Historic Missouri church rises from the ashes with an eco-friendly twist

April 3, 2017 by  
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When the 2011 catastrophic fire ravaged the historic Westport Presbyterian Church in Kansas City , much of the church’s structure and finishes were completely destroyed. Fortunately, however, the original limestone facade survived in good condition. Rather than knock down the building and start anew, Kansas City-based design firm BNIM reconstructed the iconic church, from the painstaking restoration of sacred components to the creation of a new addition that features modern and eco-friendly elements. Built in 1905, the 27,000-square-foot multi-story Westport Presbyterian Church is one of the most iconic buildings in Kansas City’s historic Westport community. BNIM and the community came together to rebuild the church and tackle the challenges of preserving original elements while crafting a space that was also dynamic and progressive. Parts of the church considered not sacred were deconstructed and large amounts of salvaged material —from the reclamation of 40,000 feet of pinewood framing material to the reuse of original limestone—were used in reconstruction. The restored and renovated church features a new addition with a 150-seat sanctuary, 40-seat chapel , gathering space, fellowship room, 3,000-square-foot multipurpose room, a 1,000-square-foot street-facing “community room”, administrative offices and office space that will be leased to a Westport area nonprofit. The renovation includes energy saving elements such as LEDs and contemporary stormwater management practices. All stained glass was restored and reinstalled in contemporary mounting. The project won an AIA Kansas Merit Award and an AIA Kansas City Citation Award. Related: Stunning see-through church is made from stacked weathered steel “This is one that put a smile on all our faces,” said an AIA Kansas City jury member. “There was a fire, and it destroyed just about everything on this church except for the stone walls. For the community to come together and rebuild this, and do it in such a thoughtful, elegant, and modern way, was something the jury really applauded.” Another jury member added: “It wasn’t just a restoration, it was a repositioning of the whole church itself. It made for a better building, and we think more connected to the community.” + BNIM Images via BNIM

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Historic Missouri church rises from the ashes with an eco-friendly twist

Rusty shovel heads transformed into delicate lace-inspired sculptures

February 27, 2017 by  
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Artist Denise Bizot has a gift for breathing new life into an unexpected medium—rusted shovel heads. The New Orleans-based artist retrieves discarded shovel heads from salvage yards and carves beautifully intricate lace-inspired designs into the rusted surfaces. She typically keeps the oxidized patina intact for the visual contrast between the weathered object and the delicate new designs. Formerly a drafter in the petroleum industry, Bizot returned to Loyola New Orleans to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a focus on sculpture. Her interest in found objects , particularly metals, sparked her metalworking craft and love of transforming discarded junk and debris found in New Orleans into beautiful sculptures. In addition to her reworked shovel heads and other sculptures, Bizot also creates more functional pieces such as metal room dividers and handmade tables. Related: Artist sculpts lifelike grizzly bear from recycled cardboard “Like many cities undergoing gentrification , New Orleans is replete with discarded metal, miscellaneous street junk and salvage yards teeming with all sorts of debris,” writes Bizot. “For me, the idea of reclaiming, deconstructing and transforming “so-called junk” into works of sculpture is fascinating.” + Denise Bizot

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Rusty shovel heads transformed into delicate lace-inspired sculptures

Green-roofed apartment block in Tehran uses recycled rainwater and reclaimed materials

October 10, 2016 by  
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Though the Saba Apartment’s sustainable elements are impressive, the building’s most eye-catching features are its wavy timber shutters that cover the street-side grid façade made of square recessed windows. The wooden slats also lend a warm touch to the light-colored stone exterior. The floor-to-ceiling shutters can be swiveled and moved by hand to block unwanted solar gain and for privacy. This double-skin facade and the recessed balconies with double-glazed windows help residents keep cool in the Tehran heat. A garden located in the rear comprises a pool, planting beds, and paving made from recycled railway sleepers. The apartment’s garden-facing facade is made from locally sourced and reclaimed brick and covered with modular vertical planters fed drip irrigation using rainwater harvested from the roof. A green roof tops the building and is integrated with solar panels that generate the energy used for lighting the communal areas. Related: Prefab Parisian housing is clad in a double-skin timber facade to optimize solar shading “With the change in people’s lifestyle, development of the cities and the uprising demand for constructing high-rise buildings; this valuable heritage of our ancestors efforts in engaging the architecture with nature has gone obliterated, which has changed into a blurred memory over less than a century,” write the architects. “This project was the result of our efforts in revitalizing this lost heritage and giving a new interpretation to the old concept. Which we believe one of the main reasons of the cultural crisis our society is engaged with nowadays is the result of this abrupt shift in the living space.” + TDC Office Via Dezeen Images via TDC Office

