrey Choi from Morgan Stanley on the importance of ESG finance.

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How Morgan Stanley is investing in change

4 creative ways cities are transitioning to a clean energy future

April 1, 2019 by  
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The Bloomberg Philanthropies’ American Cities Climate Challenge is accelerating community climate leadership.

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4 creative ways cities are transitioning to a clean energy future

IKEA’s new air purifying curtain will decrease indoor pollutants

February 21, 2019 by  
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IKEA has discovered a unique way to decrease indoor pollutants with a new air purifying curtain. The Sweden-based company has developed a material that absorbs and breaks down hazardous substances in a process similar to photosynthesis in order to improve indoor air quality. Atmospheric pollution is a major issue across the planet, especially in dense, urban environments. Scientists estimate that close to 90 percent of the world’s population lives in areas that suffer from poor air quality . IKEA hopes that its new curtain, called the GUNRID, will help reduce those numbers and cut down on air pollutants in homes. Related: IKEA and Little Sun team up to design sustainable, off-grid tools “Besides enabling people to breathe better air at home, we hope that GUNRID will increase people’s awareness of indoor air pollution , inspiring behavioral changes that contribute to a world of clean air,” Lena Pripp-Kovac, IKEA’s head of sustainability, shared. According to IKEA , the curtain was developed using state-of-the-art technology that is akin to how plants naturally filter air. The chemicals that filter pollutants are activated via light, both artificial and natural sunlight. IKEA worked with scientists in Asia and Europe to develop the curtain and hopes to use the same technology in other products down the road. IKEA has a long history of developing eco-friendly practices. For the past several years, the company has been reducing the use of hazardous materials in its factories, which has greatly decreased its carbon footprint. The company plans to further cut its impact on the environment by 70 percent over the next decade. The furniture outlet has also put in place several initiatives to combat air pollution . This includes the Better Air Now! Program, which recycles rice straw and turns it into materials that are used in IKEA products. Farmers usually burn rice straw, producing fumes that decrease air quality in regions across the globe. Customers will be able to purchase the GUNRID curtain at some point in 2020. It is unclear how many future products will feature the same technology, but it will be interesting to see what IKEA comes up with. Hopefully, other companies will follow IKEA’s lead and develop air purifying products of their own. + IKEA Images via IKEA

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IKEA’s new air purifying curtain will decrease indoor pollutants

An air conditioner powered by outer space and help from the sun

January 30, 2019 by  
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Stanford researchers are testing a way to cool buildings without fossil fuels, while generating electricity at the same time.

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An air conditioner powered by outer space and help from the sun

We tried the new Impossible Burger at CES heres what we thought

January 8, 2019 by  
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The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2019 is in full swing in Las Vegas. While smart home technology, televisions and wearable tech takes center stage, many surprising innovations are grabbing media attention. Take, for instance, the latest iteration of an Inhabitat favorite — the Impossible Burger. We tried the newest recipe from Impossible at this year’s CES ; keep reading for our thoughts. Delicious in tacos or served as a classic burger, the Impossible Burger has become a favorite for vegetarians and vegans since its inception in 2016. Now, the company is debuting a new and improved recipe that boasts a flavor and texture identical to meat with a smaller impact on our planet than its animal-based counterpart. Related: Impossible Burgers to hit grocery stores in 2019 The new recipe is gluten-free and remains free of animal hormones or antibiotics. The kosher-and halal-certified “meat” will please a wide array of people with dietary restrictions. In addition to its striking resemblance in taste and texture to meat, a serving of the new Impossible Burger offers the same amount of bioavailable protein and iron as a serving of traditional ground beef. It also boasts 30 percent less sodium and 40 percent less saturated fat than the original recipe. The original recipe used wheat in its ingredients, while the new burger is made with soy. We tasted the first round of patties made with the new recipe at Las Vegas ’ Border Grill. Executive chef Mike Minor praised the meat substitute, mentioning the smell and flavor of the new Impossible Burger is “addicting” to himself and his fellow chefs. With this in mind, we couldn’t wait to dig in. Our burger was cooked medium well and looked shockingly identical to a real beef patty cooked the same way. We could already see the juiciness and charred bits before taking a bite, but we were still surprised with how delicious the burger was. It tasted like a high-end burger made from animal protein — it was juicy, tender and full of flavor. As we all know, meat has a huge carbon footprint . With a meat alternative that mimics real meat so closely, the Impossible Burger could transition hardcore meat eaters to a plant-based alternative that saves water, energy and animal lives without compromising the distinct flavor and texture that so many other alternatives miss the mark on. The new recipe is rolling out to select restaurants starting Jan. 8, 2019 and will hit grocery store shelves later this year . + Impossible Images via Impossible

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