Three prefab modules make up this contemporary rural home

March 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Three prefab modules make up this contemporary rural home

On a 190-hectare working farm near the NSW city of Orange, Australian modular design company Modscape has completed a new prefab home that takes in dramatic landscape views in all directions. An exercise in efficiency, the 225-square-meter residence was constructed in a controlled factory environment and comprises just three modules. Dubbed Project Kangaroobie, the contemporary home combines floor-to-ceiling glazing, a neutral palette of natural materials and a minimalist design to keep focus on the outdoors.  When the Sydney-based clients of Project Kangaroobie approached Modscape, prefabrication was already at the top of their minds. Because their rural property was a four-hour drive from their primary residence, the clients wanted the home to be built in a controlled environment to eliminate weather-related delays and any difficulties in coordinating multiple trades. Related: A prefab home in Sydney celebrates indoor-outdoor living The three-bedroom, two-bedroom home that Modscape designed and built perfectly complements the clients’ rural land both visually and physically. The new modular home stretches across a ridge to follow the natural topography. Vertical Silvertop Ash timber cladding will develop a silvery patina over time and blend the home into its surrounding landscape. The light-filled interior features a neutral palette of warm timber , Scyon-lined walls and ceramic tiles. Project Kangaroobie’s T-shaped plan creates separate wings for living, sleeping and utilities and opens up to outdoor terraces to the west, south and east. The spatial layout also ensures that the living spaces remain clutter-free to preserve sight lines across the home and toward the landscape. The architects noted, “Windows and doors have been positioned to maximize their effect as frames to the landscape: the low wide window which, when seated, frames a view toward the tree line; the enclosed porch (complete with outdoor fireplace and hammock-hanging hooks) is a perfect vantage point for watching the weather roll up the valley; and the window in the living area perfectly captures the spectacular sunsets.” + Modscape Photography by John Madden via Modscape

View original here:
Three prefab modules make up this contemporary rural home

Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

December 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

Montebelluna-based architecture firm Reisarchitettura, has put a contemporary twist on the traditional countryside vernacular of Southern Italy with the BS House— a modern energy-efficient dwelling in the rural outskirts of Ostuni. Defined by large stone walls and muted natural material palette, the seemingly rustic home boasts a modern interior and energy-efficient systems including home automation technology that allows the homeowners to remotely control the home with their smartphones. To maximize energy savings, the BS House is powered with solar energy as well as an integrated heat pump. Commissioned by a German executive and his journalist wife, the BS House serves as a live-work house rather than a holiday getaway. The clients selected an elevated site with beautiful olive trees and stellar views of the landscape. The design of the house also pays homage to nature through its natural material palette that comprises dry stone and lime plaster for the walls, minimal window frames made of oak wood, and Apricena stone paving; architectural detailing gave these traditional materials a contemporary twist. “The project started from the idea of a central patio, used since antiquity in the hot climate of the southern Mediterranean as passive protection from the sun,” explains the architecture firm of the 170-square-meter home. “The house shaped as a C around the patio facing north to protect the large windows from the hot Apulian sun and enjoy the best view. To the east are the living area and the studio of the owner, in the center the dining area with kitchen and to the west the master bedroom with a second studio for his wife. At the west end is a guest room with separated entrance and services. North of the House, in front of the patio, the swimming pool, with gazebo, services and sauna, overlooks the countryside.” Related: Solar-powered home embraces sustainable design in Chihuahua In anticipation of future business trips, the clients requested that their home be equipped with a KNX home automation system that allows for the remote control of everything from the safety and alarm systems to the air conditioning and lighting. Solar panels power the house as well as the recharging station for the clients’ electric vehicle . + Reisarchitettura Via ArchDaily Images by Alessandra Bello

Read the original here: 
Solar-powered smart home puts a modern spin on rural Italian architecture

