Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks

March 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks

Archi-Union Architects have completed an unusual art exhibition space in Shanghai with the help of robots. Created for the Chi She artist group, the building in the city’s Xuhui district was built with recycled gray-green bricks salvaged from a former building. Designed with both traditional and contemporary elements, the Chi She exhibition space features an unusual protrusion made possible with advanced digital fabrication technology. The 200-square-meter Chi She exhibition space was built to replace a former historic building, the materials of which were salvaged and reused in the new construction. While the zigzagging roof has been raised and reconstructed from timber, the most eye-catching difference between the old and new buildings is the part of the wall above the entrance door that bulges out. The architects used a robotic masonry fabrication technique developed by Fab-Union to create the curved wall, which would have been difficult to precisely achieve with traditional means. Related: WeWork’s new coworking space in Shanghai features salvaged materials from the city’s past “The precise positioning of the integrated equipment of robotic masonry fabrication technique and the construction elaborately to the mortar and bricks by the craftsmen makes this ancient material, brick, be able to meet the requirements in the new era, and realizes the presentation of the design model consummately,” wrote the architects. “The dilapidation of these old bricks coordinated with the stretch display of the curving walls are narrating a connection between people and bricks, machines and construction, design and culture, which will be spread permanently in the shadow of external walls under the setting sun.” + Archi-Union Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Su Shengliang

See the original post:
Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks

Meet Gita, an intelligent autonomous cargo robot that can carry your stuff

February 8, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Meet Gita, an intelligent autonomous cargo robot that can carry your stuff

https://youtu.be/OVRI7pEmKkg At just 22-inches-tall, Gita (meaning “fast trip” in Italian) can move at speeds up to 22 miles per hour, with the capacity to carry up to 40 pounds and a zero turning radius that lets it navigate easily through even the most complex environments. It also has a communicative personality along with the ability to learn and navigate both indoors and out, provided it has the guidance of a human. When on the move, it can either follow you as you walk, or navigate independently in places it is familiar with. Related: Chrysler unveils all-electric self-driving Portal car “designed by millennials for millennials” In terms of its design, it features a sleek and shiny surface, with compartments that barely show their presence. It has large rubber tire treats, with LED lights embedded that illuminate in various colors, along with cameras positioned throughout the body to help Gita navigate. According to Kris Naudus at Engadget, Gita’s main compartment was big enough to store his work backpack and contents, including a 14-inch notebook computer laid flat, with some room to spare on the edges. For those seeking to lug larger loads, Piaggio is currently working on Gita’s sibling, Kilo, which will be able to carry up to 200 pounds. Gita is currently not available to purchase, but Piaggio Fast Forward is in the process of sending the helpers out on business-to-business missions, with an eye toward consumer applications. + Piaggio Fast Forward Via Businesswire and Engadget, Images via Piaggio Fast Forward

Original post: 
Meet Gita, an intelligent autonomous cargo robot that can carry your stuff

Elon Musk says well need a universal basic income when all jobs are automated

November 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Elon Musk says well need a universal basic income when all jobs are automated

In a recent interview with CNBC , SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk discussed the future of work, where many of us may not have jobs at all. As more and more positions become automated by software or robots, Musk says, world governments will eventually have to step up: “There is a pretty good chance we end up with a universal basic income, or something like that, due to automation. Yeah, I am not sure what else one would do. I think that is what would happen.” The idea of a universal basic income is not new. Earlier this year, Swiss voters were asked whether or not all citizens should receive 2,500 Swiss francs ($2,578 US) per month. Ultimately, the plan was rejected at the ballot box, but the fact that it was brought to a national level has many considering the idea. Finland, for instance, is already gearing up to test a universal basic income experiment involving 8,000 people. The sum these citizens could receive is far shy of what was proposed in Switzerland – only 800 Euros per month – and during the trial period the amount will be even lower. A similar test in planned for the Dutch city of Utrecht in 2017 will provide 250 residents with a flat sum of 960 Euros monthly. While the idea is gaining traction in Europe, American politicians have been more cautious. President Obama addressed the idea in an interview this summer, saying it was a debate that would be had “over the next 10 or 20 years.” Related: 20 Dutch cities plan to roll out guaranteed basic income for residents in 2016 While it’s easy to get swept up into a sense of doom and gloom at the idea of robots stealing our jobs, Musk goes on to elaborate in the interview that there are benefits to this type of increased automation: “People will have time to do other things, more complex things, more interesting things. Certainly more leisure time.” Though tech CEOs like Musk may see complete automation as the ultimate outcome of their work, others disagree. Blogger Eve Peyser at Gizmodo writes, “Sure, jobs will become obsolete, but we can utilize the technology we invent to create new jobs. Especially in the United States, we define ourselves by our labor; your labor and its fruits determine every aspect of your identity.” In the end, it’s impossible to say exactly what the workforce of the future will look like, or what it will mean. For now, anyway. Via Gizmodo Images via 401(K) 2012 and OnInnovation  

The rest is here:
Elon Musk says well need a universal basic income when all jobs are automated