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Green-roofed apartment block in Tehran uses recycled rainwater and reclaimed materials

The Hoopy is a bicycle you can build yourself out of recycled parts and wood

September 12, 2016 by  
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If you’re looking for an affordable, lightweight wooden bike that will get attention wherever you ride, the Hoopy might be just what you’re looking for. A lightweight design that can be adapted for adults of almost any height, the Hoopy features a light plywood frame that can be used to store tools, spare tires, or groceries! The flexible frame can even be adapted easily to store a motor in the case of an electric bike. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOp58Ur-VOQ&feature=youtu.be&ab_channel=WoodenWidget Now, you can’t simply walk into your local bike shop and pick up a Hoopy. Instead, you can buy a set of detailed instructions that walk you through the process of building your own, from finding the wood to assembling the frame. The entire process can be completed in just two days – the pieces are cut with a drill and a jigsaw, then assembled with a strong but light epoxy glue. All told, the finished frame weighs only 3 kilos (6.6 lbs). The completed bicycle ends up weighing in the 12-14 kilo (26-30 lb) range. The finished bike can be built to accommodate riders from 1.5 meters (5’2”) to 1.9 meters (6’4”), and can hold up to 200 kilos (440 lbs). Each bike can be further personalized during the design process, with instructions on how to create cut-outs of various shapes. And, of course, the wooden construction allows for a variety of paint or varnish finishes. Related: Beautiful birch AERO Bike is a testing ground for architectural techniques Most of the bike can actually be created using parts from salvaged bicycles , further cutting the cost of the build. Depending on the parts you choose to purchase, it’s possible to build a basic Hoopy for as little as £250 ($331). The plans for the Hoopy itself sell for a mere £30.  Wooden Widget , the company that sells the Hoopy plan, will even plant five trees on your behalf with any order. + Hoopy

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The Hoopy is a bicycle you can build yourself out of recycled parts and wood

Architect transforms scrap yard materials into a vibrant discotheque

July 4, 2016 by  
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Architect Manoj Patel transformed materials sourced from a scrap yard into a 2,101-square-foot discotheque. Made from mostly reclaimed materials , the project was created with the aim of creating a vibrant space that minimized its impact to the environment. Recycling is celebrated in the design and prominently featured in the discotheque’s entrance area, which is decorated with recycled tin lids. Recycled beer bottles and recycled paper line the foyer, while reclaimed barrels can be found at the mocktail bar. Other salvaged materials can be found throughout the space. + Manoj Patel The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Architect transforms scrap yard materials into a vibrant discotheque

Macro Sea revamps 100-year-old factory as shabby chic student housing in Berlin’s hippest neighborhood

August 31, 2015 by  
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Macro Sea revamps 100-year-old factory as shabby chic student housing in Berlin’s hippest neighborhood

New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

August 31, 2015 by  
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How would the world look if humans had never spread out across the Earth? For a start, we’d have a lot more forest, much less pollution, and the stars would look unbelievably bright. But, as a new map shows, the planet would also be absolutely teeming with large mammals , from the Serengeti to Northern Europe and all the way across the Americas. Researchers at Denmark’s Aarhus University have created a global map which shows the distribution of large mammals as it may have been if humans had never left Africa. Read the rest of New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

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New map shows where large mammals would exist without humans

Solar-powered Josey Pavilion beats wicked hot Texas summers without air-conditioning

August 31, 2015 by  
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Olson Kundig-designed lush public park hides itself in plain sight – on the ninth floor of a department store in South Korea

August 21, 2015 by  
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Olson Kundig-designed lush public park hides itself in plain sight – on the ninth floor of a department store in South Korea

New carbon nanofiber process could reduce atmospheric C02 to pre-industrial levels in just a decade

August 21, 2015 by  
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Imagine being able to turn pollution into something useful while returning the planet to pre-industrial carbon levels in just ten years. Scientists believe that it’s possible: a new process developed by team at George Washington University could manufacture the fibers using carbon dioxide extracted from Earth’s atmosphere – talk about a win/win for everyone. The double-whammy discovery could help tackle climate change , while revolutionizing many industries. According to Gizmag , carbon nanofibers could one day be used for everything from building better bulletproof vests to fixing damaged hearts, not to mention making a big dent in climate change.   Read the rest of New carbon nanofiber process could reduce atmospheric C02 to pre-industrial levels in just a decade

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