How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

December 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

There is no doubt that President Trump has significantly changed environmental policy since taking office that have caused a great deal of public outcry. The current administration’s decisions have affected everything from rolling back on policies enacted by former Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton to cutting funding for different environmental and scientific programs. With so much to keep up with, here is a rundown of the Trump Administration’s environmental action in 2018 and how it has impacted the planet. EPA loosens toxic air pollution regulations A Clinton-era policy known as “once in, always in” or OIAI was an effort to permanently reduce the hazardous air pollution from industrial sources. The law required major sources of pollution to retool their processes and reduce their emissions to lower levels set by industry peers. This was known as Maximum Achievable Control Technology, or MACT, standards. Industry lawyers have long argued that eliminating OIAI would give businesses a stronger incentive to reduce emissions , and in a brief legal memo, Trump’s EPA abruptly dropped OIAI at the beginning of 2018. NASA climate monitoring program cut Back in May, the Trump administration ended NASA’s carbon monitoring system (CMS), which was an effort to improve the monitoring of global carbon emissions. The program cost $10 million a year, but a March 2018 spending deal did not include funding for the program. CMS supported work was relevant to the Paris Agreement because it verified if other nations were meeting their pledges to reduce carbon emissions. But the Trump administration has rejected that agreement and is downsizing the NASA climate science program. Rollbacks proposed for Endangered Species Act rules This summer, the Trump administration proposed to make several key changes to the 1973 Endangered Species Act, including eliminating a rule that forbids referring to the economic impact of listing a threatened species. The changes would still allow for determinations to be based on biological considerations, and they also would give regulators more freedom, so they can avoid designating critical habitat for endangered species . Fuel economy rule change One of the signature climate change policies from President Obama was a plan to increase vehicle mileage standards for cars made during the next decade. However, the Trump administration is dismantling the plan, but not nixing it entirely. President Obama’s plan required light cars made after 2012 to average almost 54 miles per gallon by 2025, with hopes that the new efficiency standards would save billions of barrels of oil . However, President Trump has mileage targets of 34 miles per gallon because some automakers believe anything more than that would be too difficult to reach. Methane rules repealed Another rollback to Obama’s climate change policy, Trump’s EPA reduced the requirements on oil and gas companies to monitor the releases of methane from wells. Some in the industry had complained that the Obama rules were too much of a burden and a “record-keeping nightmare” that was impossible to execute. However, when the EPA announced this new rule, the attorneys general in California and New Mexico filed a lawsuit to challenge the change. EPA air pollution review panel disbanded The Particulate Matter Review Panel – made of scientists who are experts in the health dangers of soot – has advised the EPA over the years about safe levels of air pollution. However, they will no longer meet starting in 2019, but they didn’t reveal why. Conservation groups believe that eliminating the panel will make it easier to roll back pollution standards, but they had also complained that the panel wasn’t robust enough to protect public health. Ocean plastic cleanup bill In October, President Trump signed legislation to improve efforts to clean up plastic trash from the world’s oceans. He also called out nations like China and Japan for using the oceans as landfills and said that he will do everything he can during his Presidency to stop them. The law passed with bipartisan support, and it amended the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Act. It also funded the program through 2022. Arctic offshore drilling approved Earlier this year, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management issued Hilcorp a conditional use permit for its Liberty Project, and they will begin drilling from an artificial island in the Beaufort Sea. The federally controlled waters of the U.S. arctic have been cleared for oil and gas production wells after years of debate about the risks and rewards. Coal power plant rollback In 2015, the Obama Administration adopted a rule restricting carbon dioxide pollution from future power plants. The energy industry criticized the rule, saying the technology was unproven and the required equipment was extremely expensive. So, earlier this month, the Trump administration rolled back the climate rule by lifting some of the restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from coal power plants. The goal is to spur construction of new coal plants and to relieve America’s energy providers of excessive burdens. Via National Geographic Image via Sam Jotham Sutharson

Go here to read the rest:
How environmental policies changed in 2018 under Trump

This tiny shipping container home adapts to your needs

October 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This tiny shipping container home adapts to your needs

