Reclaimed timber makes up this tranquil nature retreat in Vietnam

April 16, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Vietnamese architecture firm  SILAA  has recently completed the Hachi Lily House, a nature-inspired retreat tucked into a pomelo tree-filled village near the city of Hue. The clients are a family who, after leaving the hustle and bustle of city living in search of a more peaceful lifestyle, asked the architects to design the home as the “base” for a future homestay project that will also be located on the property. The simple gable-roofed dwelling prioritizes indoor/outdoor connections and is primarily built of  reclaimed  timber salvaged from the structures of old demolished buildings.  Completed earlier this year, the 115-square-meter Hachi Lily House features a rectangular footprint set on the northeast corner of the property planted with pomelo trees. To highlight the landscape, the architects oriented the home towards views of the pomelo trees and fitted it with vast glazing, a timber  mezzanine  with views of the garden, and an outdoor veranda that spans the length of the front facade and faces a water lily pond with a small wooden bridge.  Inside, the light-filled home separates the main common areas on the south side of the home near the front entrance from the sleeping areas on the north side with two centrally located restrooms. The open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen connect seamlessly to the outdoor  veranda  via timber-framed sliding glass doors. In contrast, a natural stone wall wraps around the two bedrooms in the rear to provide privacy and to frame a hidden inner garden that includes two outdoor showers near the bathrooms.  Related: Dramatic arches usher nature inside an alley home in Vietnam A ladder in the living room leads up to a small mezzanine where the family’s library and storage are located. A  skylight  and small operable windows let in natural light and promote air circulation in the elevated space, while extended roof overhangs protect the home from unwanted solar gain in summer and the prolonged rains in winter. “Different types of stone, wood, concrete, glass, terracotta, textile, water, greenery… create a good color palette,” note the architects. “The children and their grandmother can have a good sleep in this cozy and calming atmosphere.” + SILAA Images by Hoang Le

See original here: 
Reclaimed timber makes up this tranquil nature retreat in Vietnam

Adorable goat playground raises awareness of upcycling waste

February 25, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Adorable goat playground raises awareness of upcycling waste

NOMAD architects and Karina Aramanda have transformed wood waste into GO[A]T WASTE?, an educational pavilion and animal playground that raises awareness about the merits of upcycling . Installed in the town of ?daži in Latvia, the eco-friendly project was inspired by the architects’ research into construction’s impact on climate change and environmental pollution; according to Latvia’s Ministry of Environment, the building industry is one of the biggest waste producers in the country. The architects repurposed timber off-cuts into three modular pavilions that can be joined together or used as standalone structures. The GO[A]T WASTE? project began with the collection of unwanted timber from a variety of sources, including new construction, renovation and demolition sites. Because the pavilions would only be built of upcycled waste, the final designs were limited by the materials the architects could salvage. They mostly collected short timber off-cuts with a few long, structural beams. Related: WOOMETRY upcycles salvaged wood into eco-friendly home goods The upcycled waste was transformed into three modular , mobile structures topped with roofs and equipped with tables and benches. Although the structures can be joined together into a united pavilion, each segment was individually designed with differing facades. Leftovers from the pavilion-building process were repurposed for an urban gardening project and workshop activities. The pavilions were temporarily used for an educational workshop on recycling, after which the structures were relocated near a mini-zoo and repurposed as a playground for goats. “Through the process we could identify certain topics that would improve future material reuse in building projects,” the architects said. “For example, design for disassembly principles should be kept in mind whenever new materials are used, so that later they can be handed over for reuse . During material collection from the demolition sites, much of the material had to be discarded because of too high damage. This was especially due to the excessive use of glue and nails which limit the disassembly process.” + NOMAD architects Images via ?dams Muzikants, Karina Armanda and L?va Mazure

Go here to see the original: 
Adorable goat playground raises awareness of upcycling waste

The Mountain tiny home comes with a skylit cedar shower

January 19, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The Mountain tiny home comes with a skylit cedar shower

