40 earthquakes hit Mount St. Helens in 4 days

January 5, 2018 by  
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Mount St. Helens has been quaking, with 40 earthquakes – the most powerful of which was a 3.9 – in just four days. Since the largest earthquake , which struck Wednesday night around midnight local time, smaller earthquakes have shaken the area every half hour. Researchers believe they could be related to activity within the nearby volcano. Earthquakes are not unusual around Mount St. Helens; it has been seismically active since records began. And while the largest quake and most recent activity are likely due to volcanic activity, some of the rumblings from the first two days of the year are probably related to regional stress and not the volcano itself. Related: NASA considers puncturing Yellowstone supervolcano to save life on Earth Geologists can determine whether an earthquake is related to the volcano by looking at where the quakes originate. Rumbling on the Mount St. Helen’s axis is usually caused by the active volcanic system, whereas other earthquakes are aligned with regional faults. Although Mount St. Helens is an active volcano, scientists don’t expect this activity to result in an eruption anytime soon. It’s been 38 years since the last eruption in 1980 (with several smaller eruptions as recently as 10 years ago). Via Forbes Images via Deposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

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40 earthquakes hit Mount St. Helens in 4 days

London store recycles 60,000 plastic bottles for 3D-printed interior

January 5, 2018 by  
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You can tell that Bottletop , a “sustainable luxury” brand that transforms castoff materials into chic carryalls, takes its zero-waste philosophy to heart. Case in point? Its new flagship store on London’s Regent Street, which boasts a 3D-printed interior derived almost entirely from recycled plastic bottles . Together with Krause Architects and Ai Build , Bottletop conscripted a troop of Kuka robots to print sections of the boutique using a filament made from plastic waste gathered from the streets Delhi in India. There’s a social component to the process, too. ReFlow , the Netherlands-based company that makes the filament, says it reinvests part of its profits into local manufacturing projects. “Our mission is to significantly improve the lives of the nearly 40 million waste collectors worldwide who earn less than $2 a day and to create a global, socially responsible 3D-printing community,” ReFlow says on its website. Related: 3D-printed pod homes for the homeless could hang from NYC buildings Inspired by the work of Paolo Zilli, a senior associate at Zaha Hadid Architects , the Bottletop store is a “world-first in retail” that “contributes to a broader positive ecosystem, in line with the values … of sustainable luxury, ethical design, technical innovation, and cross-cultural collaboration,” the company says in a statement. The recycled plastic isn’t the store’s only sustainable element, either. Look down and you’ll find that the flooring is composed of recycled rubber tires; glance up and you’ll discover a canopy made up of thousands of used metal cans suspended within a 3D-printed filigree. Related: World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens in the Netherlands The store is a work in progress—literally. The KUKA robots are still hard at work producing whole segments, meaning that the space will evolve over time. You can even take home a piece of the store, in a manner of speaking: For a limited time, customers will be able to employ an on-site robot to print personalized bag charms using the ReFlow filament. “For the first time, visitors to our store will be able to witness the sustainable use of this technology first hand while shopping the Bottletop collection and learning about the mission of the brand,” the company says. “This is so exciting for us as our customers can watch the transformation of the store.” + Bottletop

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London store recycles 60,000 plastic bottles for 3D-printed interior

YouTuber designs a DIY solar device to help power Puerto Rico

January 5, 2018 by  
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Swaths of Puerto Rico still lack electricity . Jehu Garcia, film-making equipment company owner and YouTuber , wondered how he could help. He’s built his own do-it-yourself version of a Powerwall , and tackled the Puerto Rico power issue with his technical know-how by building a solar generator , and providing information for others to also build the DIY generators. Garcia created a solar generator , which he explained in his video is “essentially a small, lightweight, portable Powerwall .” The solar generator is a box “containing batteries , an inverter, a solar charge controller, and all kinds of different connectors to get the power in and out.” His 13-minute video details how to make the device, and the text below includes links to the various components a builder would need – costing around $550, a figure which includes the cost of a solar panel , an extension cord to connect the device to the panel, and around six light bulbs. “This is a complete system ready to deploy in Puerto Rico to light up a home and to give at least power communications or medical devices,” Garcia said in his video. The device can be equipped to offer around one kilowatt-hours worth of battery. Related: More than 20 organizations launch Solar Saves Lives to power clinics and food markets in Puerto Rico Garcia called for people to build the solar generators, and send completed devices or parts to Javier Camacho, a contact of Garcia’s in Puerto Rico. Camacho recorded a video sharing his experience on the island, saying, “We are at the mercy of the people that can actually put the grid on – or, we could help them. We could make something.” Camacho has access to a maker space, according to Garcia, with people who could build the solar generators. OZY reported there have been 15 installations so far. + Jehu Garcia on YouTube Images via Jehu Garcia on Instagram ( 1 , 2 )

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YouTuber designs a DIY solar device to help power Puerto Rico

Google and BIG unveil designs for new green-roofed tech campus in Sunnyvale

January 5, 2018 by  
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Google and BIG have teamed up for yet another massive and spectacular Google campus—this time in Sunnyvle’s Moffett Park. Google recently unveiled plans for a new BIG-designed campus last month, following the acclaimed architecture firm’s work on Google’s Mountain View and London campuses . Located on Caribbean Drive, the 1.04-million-square-foot project could accommodate 4,500 employees and feature eye-catching terraced buildings topped with accessible green roofs. Designed to foster community and healthy living, Google’s new Sunnyvale campus will be flush with green space including on its roof. Unsurprisingly, the project will target LEED Gold and is expected to rack up points through its native, low-irrigation landscape and promotion of eco-friendly transit like cycling to work. Related: Google unveils giant green ‘landscraper’ for London HQ The massive site could also accommodate more than just office space. “Housing is part of our thought process in Moffett Park,” Mark Golan, chief operating officer of Google’s global real estate investments & development unit, told The Mercury News . “A new mixed-use community where you have live-work capabilities, makes a lot of sense. Housing and transportation are two huge issues for the Valley overall, and they are huge issues for Google. One of the best ways to address this is by creating mixed-use communities that allow people to live close to where they work, which allows for a vibrant community and also helps the transportation.” The project is not expected for completion until 2021 at the earliest. + BIG Via ArchDaily Images via Google

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Google and BIG unveil designs for new green-roofed tech campus in Sunnyvale

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