The tiny-living movement is thriving for a variety of reasons. An emphasis on minimalism, financial benefits and location freedom top the list. Many people who consider investing in a tiny home worry about size constraints, but the Calico tiny home by Katz Box offers a solution to that concern by offering a shipping container structure that adapts to its residents’ needs. Sustainability drives the Ohio-based Katz Box company with the goal of lowering the environmental impact of housing through reclaimed and recycled shipping containers. On the manufacturing end, the team is also committed to focusing on processing that minimizes waste. Related: Old shipping container repurposed as a 40-foot-tall parking booth In addition to creating an eco-friendly option through upcycling , the Calico design highlights a modular blueprint, meaning that each section of the interior is customizable to suit a variety of functions. An option for commercial or individual needs, the Calico provides a universal model to suit an endless array of demands, yet is completely tailored for a personal touch. The adaptable components don’t stop with the interior modular variations. In fact, this home can grow or shrink with the needs of the family. When more space is required, an additional shipping container or two can be added, making for a thoughtful and completely scalable design. Similarly, when the kids move out and it’s time to minimize, the added shipping containers can be removed. Mobility is another feature of the Calico, which can be relocated with ease. Appealing for the individual who moves often, it’s also an option for retail locations or temporary housing and offices, such as those on construction sites. Katz Box, the passion project company born from the sustainable mindset of owner Tobias Katz, is a relatively new option in the tiny-living movement. Founded in 2017, the objectives of Katz Box are many, including the goals of universal design elements and an accessible price point. Katz Box also aims to employ ultra-efficient building practices such as renewable energy and water conservation. + Katz Box Images via Tobias Katz

More:
This tiny shipping container home adapts to your needs

Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

September 10, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

Although the majority of Vietnam’s population relies on agriculture , rapid industrialization and a skyrocketing population in recent years has led to urban sprawl and the decimation of fertile agricultural land. To combat these trends, local architecture firm H&P Architects has made mending the relationship between people and nature one of the main guiding principles throughout its work. In its latest example of eco-friendly architecture, the firm created AgriNesture, a green housing prototype that can be clustered together in vulnerable rural areas to revitalize the local population. In M?o Khê, a town a few hours from Hanoi in northern Vietnam, sits one of the first prototypes of AgriNesture. Likened to a “cube of earth cut out from a field,” the boxy building is clad in locally sourced materials including plant fibers, rammed earth and bricks. The two-story structure is also built with a reinforced concrete frame — which cost VND 150 million (equivalent to USD 6,500) — and topped with a green roof , where agriculture can be practiced. The structure is also integrated with a rainwater collection system for irrigation. A light well brings natural light and ventilation deep into the home. The AgriNesture structures can be clustered in blocks of four around a central courtyard. These building clusters lend themselves to multipurpose uses, such as multigenerational housing, education, health or community centers. Because the cost-effective architecture only relies on two main parts — the reinforced concrete ‘Frame’ and the locally sourced ‘Cover’ materials — owners will not only be able to select their own surface materials best suited to their local conditions, but also customize the interior to their liking and add additional floors if desired. This hands-on and site-specific building process will help create jobs and bring economic stability, according to the architects. Related: This stunning brick “cave house” in Vietnam is open to the elements “AgriNesture will be, therefore, a place of convergence, interaction and adaptation of various local contrasts (natural vs. man-made, residence vs. agriculture, individuals vs. communities , etc.),” the firm said, “thus enabling it to be not only a Physical space but also a truly Human place.” + H&P Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Nguyen TienThanh

Read the original: 
Eco-friendly AgriNesture buildings promote agriculture and job growth in Vietnam

Larch-clad extension breathes new life into an old hunting lodge in Canada

November 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Larch-clad extension breathes new life into an old hunting lodge in Canada

This quaint hunting lodge in Canada  has had several different lives before being turned into a cozy family home nestled in the woods. The new owners commissioned architect Anik Péloquin to design an extension that would echo the architecture of the original building, while blending in with the stunning surroundings. The resulting two-volume structure is clad in larch wood fits in perfectly and breathes new life into the lodge. The small house, located on a secluded lakeside lot in La Malbaie, Canada, was used as a hunting lodge for the first three decades, before becoming the summer home for the Sisters of Charity. Instead of renovating the house, the new owners decided to build an additional space and use the existing structure as a guesthouse . Related: Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall The two volumes as referred to as siblings, with the new house–“the little sister”–housing two bedrooms, a bathroom, kitchen and lounge areas. Modest in size, the structure keeps with the general look of its “big sister”. It is clad in larch and features a steep shed roof that harmonizes with the existing structure and the landscape. The roof overhang on the west and south sides keep the outside walls low and consistent with the scale of the old house. The steep roof pitch rises on the east and north side and reminds of a church steeple, thus evoking the history of the site. + Anik Péloquin architecte Via V2com Photos by Louis Prud’homme

