Bjarke Ingels Group unveils plans for massive solar-powered sports complex in Austin

December 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

They say everything is bigger in Texas, but the state’s newest sports arena is going to be really BIG. Bjarke Ingels Group just unveiled plans for the new East Austin District, a solar-powered sports and entertainment center that will include the city’s first pro sports stadium and large-scale music arena. The modern complex will be topped with a series of red photovoltaic roofs in a checkerboard layout. The massive 1.3 million-square-foot complex will be located east of downtown Austin, at the current site of Rodeo Austin. Once complete, the space will host various sporting and musical events at the 40,000-seat pro-sports stadium and 15,000-seat arena. Additionally on site will be work spaces, youth centers, medical facilities, convention space and an abundance of hospitality amenities across the entire campus. Related: BIG’s looping station design in Paris turns bridge into public space The general design of the buildings is inspired by local cultural roots of Texas and Austin. Using a Jefferson Grid-style approach, the individual buildings will be arranged in a checkerboard layout, creating latticed rooftop appearance from above. Each individual roof will designate distinct functions of the space below. The rooftop will be equipped with red photovoltaic panels to provide clean energy to the complex and potentially provide energy to the city of Austin as well. BIG, who will be working in collaboration with Austin-based architects STG Design , designed the complex to be a vibrant modern space that blends into the city’s unique urban character, “Like a collective campus rather than a monolithic stadium, the East Austin District unifies all the elements of rodeo and soccer into a village of courtyards and canopies. Embracing Austin’s local character and culture, the East Austin District is a single destination composed of many smaller structures under one roof. Part architecture, part urbanism, part landscape – the East Austin District is the architectural manifestation of collective intimacy – a complex capable of making tens of thousands of fans come together and enjoy the best Austin has to offer inside and between its buildings.” explains Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner, BIG. + Bjarke Ingels Group Images by Bjarke Ingels Group

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Bjarke Ingels Group unveils plans for massive solar-powered sports complex in Austin

Believed tomb of Jesus Christ is far older than previously thought

December 7, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Scientists have discovered that the tomb in which Jesus Christ is believed to have been buried after his crucifixion is significantly older than previously known. According to results given to National Geographic , archaeologists tested a sample of mortar taken from a limestone tomb beneath the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem and found the cave dates back 345 CE. Previous evidence had indicated that the cave, the oldest architectural structure on site, was built during the Crusader period, around 1000 CE. According to historical records, the tomb is thought to have been rediscovered, after a period of obscurity, by the Romans in 326 CE. This rediscovery occurred during the reign of Constantine, the Roman leader who converted the Empire to Christianity. The recent discovery was made possible by the tomb’s opening on October 26, 2016. Within the tomb, scientists were surprised to discover an older, fractured marble slab, which rested on the original limestone surface of the “burial bed,” where it is believed that Jesus’s body was placed. Some researchers suspected that this older marble may have been placed during the Crusader Period, while others believed that the slab may have been even older. Upon further testing, it was determined that the slab dated back to Constantine-era Jerusalem. In order to determine the tomb’s age, scientists analyzed chemicals found within the slab to determine how long it is has been since they were last exposed to light. It was also discovered that a significant portion of the tomb remains sealed off. Related: Pope Francis Officially Endorses Evolution and The Big Bang Theory The Church of the Holy Sepulcher and the caves below it have undergone great changes over the millennia. Following the discovery and reconstruction of the tomb in the 4th century, the Church was completely destroyed in 1099, then subsequently rebuilt. This destruction led scientists to question whether the site could ever be conclusively identified as the location, as determined by the Constantine-era Romans, of Christ’s tomb. While there is no archaeological evidence to suggest that the historical Jesus of Nazareth was buried in the tomb, the recent discoveries help to clarify the complex history surrounding Christianity’s holiest shrine. Via National Geographic Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Believed tomb of Jesus Christ is far older than previously thought

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