Designed and built by CoMak Tiny Homes in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, this tiny home on wheels packs a ton of cool features into a pretty small package. Apart from sustainable elements like a composting toilet and lightweight steel siding, The Mountain tiny home also boasts beautiful French doors, shiplap walls, a touchless kitchen sink faucet, and — our favorite feature — a bright, skylit cedar shower. Cody Makarevitz of CoMak Tiny Homes wanted to explore the idea of a tiny house that is cheaper and more mobile than standard tiny homes. “With the way the industry seems to be going, mansion tinys with not so tiny prices, I wanted to get back to the roots of the movement and make something a little more financially digestible for someone who doesn’t want to break the bank,” he told Inhabitat. “I also wanted to make a nice, high-quality product and livable at that size. This was the result.” Related: This tiny home on wheels features a cool laundry chute From the brick overlay under the kitchen island to the distressed barn wood beams on the ceiling, this home has plenty of thoughtful, stylish touches. The kitchen also has live edge walnut countertops, waterproof vinyl flooring and an on-demand hot water heater. Many of the materials used in the project were salvaged from other projects. On the other side of the tiny home, you’ll find a bathroom with Delta shower hardware, a Nature’s Head composting toilet (though it is also plumbed for standard toilet capabilities) and a cedar shower complete with 3-foot-by-3-foot skylight; you might just feel like you’re showering outside. Although The Mountain tiny home is built on a custom 13-foot-by-8-foot trailer frame, the shower bump and the front porch overhang bring the length to 18 feet. The downstairs square footage is just over 100 square feet with another 50 square feet in the loft. A 12-foot telescoping ladder leads to the loft , which has room for a king-sized bed and includes another tempered, double-pane skylight. + Tiny Estates Images via Cody Makarevitz

Read more from the original source: 
The Mountain tiny home comes with a skylit cedar shower

Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

June 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

Seattle-based design firm Weber Thompson has completed construction on Watershed, a mixed-use development that aggressively reduces its energy and water usage compared to conventional construction of the same size. Located in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, the inspiring project is one of a few pioneering buildings pursuing the city’s Living Building Pilot Program. The project will also be targeting the Materials, Place and Beauty petals toward Petal Certification from the International Living Future Institute’s Living Building Challenge. Set at the intersection of Troll Avenue and 34th Street, the seven-story Watershed building comprises approximately 5,000 square feet of ground-floor retail as well as 67,000 square feet of office space above. In addition to offering mixed-use appeal, the building also takes on an educational role. It includes informative signage in the landscape to help the public learn about the importance of clean water in the region as well as a digital dashboard in the lobby that displays real-time building performance data. To achieve the standards of Seattle’s Living Building Pilot Program, Watershed is required to reduce energy use by 25% and water use by 75% compared to a baseline building. Related: The net-zero Frick Environmental Center is officially one of the world’s greenest buildings Most impressively, Watershed features a comprehensive stormwater management plan that aims to capture and treat millions of gallons of runoff a year. Its cantilevered roof is engineered to capture 200,000 gallons of water a year that is used for on-site toilet flushing and irrigation. Stepped bio-retention planters also help retain and treat an additional 400,000 gallons of polluted stormwater runoff from the adjacent street and the Aurora Bridge annually prior to discharge in Lake Union. The building will eventually clean nearly 2 million gallons of toxic runoff from the Aurora Avenue Bridge annually as part of its three-phase Green Stormwater Infrastructure project. “Like every project we design, we’ve approached Watershed as an opportunity to create a building that positively impacts the broader community,” said Kristen Scott, architect and senior principal at Weber Thompson. “Watershed allows us to take what we’ve learned from some of our most ambitious sustainability projects to date and dig deeper to find new ways to showcase practical, achievable deep green design. Our goal is to inspire, through design, a stronger connection to place, community, and the environment around us.” The sustainable building also uses locally sourced materials, salvaged materials and state-of-the-art building energy controls and systems.  + Weber Thompson Images via Weber Thompson

Read more:
Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

A Mumbai industrial complex becomes a modern, mixed-use campus

May 29, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A Mumbai industrial complex becomes a modern, mixed-use campus