See more here:
Larch-clad extension breathes new life into an old hunting lodge in Canada

Cards Against Humanity buys land on the US-Mexico border to block Trump’s wall

November 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Cards Against Humanity buys land on the US-Mexico border to block Trump’s wall

You may have gotten some laughs from the irreverent Cards Against Humanity game in the past, but now the people behind the “party game for horrible people” have a higher objective: stop Donald Trump’s border wall. The company bought land on the border and worked with a law firm to make it harder for the Trump administration to act on its plan – and they asked fans to chip in $15 for a piece of the land in their new Cards Against Humanity Saves America campaign. Cards Against Humanity doesn’t want to see a United States-Mexico border wall erected, so they’re working to thwart Trump with their recent land purchase. On their campaign page, they said, “Donald Trump is a preposterous golem who is afraid of Mexicans. He is so afraid that he wants to build a twenty-billion dollar wall that everyone knows will accomplish nothing. So we’ve purchased a plot of vacant land on the border and retained a law firm specializing in eminent domain to make it as time-consuming and expensive as possible for the wall to get built.” Related: Provocative street art installation shows baby peering over US-Mexico border wall Those who gave Cards Against Humanity $15 earned “six America-saving surprises” during the holidays. The company has been quiet about most of the surprises, but they did say backers could expect an illustrated map of the land they purchased, new cards, and a certificate of their promise to battle Trump’s border wall. Other surprises are set to be delivered in December. The campaign seems to have resonated with Americans – The Washington Post reported it sold out in hours. This isn’t the first time Cards Against Humanity has gotten political , using humor to draw attention to current issues. For example, earlier this year they created a Weed Pack and donated proceeds to the Marijuana Public Policy Project to fight for legalization. They also sent potatoes to Republican Wisconsin senator Ron Johnson to persuade him to hold a town hall about the Affordable Care Act. + Cards Against Humanity Saves America Images via Cards Against Humanity Saves America and Anthony Albright on Flickr

See the original post:
Cards Against Humanity buys land on the US-Mexico border to block Trump’s wall

Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

May 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

O’Neill Rose Architects designed a home for a nature loving couple that maximizes the experience of the outdoors. Located in the countryside of Sheffield, Massachusetts, the Undermountain home covers a spacious 3,000 square feet across a linear footprint. The elevated home also allows rainwater to flow underneath through a boulder-strewn rain garden and out to the meadow beyond. Built for a couple who wanted a home where they could age in place, Undermountain was conceived as a single-story building so that the occupants could live comfortably without fear of future mobility issues. To mitigate slope changes on site, the long and rectangular building is anchored into a hill on one side, while stone blocks support the other end above marshy wetland . A boulder-strewn rain garden occupies the gap between the stone blocks. Related: Beautiful Maine home uses passive solar principles to achieve near net-zero energy Inspired by the rural vernacular, Undermountain is clad in vertical strips of ebony-stained cypress and punctuated with large windows that frame key vistas. Rural inspiration and cypress can also be found in the interior, which is contemporary with clean lines and light-filled spaces. The addition of a screened porch allows enjoyment of the outdoors year-round. + O’Neill Rose Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Michael Moran

Read the original:
Cypress home embedded in the landscape lets rainwater flow underneath

Howe Farm is an air-tight timber-clad farmhouse with a fresh new design

March 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Howe Farm is an air-tight timber-clad farmhouse with a fresh new design

Read the rest of Howe Farm is an air-tight timber-clad farmhouse with a fresh new design

More here:
Howe Farm is an air-tight timber-clad farmhouse with a fresh new design

Bad Behavior has blocked 1169 access attempts in the last 7 days.