Bureau of Land Management moves forward with the sale of sacred land

February 6, 2019 by  
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The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is moving forward with the sale of land in the vicinity of New Mexico’s Chaco Culture National Historical Park. The land, which is considered sacred ground by Native Americans in the area, was approved amid heavy criticism from environmentalists and tribal leaders. The land is being purchased to pursue the development of oil and gas, with around 50 parcels of land up for grabs. One of the biggest issues surrounding the sale is that it was approved while the government was partially shutdown , which resulted in limited access of information. Related: Damage to Joshua Tree during the government shutdown could take centuries to repair According to AP News , critics claim that government officials failed to properly inform everyone on the sale of the property. They also asked if the BLM had enough staff members on hand to properly analyze the land and sale requests. In fact, Senator Tom Udall issued a scathing report on the land sale and called out the BLM for not being transparent throughout the process. “It’s a mistake that while critical public services were shuttered for 35 days during the government shutdown, BLM still moved forward with this opaque process,” Udall shared. Critics of the sacred land sale also wondered if the BLM will open a protest period, which is usually standard in these types of transactions. Fortunately, the agency has opted to delay the sale to give tribal leaders and environmentalists a few weeks to protest. The BLM is officially accepting protests beginning on February 11. The land sale is expected to go through at the end of March. If the protests are successful, a portion of the land that is up for sale will be withdrawn. Supporters are hoping that land within 10 miles around Chaco will be deemed off limits. This area, which would serve as a buffer zone, would help protect features that are sacred to local tribes, including kivas and stone structures. Chaco is currently inaccessible by paved roads. Local tribes hope to preserve the remoteness of the area, which has served as a religious and economic center for centuries. The BLM has not issued any comments about the land sale. Via AP News Image via Zenhaus

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Bureau of Land Management moves forward with the sale of sacred land

Renewable gas: the hot new fuel from animal waste?

December 4, 2017 by  
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Otherwise known as biomethane, UPS and others are switching to save money, while suppliers earn extra money from the sale of credits.

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Renewable gas: the hot new fuel from animal waste?

Looking past the horizon of renewable energy

December 4, 2017 by  
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For one, experts are coming to view energy storage as a “Swiss Army knife” for renewables.

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Looking past the horizon of renewable energy

Cities must repave the ‘last mile’ of public transit

December 4, 2017 by  
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We are all pedestrians. So why aren’t cities more walkable?

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Cities must repave the ‘last mile’ of public transit

Michael Kobori on stretching beyond the sustainability department

December 4, 2017 by  
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The best of live interviews from GreenBiz events. This episode: The Levi Strauss leader offers a glimpse at broadening the reach of sustainability.

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Michael Kobori on stretching beyond the sustainability department

China makes it illegal to eat endangered species

July 13, 2016 by  
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A new law in China makes it illegal to eat members of an endangered species , a major step forward in protections for wild animals. However, animal rights activists claim the legislation doesn’t go far enough, because it fails to address other threats. Captive breeding, public performances, and consumption in non-food products (i.e. traditional Chinese medicine, or TCM) are still allowed under the new law, and conservationists argue that these uses are what motivates the largest portion of endangered species poaching. China’s new law specifically bans the sale of food products made from endangered species recognized by the state government. Writing for The Shanghaiist , Robin Winship said that “simply restricting the sale of endangered animals as food, while nice and all, does not nearly suffice” when it comes to protecting those animals. In this way, China’s wildlife policies are not unlike its environmental protection efforts, which are criticized widely for being too soft to resolve very real problems. Related: Increased demand for lion bones threatens the species more than ever Because the law doesn’t address breeding and medicinal uses of endangered animal parts , many animals will continue to be bred and killed for use in TCM . For instance, stomach bile from bears is used in elixirs, despite a total absence of scientific evidence of any human benefit. In order to collect the bile, bears are bred in captivity, forced to live in cramped cages, and the animals often die from botched surgical attempts to extract their bile. Meanwhile, rhinoceros horns are also highly sought after, to be ground to a powder and used to treat a variety of ailments, again without any evidence that the treatment works. Many other animals are carved up for so-called medicinal purposes, with plenty of other endangered species bred as exotic pets or to be killed for some other senseless reason, like fashion. There are a lot of unanswered questions about how the new law will be enforced, considering the difficulties (or perhaps impossibilities) of identifying whether an animal is being sold as a food ingredient or for medical purposes, or whether an animal was wild-caught or captive bred. Without implementing clear procedures for permits or licensing for legal uses, China’s government may have just passed a law it can’t possibly enforce. Via Good Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 )