In the Mumbai suburb of Vikhroli, Indian architectural firm Studio Lotus and GPL Design Studio have given a disused industrial complex new life as a modern, mixed-use center. Dubbed the Imagine Studio, the project serves as an experience center for ‘The Trees,’ a flagship adaptive reuse project for Godrej Properties Ltd. Imagine Studio provides new public and private functions while celebrating the site’s industrial heritage. Located on a one-acre site, the Imagine Studio complex spans 10,763 square feet and comprises a small cluster of renovated industrial buildings. The programming includes a marketing office, sample showcase flats for ‘The Trees,’ meeting spaces, an all-day cafe located within a repurposed Boiler Plant, a multipurpose gallery for cultural events and several outdoor spaces to market the client’s upcoming residential and commercial development properties. The public is also invited to experience the multifunctional space. “The intent was to illustrate an invigorated public realm as a microcosm of the [Trees’] master plan while preserving the essence of the site’s industrial heritage,” the architects said. “Existing buildings and its elements were recycled not only to underline their relevance in the bygone eras but also add meaning as important design punctuations in the narrative. The buzzing public spaces will eventually extend the edge of the gated development to include the community and city in its activities. Buildings of the Imagine Studio will ultimately get absorbed into the commercial hub of the development; continuing to stay on as key markers celebrating the rich traditions of the historic company while taking it strategically forward into its future.” Related: Architects to transform two old railway yards into eco parks in Milan The Imagine Studio is defined with an industrially inspired palette that includes concrete, Corten steel , brass and timber combined to follow the Japanese principles of “wabi sabi,” or a view of beauty in imperfection. The materials are deliberately left unfinished so as to develop a patina over time. Elements from the old buildings were also salvaged and reused, such as the old louvers of the primary industrial plant that were repurposed, coated in Corten steel and perforated with patterns. + Studio Lotus Images via Edmund Sumner, Dilip Bhatia, Studio Lotus, GPL Design Studio

Go here to read the rest: 
A Mumbai industrial complex becomes a modern, mixed-use campus

Reclaimed materials and a massive green wall transports Denali shoppers to the great outdoors

November 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Reclaimed materials and a massive green wall transports Denali shoppers to the great outdoors

Earlier this fall, Connecticut-based, multidisciplinary design practice Pirie Associates completed a biophilic store that evokes the image of a romantic, aging barn bursting with lush greenery. The newly opened Providence, Rhode Island store was created as the eighth brick-and-mortar location for the outdoor clothing and gear retail chain Denali . The store sits next to Brown University on Thayer Street and brings together a massive, low-maintenance vertical green wall with a predominately timber material palette to pull the outdoors in. Most of the materials were reclaimed in keeping with the company’s commitment to environmental stewardship. Sheathed within a brick-and-steel envelope that complements the surrounding urban fabric, the new Denali Providence store greets passersby with full-height glazing on the ground floor. Though the shop might seem like the average brick-and-mortar building from the outside, shoppers are treated to a visual surprise in the woodland-inspired interior with a double-height space filled with 20 birch tree poles — with the bark intact — as well as a large vertical green wall filled with New England plants and overhead skylights that provide natural light. The design aims “to transport customers to a new state of mind with a biophilic interior ‘kit-of-parts’ [that Pirie Associates has] now used in several locations,” the firm said in a press release. To lure people upstairs, two 32-foot-tall birch tree poles were strategically positioned through the U-shaped stairwell and stretch upward from the ground floor to the ceiling of the second level. Related: Nearly 10,000 plants grow on NYC’s largest public indoor green wall Apart from the paint, electrical equipment and HVAC, most of the materials used to construct the store were reclaimed or recycled and were often locally sourced. Salvaged materials include the barn doors, corrugated sheet metal and the nearly two dozen birch tree poles. The vertical green wall that spans two stories was designed for low maintenance and is integrated with a self-irrigation system. + Pirie Associates Photography by John Muggenborg via Pirie Associates

Original post: 
Reclaimed materials and a massive green wall transports Denali shoppers to the great outdoors

A dark, damp house becomes a sustainable, sun-soaked abode

November 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A dark, damp house becomes a sustainable, sun-soaked abode