Shape-shifting "apartment in a box" by MIT and Yves Bhar hits stores next year

July 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Shape-shifting "apartment in a box" by MIT and Yves Bhar hits stores next year

https://vimeo.com/173697166 Particularly useful in very small spaces , Ori is comprised of oh-so-many moving parts. In a unit roughly the footprint of a twin-size bed, Ori contains a sleeping surface, closet, drawers, workstation, and lots of additional storage. After the prototype was created in 2014, the Ori team set about field testing the unit by installing a few in Boston apartments and then renting them out via Airbnb. About 30 guests were able to test out the Ori unit, play with its controls and features, and report back about what they loved and what they didn’t. Related: Watch this MIT researcher triple the size of a 200-square-foot apartment using Minority Report-like gestures The study helped inform the final commercial design for Ori, which will go into mass production this year and most likely hit the market in 2017. (A queen bed model of the transforming unit will also be available.) Some of the functionality has been tweaked for universal appeal. For instance, the original robotic prototype could be controlled with the wave of a hand or a simple voice command, not unlike what we see in science fiction movies. The final product excludes that feature and will instead be controlled from a button panel located on one side of the unit. However, the makers recognize that some users are more advanced than others, so each unit will have smartphone capabilities that allow development of custom apps in the future. The team called on San Francisco-based designer to create a more aesthetic appeal for the robotic fixture. Béhar said in a statement that the Ori unit will be available in a variety of customized finishes, materials, and colors, and will make “studio city living a practical, comfortable, and beautiful experience.” Perhaps the best part? Never having to make the bed since, as the designer points out, it will be “automatically made by having it glide away and disappear.” + Ori Systems + Yves Béhar Via Fast Company Images via Ori

More: 
Shape-shifting "apartment in a box" by MIT and Yves Bhar hits stores next year

MIT is 3D printing fully-functional robots that can walk right off the printer

April 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MIT is 3D printing fully-functional robots that can walk right off the printer

MIT researchers just made a giant leap for robot-kind, by creating a working robot using 3D-printing . The breakthrough could lead to a world of ready-made machines that come off the production line needing only a motor and a battery. The initial prototype is tiny, but demonstrates that a 3D printer with inkjet nozzles can work together to print both liquid and solids, with a little help from UV light. Read the rest of MIT is 3D printing fully-functional robots that can walk right off the printer

Originally posted here:
MIT is 3D printing fully-functional robots that can walk right off the printer

Watch a team of robots 3D-print a suite of curious curved chairs

February 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Watch a team of robots 3D-print a suite of curious curved chairs

Read the rest of Watch a team of robots 3D-print a suite of curious curved chairs

Go here to read the rest: 
Watch a team of robots 3D-print a suite of curious curved chairs

LEED Gold BBVA Bancomer HQ is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

February 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LEED Gold BBVA Bancomer HQ is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

Read the rest of LEED Gold BBVA Bancomer HQ is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

Go here to read the rest: 
LEED Gold BBVA Bancomer HQ is a beacon of sustainability in Mexico City

World’s first robot-run farm to churn out 11 million heads of lettuce per year

February 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on World’s first robot-run farm to churn out 11 million heads of lettuce per year

A Japanese company is preparing to open the world’s first robot-controlled farm. Designed to produce 11 million heads of lettuce each year, the new farm is expecting to ship its first head of lettuce in Fall, 2017. Relying on lessons learned from their first farm in Kameoka, SPREAD says their new business model will cut labor costs by 50 percent. The company claims sustainability is at the heart of what they do, and that the new 47,300 square feet Vegetable Factory in Kansai Science City will also reduce construction costs by 25 percent and energy demand by 30 percent. Read the rest of World’s first robot-run farm to churn out 11 million heads of lettuce per year

Read the original here: 
World’s first robot-run farm to churn out 11 million heads of lettuce per year

Dubai firefighters now have jetpacks in their arsenal

November 16, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Dubai firefighters now have jetpacks in their arsenal

If you’re disappointed that it’s almost 2016 and you don’t have your jetpack yet, don’t despair. Firefighters in Dubai will be getting theirs soon and yours might not be too far behind. Calling them a “practical solution” to fighting fire among the city’s massively tall skyscrapers, the city has ordered 20 jetpacks for their first responders to use in emergency situations. Read the rest of Dubai firefighters now have jetpacks in their arsenal

Original post:
Dubai firefighters now have jetpacks in their arsenal

Greek teen becomes the youngest person to build a life-size functional 3D robot

November 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Greek teen becomes the youngest person to build a life-size functional 3D robot

Fifteen-year-old Dimitris Hatzis of Greece has become the youngest person on Earth to create a functional, life-size, 3D-printed robot that looks and acts surprisingly like its human inventor. It wasn’t a weekend hobby just for kicks, though. The teen was the youngest participant in ‘ InMoov ’, an open source project run by French sculptor and designer Gael Langevin. Hatzis spent more than 1,400 hours over the course of a year to plan, build, and perfect “Troopy,” his 3D-printed pal. Read the rest of Greek teen becomes the youngest person to build a life-size functional 3D robot

More here: 
Greek teen becomes the youngest person to build a life-size functional 3D robot

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1081 access attempts in the last 7 days.