LEED Gold house puts a modern twist on historic Aspen architecture

May 17, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm Rowland + Broughton designed Game On, a stunning modern home sensitive to historic context and the environment in Aspen, Colorado. Crafted as a contemporary take on the West End neighborhood’s late 19th century architecture, the elegant new home uses smart technology to achieve LEED Gold certification. Solar panels power over half of Game On’s energy needs and stormwater management is seamlessly integrated into the design. Since Game On is located in a historic neighborhood, the architects prioritized site context in the design process to achieve approval from the City of Aspen’s Historic Preservation Commission . The original site contained a historic miner’s cabin that the architects preserved but moved to the northwest corner. The relocation allowed the lot to be split in half with the new build located on the southern half. The architects designed the new home with white fiber-cement siding for a clean and contemporary appearance and also added a traditional front porch and gabled roof to reference the neighborhood’s historic context. The 4,291-square-foot home consists of the main dwelling and a detached garage. The home is optimized for entertaining thanks to its open-plan layout that can accommodate a large number of guests. “Pure in form and with modern articulation, it’s modern and efficient with no unused space,” wrote the architects. Related: Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis The LEED Gold-certified home is outfitted with home automation technology and powered by solar panels mounted on the garage roof. The interior features natural materials , energy-efficient fixtures, and eco-friendly finishes free of harmful chemicals. The house design minimized erosion and site impact during construction. Stormwater runoff is managed onsite and drained into the bocce ball court, which filters the water before it flows to the aquifer. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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LEED Gold house puts a modern twist on historic Aspen architecture

Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

May 5, 2017 by  
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Nature lovers will feel right at home with Black Magic. Designed by Colorado-based Rowland + Broughton , this glass-clad mountainside home embraces the landscape and gives homeowners the impression of sitting among the trees even when indoors. Coupled with Snowmass, Colorado’s lush surroundings, the contemporary dwelling’s clean lines and airy feel appears like a “penthouse living in a mountain oasis.” When Rowland + Broughton was asked to design the Black Magic house from scratch, they created the self-imposed restriction to minimize site disturbance as much as possible. Thus the project’s first step began with careful siting and working with existing topography to reduce site excavation. The project is rewarded with close proximity to native grasses and mature fir, oak, and aspen trees. Related: Prefab Pyrenees cabin minimizes site impact and building costs Black Magic is clad in a black metal corrugated skin that contrast with the leafy mountainside. Large windows punctuate the black metal facade to frame views of the outdoors and bathe the white oak-lined interior in natural light. The Black Magic home spans two levels with two bedrooms, a storage area, garage, and laundry room on the ground floor. The best views in the home are enjoyed from the upper floor, which contains the master suite on one end and an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room on the other. The living room opens up to a south-facing outdoor deck. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

May 5, 2017 by  
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Serving the community goes hand in hand with serving the environment at this police station in Cincinnati. The Ohio city is home to the world’s first freestanding net-zero energy police station that’s also the first of its kind to earn LEED Platinum certification. Designed by local firm emersion DESIGN , the Cincinnati District 3 Police Station Headquarters is a beautiful facility that not only produces as much energy as it consumes, but also beautifies the community with public art and rainwater. Unveiled in July 2015 in the city’s Westwood neighborhood, the 39,000-square-foot District 3 Police Station Headquarters houses nearly 200 employees. Forty geothermal wells and a 330-kW solar array power the energy-efficient building, which consumes half the power used by traditionally built facilities of the same size. Since the building consumes less energy than it generates—the energy use intensity is 28 kBtu per square foot—the building is expected to save the city a significant amount of taxpayer money over the years. Related: BIG unveils plans for NYPD’s first-ever green-roofed police station The net-zero energy building was also designed with considerable community input, from the new station’s location to the selection of public art. As part of the state’s 1 Percent Art Program, the police station includes an LED art installation that tells the story of the district’s 14 neighborhoods. Generous amounts of glazing clad the station and create a sense of transparency with the community. The landscaping around the building incorporates native plantings and includes beautiful stormwater management design, such as rainwater gardens and a stone ‘river’ bioswale. + emersion DESIGN

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Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town

April 29, 2017 by  
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Bigert & Bergström just unveiled the Solar Egg, a giant golden sauna located in the town of Luossabacken, Sweden. The golden egg concept was hatched for the country’s northernmost town to provide residents with a toasty meeting place deep in the snow-covered landscape. The mining town of Kiruna is currently facing radical changes; the entire city is moving so that a mining company can extract more iron from underneath its landscape. Mining has been an essential part of the isolated town since the 19th century and the industry is vital to its existence. However, many are debating this dependence on iron mining – especially granted its impact on the environment and the town’s well-being. This issue inspired the Swedish designers from Bigert & Bergström to create the Solar Egg as a warm social meeting place where residents can debate the town’s future, or as they put it, “prompt thoughts of rebirth.” Related: Solar-powered Ecocapsule lets you live off-the-grid anywhere in the world The Solar Egg is made of stainless mirror sheeting that contrasts with the snowy landscape. The shimmering panels reflect and break up the surroundings into mirrored fragmented images – a design feature meant to represent the complexities that come with “heated” debates about climate change and sustainable living . The egg’s interior walls are clad in honeycomb wood panels that give the egg its pod-like shape. LED lighting illuminates the interior, and a large wood-heated, heart-shaped sauna stove made out of iron and stone sits in the middle of the space, providing a warm temperature of anywhere between 75° and 85° C. The Solar Egg is a part of Bigert & Bergström’s strategy to incorporate artwork into climate discussions – an initiative that began with the team’s Climate Chambers project in 1994. + Studio Bigert & Bergström Photography by Jean-Baptiste Béranger

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Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town

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