Formerly cold, dim and damp, a terrace house in Northcote, Victoria has been reborn into a vibrant and welcoming dwelling with an emphasis on gardening. Designed by Green Sheep Collective for a client named Jill, the compact project, named Jill’s House, saw a modest expansion of just 22 square meters of space yet gained its bright and spacious feel thanks to a thorough renovation. Created to meet the client’s aspirations for a “very healthy home,” Jill’s House embraces recycled materials, low VOC finishes and passive solar principles for a minimal energy footprint. Having developed deep ties with her local community, the homeowner wanted the renovated house to be suitable for long-term living and retirement. As a result, the redesign prioritized accessibility, low maintenance and durability. Tapping into its extensive experience in eco-friendly retrofits, Green Sheep Collective opened the home to greater amounts of natural light while improving energy efficiency with the reorientation of the living areas to the north and the installation of high-performance materials, such as improved insulation and low-e double glazing. The open-plan living area also enjoys a seamless connection with the outdoors to support the client’s hobby of gardening. “The comfort, energy efficiency and longevity of the house have been improved immeasurably,” the designers noted. “Despite an existing north wall along the boundary, sunlight is brought deep into the house via a raked ceiling paired with electric-operated clerestory windows that soar above the kitchen and dining areas, doubling to encourage the ‘stack effect’ for ventilation and distinguish the extension from the original Victorian home.” Related: Smart Home targets affordability and eco-friendly design in Australia Adding to the overall sense of vibrancy, bright pops of color woven throughout were inspired by the client’s favorite Derwent pencils from childhood. A natural materials palette  — including plantation timber flooring and recycled red bricks — lend additional warmth and complement the restored furnishings that include the dining table, dining chairs and lounge suite. + Green Sheep Collective Photography by Emma Cross via Green Sheep Collective

View post: 
A dark, damp house becomes a sustainable, sun-soaked abode

These enchanting, off-grid cabins are handcrafted from salvaged materials

October 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on These enchanting, off-grid cabins are handcrafted from salvaged materials

Ambitious tiny cabin crafter  Jacob Witzling  has taken inspiration from childhood fairytales to build some seriously dreamy woodland dwellings for himself and his friends. Using  reclaimed wood  and other materials scavenged from construction sites, Witzling has designed and handcrafted a series of gorgeous tiny cabins tucked deep into lush forestscapes. Inspired by a deep respect for nature, all of his amazing cabins run 100 percent off the grid with no running water. It seems as if Witzling was destined to be close to nature. As a teenager, he moved into a 1920s cabin tucked into a wooded forest near his parents’ house. Although he would go home to do laundry and eat, he said that he always found himself drawn back to his real home in the woods. He has always preferred to live with simple pleasures. “Inside was a wood stove that I fed and stoked through the harsh winter nights,” Witzling explained. “I had my freedom and my fire. They were all I needed to be happy.” Witzling has taken his love of simple living and turned it into an amazing craft based on sustainability. Not only are all of his cabins built with reclaimed materials , but they are completely off-grid. They are powered by 12-volt D/C systems using deep cycle batteries. All water needed for drinking, cooking and bathing is collected from a well, and separate outhouses are equipped with composting toilets . Most of his wooden cabins are built on land owned by friends or acquaintances. He builds the structures with the agreement that he will have complete access after their completion. To date, he has built six amazingly unique cabins, including an innovative home on the bed of a pickup truck. Take a look below. Cabin 1 Witzling’s very first cabin was built for just $800. The two-story structure with a sloping shed roof was constructed out of reclaimed building materials , including salvaged wood, nails and screws leftover from construction projects, a local reuse store and straight from garbage pits. The cabin has two levels, a ground level of 100 square feet and a 70-square-foot sleeping loft. Witzling lived in this cabin for three years. Related: 9 brilliant backwoods cabins for reconnecting with nature Cabin 2 The second tiny cabin was built with wood salvaged from an old warehouse. Certainly fairytale-inspired, this 200-square-foot cabin takes on a cruciform shape with two pitched roofs covered in thick moss. Inside, there’s a compact living area and a 90-square-foot sleeping loft, all illuminated with natural light. Cabin 3 The third cabin (perhaps the most impressive) is a tiny octagonal structure with a pyramid roof featuring eight A-frame dormers. Witzling built the geometric cabin with his lifelong friend Wesley Daughenbaugh. Two large wooden doors open into the 135-square-foot interior, where many windows flood the space with natural light . The roofs are covered with metal sheets, chicken wire and a layer of moss. Cabin 4 The fourth cabin is quite distinct from the previous work in that the roof design is so eccentric. The cabin, which he built with his brother, Ethan Hamby, is set on an 80-square-foot, irregular base and topped with an  undulating pitched roof layered in small wooden shingles. The cabin was built with all reclaimed materials and is 17 feet long, 11 feet tall and 7 feet wide with a small, 30-square-foot sleeping loft inside. Cabin 5 The fifth cabin was a collaborative effort between Witzling, his brother Ethan and a childhood friend, Scott Pearson. The 200-square-foot wooden cabin , again made out of reclaimed lumber, is built on 25-square-foot alcoves on each side. A pitched 4-foot spire adds a chapel-like aesthetic to the cabin, which is surrounded by forest and adjacent to a small lake. Truck Cabin From off-grid cabins nestled into evergreen forests to homes on wheels roaming the highways, Witzling’s sixth project is a surprising twist to the traditional tiny cabin. Using the roof design from Cabin 4 as inspiration, he and his partner, Sara Underwood, built a tiny asymmetrical cabin on the bed of a 1979 pickup truck. The crafty duo are currently exploring the U.S. in their amazing creation. You can follow their adventures on Jacob’s Instagram . + Jacob Witzling Via Dwell Photography by Jacon Witzling, Sara Underwood, Forrest Smith, Chris Poops, Andrew Kearns, Erik Hecht, Justin D. Kauffman, Allen Meyer, Peter Crosby all via Jacob Witzling

