Stunning green-roofed office harmonizes with the Washington landscape

November 13, 2017 by  
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Stunning, award-winning architecture can be found in unlikely places, even in neighboring areas to industrial processing yards in Yakima, Washington. That’s where you’ll find the Washington Fruit & Produce Co. Headquarters, designed by Graham Baba Architects who describe the project as “an oasis amidst a sea of concrete” that takes cues from the rural landscape. Surrounded by board-formed concrete walls and earthen berms constructed from soil excavated onsite, the light-filled, green-roofed office is filled with natural materials and feels more like a welcoming modern home than a dreary cubicle world. Inspired by the appearance of an aging barn, the 16,500-square-foot Washington Fruit & Produce Co. Headquarters design combines the rural vernacular with a contemporary aesthetic. Exposed trusses and soaring ceilings evoke airy barns, while the 18-foot-tall scissored glulam structural columns—located on the outside for a column-free interior—reinforce the building’s agricultural roots. Full-height glazing wraps the facade to let in light and views of the distant hills while large south-facing overhangs mitigate solar gain. Related: Bloomberg’s new London HQ rated world’s most sustainable office The relatively minimalist interior with its palette of natural materials helps keep the focus on the outdoors, from the berm-wrapped courtyard and accessible green roof to Yakima Valley’s basalt formations and hills. A separate structure houses a 30-foot-long table for communal meals. The Washington Fruit & Produce Co. Headquarters in Yakima won a 2016 Northwest and Pacific Region Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects. + Graham Baba Architects Images via Graham Baba Architects and Kevin Scott/em>

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Stunning green-roofed office harmonizes with the Washington landscape

Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

May 17, 2017 by  
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O’Neill Rose Architects designed a home for a nature loving couple that maximizes the experience of the outdoors. Located in the countryside of Sheffield, Massachusetts, the Undermountain home covers a spacious 3,000 square feet across a linear footprint. The elevated home also allows rainwater to flow underneath through a boulder-strewn rain garden and out to the meadow beyond. Built for a couple who wanted a home where they could age in place, Undermountain was conceived as a single-story building so that the occupants could live comfortably without fear of future mobility issues. To mitigate slope changes on site, the long and rectangular building is anchored into a hill on one side, while stone blocks support the other end above marshy wetland . A boulder-strewn rain garden occupies the gap between the stone blocks. Related: Beautiful Maine home uses passive solar principles to achieve near net-zero energy Inspired by the rural vernacular, Undermountain is clad in vertical strips of ebony-stained cypress and punctuated with large windows that frame key vistas. Rural inspiration and cypress can also be found in the interior, which is contemporary with clean lines and light-filled spaces. The addition of a screened porch allows enjoyment of the outdoors year-round. + O’Neill Rose Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Michael Moran

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Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

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