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China makes it illegal to eat endangered species

ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

July 13, 2016 by  
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMJCd04ehKc ? Created as part of the National Building Museum’s Summer Block Party series, the 12,540-square-foot ICEBERGS project comprises over 30 geometric, iceberg-shaped elements in a variety of sizes ranging from 16 feet to 56 feet in height. Some of the triangular pentahedron and octahedron “icebergs” are suspended in the air, while others appear to float. The jagged landscape was constructed from prefabricated units made from reusable scaffolding and translucent polycarbonate paneling . White slides punctuate some icebergs as a playful interactive feature. ? “ICEBERGS invokes the surreal underwater-world of glacial ice fields,” said James Corner, founder and director of James Corner Field Operations. “Such a world is both beautiful and ominous given our current epoch of climate change , ice-melt, and rising seas. The installation creates an ambient field of texture, movement, and interaction, as in an unfolding landscape of multiples, distinct from a static, single object.” Related: Gigantic swimmable ball pit takes over D.C.’s National Building Museum ? Visitors can experience ICEBERGS from the Great Hall floor that’s punctuated with triangular beanbags, caverns, and grottoes, or from a higher level where they can look down at the “water line” suspended 20 feet in the air. The tallest “iceberg” rises to the height of 56 feet and includes a viewing area. To complement the installation, the Daikaya restaurant provides Japanese ‘kakigori’ shaved ice treats. The installation opened July 2, 2016 and will run until September 5, 2016. + James Corner Field Operations + National Building Museum Images by Timothy Schenck

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Tiger farming is cultivating a taste for luxury tiger products in China – and increasing poaching

January 6, 2015 by  
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What do you do when you can’t poach tigers anymore ? Why you raise them, of course. Instead of stopping the sale of tiger parts in countries like China, some enterprising Chinese entrepreneurs are simply raising tigers on farms, circumventing  problems with poaching in the wild. At the same time, they’re normalizing the sale and consumption of tiger meat and tiger-based “medicinal products,” as well as the decorative value of skins and other tiger items like claws. Read the rest of Tiger farming is cultivating a taste for luxury tiger products in China – and increasing poaching Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bengal tiger , China killing tigers , China tiger parts , China tigers , Chinese tiger farms , endangered animal protection , endangered animals , endangered tigers , India tigers , poaching tigers , tiger bone wine , tiger farms , tiger parts

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Tiger farming is cultivating a taste for luxury tiger products in China – and increasing poaching

Velodome offes cyclists smart solutions for on-the-go bike repair

January 5, 2015 by  
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Bicycling  is a brilliantly green way to get around and new products are always being designed to appeal to cyclists. Now, equipment that used to be available only at bike shops or in home basements and garages is popping up in cities, colleges and corporate campuses around the country. Called Public Bike Repair and Maintenance , commercial grade bike pumps and bike repair stands are being installed in “public” locations that are readily accessible to cyclists but bolted into concrete to prevent theft. Velodome Shelters is getting in on the trend with their latest products, a new Deluxe Public Work Stand and Wheel Chock. A sleek looking fixture, the Deluxe Public Work Stand enables cycling enthusiasts to make repairs while on the road, day or night and the Wheel Chock enables two bikes to be repaired at one time.  The stand incorporates all of the necessary tools to maintain and repair bicycles and get cyclists back on the road. + Velodome Shelters The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bicycle commute , bicycle repair kits , bicycle repair on the go , bicycle transportation , bike repair , green transportation , public bicycle repair kit , Velodome bike kit , Velodome public bike repair , Velodome Shelters

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Velodome offes cyclists smart solutions for on-the-go bike repair

Grand Canyon National Park Plans to Ban the Sale of Plastic Bottles in 2012

December 20, 2011 by  
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Keeping our national parks beautiful should be a nation-wide effort, and the Grand Canyon National Park is hoping to take a step in the new year that would make that easier for everyone by  banning the sale of plastic bottles within the park’s borders. The park has had a plastic bottle ban on its radar for a while now and is currently looking into the feasibility of placing public water refilling stations around the park to make sure visitors keep well hydrated. If the ban is approved and implemented the park would be following in the footsteps of Zion National Park in Utah and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park – two parks that have already put plastic bottle bans in place. Read the rest of Grand Canyon National Park Plans to Ban the Sale of Plastic Bottles in 2012 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: banning plastic bottles , grand canyon , grand canyon national park , grand canyon water fountain , national park bottle ban , National Park Service , plastic bottle , plastic bottle ban , Plastic bottles

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