See the original post:
These enchanting, off-grid cabins are handcrafted from salvaged materials

This human-sized birdhouse for two is perched among the treetops

November 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This human-sized birdhouse for two is perched among the treetops

If you’ve ever wished you could make like a bird and roost in the trees, you’ll love this charming birdhouse-shaped hideaway nestled in a British Columbia forest. Calgary-based design firm Studio North recently completed Birdhut, a cozy nest for people and birds alike. Built of reclaimed pine felled by a recent fire, the tiny 100-square-foot structure uses locally scavenged materials to mimic a bird’s nest-building process. Accessible via a bridge to the hillside, the cozy one-room Birdhut sleeps two (and a dog). Salvaged lodgepodge pines were used for the cross-braced structure, while planks reclaimed from a cabin deck are used for the platform and cladding. Western Red Cedar rounded shingles clad the facade and 8-millimeter clear polycarbonate panels top the roof, letting ample natural daylight into the cabin. Two circular windows let in natural ventilation. Related: Enchanting birdhouses inspired by famous architecture Twelve smaller circular holes punctuate the facade, each designed for different native birds . “The pileated woodpecker for instance, is a larger bird that seeks out a nesting space 15 to 25 feet above ground, with a 4” entry hole and an 8”x8”x24” cavity,” wrote the designers. “The warbler, on the other hand, is a smaller bird that typically nests 9 feet above ground with a 1 1/8” hole and a 4”x4”x6” cavity. Considering both the largest and smallest varieties of local birds, the hut sits 9 feet off the ground, with its peak at 20 feet above the ground and birdhouses scattered in between.” + Studio North Images by Mark Erickson

Go here to read the rest:
This human-sized birdhouse for two is perched among the treetops

MAD Architects-designed residences rise like mountains in a UNESCO Heritage site

November 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MAD Architects-designed residences rise like mountains in a UNESCO Heritage site

MAD Architects just completed the Huangshan Mountain Village, their latest nature-inspired project that mimics the curves of China’s most beautiful mountains in a UNESCO World Heritage site. Located on a ridge, the developments comprise ten unique buildings that rise like individual peaks overlooking Taiping Lake. The use of nature as inspiration creates, in the architects’ words, a new type of village landscape “where architecture becomes nature, and nature dissolves into architecture.” The Huangshan Mountain Village was created as part of a larger tourism masterplan for Huangshan Taiping Lake, a landscape rich in greenery, granite peaks, and historical significance. To respect the local topography , the architects designed each building with undulating lines that respond to the mountainous terrain and nearby terraced tea fields. Each structure juts out from the forest canopy like craggy granite mountains sculpted by the natural forces of wind and water. Spacious balconies and large strips of glazing bring the outdoors in. Related: MAD Architects Unveil Mountain-Shaped Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Center “The impression we have of Taiping Lake in Huangshan is vague: each visit to this place yields different views, different impressions,” said Founder Ma Yansong . “It is a bit mysterious, like ancient Shanshui landscape paintings that are never based on realism, but rather, the imagination. This inexplicable feeling is always poetic; it is obscure and indistinct. This is the basic idea: we hope that residents will not just look at the scenery, but see themselves in relation to this environment, attention that is brought inward. In observing oneself, one perhaps begins to notice a different self than the one present in the city.” + MAD Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Laurian Ghinitoiu

See original here: 
MAD Architects-designed residences rise like mountains in a UNESCO Heritage site

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1688 access attempts in the last 7 days.