How Automakers are Driving the Future of Net-Zero Building

October 16, 2017 by  
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The path forward for net-zero buildings will come from the road in the form of electric vehicles. Yet EVs still comprise less than one percent of the global market. This is about to change as automakers boost volume in the next few years. Daimler, for one, is unveiling the EQ brand and committing to ten all-EV models by 2025. For context, Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates that one in four vehicles sold globally will be EVs by 2030.

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How Automakers are Driving the Future of Net-Zero Building

Harriet Langford, The Ray

October 16, 2017 by  
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Harriet Langford, The Ray

How chickens are powering the circular economy

July 27, 2017 by  
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Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the renewable energy plant that’s turning its waste into electricity. Sponsored

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How chickens are powering the circular economy

Hilton Launches Largest Mattress Recycling Initiative to Date

March 2, 2017 by  
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Hotels offer a great sleeping solution when you’re on the road, but all those beds mean a whole lot of mattresses that need to be responsibly disposed of once they’re past their useful life. That’s why the 1,574-room Hilton…

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Hilton Launches Largest Mattress Recycling Initiative to Date

Stanford researchers pioneer world’s first affordable urea battery

February 13, 2017 by  
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Stanford University researchers have designed a new battery that could revolutionize renewable energy storage . Using urea , an affordable, natural and readily available material found in mammal urine and fertilizers, their battery is notably more efficient than past iterations. The battery, developed by Stanford chemistry professor Honjie Dai and doctoral candidate Michael Angell, uses an electrolyte made from urea – a material already produced in mass industrial quantities for use in plant fertilizers. Non-flammable and made with electrodes from abundant materials like aluminum and graphite, the battery presents a low-cost way for storing energy from many sources – including renewables . “So essentially, what you have is a battery made with some of the cheapest and most abundant materials you can find on Earth. And it actually has good performance,” says Dai in a press release. “Who would have thought you could take graphite, aluminum, urea, and actually make a battery that can cycle for a pretty long time?” Dai and his team were the first to make a rechargeable aluminum battery in 2015, which charged in less than a minute, while lasting for thousands of charge-discharge cycles. And they’ve improved on both the performance and cost of their latest model, which is about 100 times cheaper than the 2015 battery, with a higher efficiency of 1,500 charge-discharge cycles and a charging time of 45 minutes. This is also the first time that urea has been used to make a battery. Related: MIT researchers invent ingestible battery powered by stomach acid Energy storage is a huge challenge for solar power and other renewables, as users need a reliable way to store power for when their systems aren’t producing energy. The batteries currently on the market, including lithium ion and lead-acid batteries tend to be quite costly and don’t last that long. But Dai and Angell believe their battery might be the solution to the conundrum of renewable energy storage. “It’s cheap. It’s efficient. Grid storage is the main goal,” says Angell. “I would feel safe if my backup battery in my house is made of urea with little chance of causing fire,” added Dai. The researchers have licensed their battery patents to AB Systems, a company founded by Dai, and a commercial version of the battery is on the way. They’re planning to work on increasing its life span down the road by further investigating its internal chemical processes. Via Stanford Images via Pexels , US Navy and Tea Horse Trade Guest House , Wikimedia Commons

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Stanford researchers pioneer world’s first affordable urea battery

Repaired sinkhole in Japan is sinking again

November 28, 2016 by  
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Earlier in November a sinkhole that ravaged a five-lane intersection in the city of Fukuoka, Japan was rapidly fixed and reopened in just a week. But now part of the repaired street has shown signs of sinking again. Around a 30 square meter, or 322 square foot, area, on the roadhttp://inhabitat.com/tag/road/”> road> sunk seven centimeters, or 2.7 inches. The sinkhole in Japan, which was near the JR Hakata Station, was repaired in around 48 hours , filled in with cement and sand. Only a week after the sinkhole closed the road, officials reopened the street. Fukuoka mayor Soichiro Takashima said the repaired road was 30 times stronger than it had been previously. Experts said new subway construction had likely led to the large sinkhole. Related: Japanese fix massive city sinkhole within 48 hours But over the weekend, officials discovered the road sunk 2.7 inches across 322 square feet. No one was injured by the newly sinking road, nor were there any gas leaks or power outages caused by the new sinking. Officials closed the road at around 1:45 AM local time, but reopened the area almost four hours later at 5:30 AM local time, according to Channel NewsAsia. Authorities determined the small sink wasn’t dangerous for people walking or driving on the road. Officials told CNN they had expected some movement after the sinkhole was fixed, and Takashima apologized on Facebook for not letting locals know that the road could sink once more. He said officials would continue to monitor the area. A government spokesperson told local news that when the cement mixed with special soil compressed, the motion could have caused the small sinking. The original sinkhole was 98 feet long, 88 feet wide, and almost 50 feet deep . No one was seriously hurt, yet the sound of a ” loud boom ” startled locals as the sinkhole opened. Fukuoka is home to around 1.5 million people, and is the fifth biggest city in Japan. Via CNN and Channel NewsAsia Images via Soichiro Takashima Facebook ( 1 , 2 )

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Repaired sinkhole in Japan is sinking again

Tesla is voluntarily recalling every Model S on the road

November 23, 2015 by  
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Tesla is voluntarily recalling every single Model S on the road after one seat belt came apart. No one was hurt in the original incident and Tesla hasn’t been able to replicate the problem in any of the 3,000 cars in their possession that haven’t yet hit the road. According to the company, the cost of the move isn’t important, just the safety of their customers. Read the rest of Tesla is voluntarily recalling every Model S on the road

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Tesla is voluntarily recalling every Model S on the road

The companies steering self-driving cars toward reality

October 29, 2015 by  
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Tesla, Cruise and Nauto are among the businesses looking to retrofit cars already on the road with advanced autonomous controls.

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The companies steering self-driving cars toward reality

5 signs the private sector is stepping up on climate change

October 29, 2015 by  
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Green bonds, internal carbon pricing and signs of nervous investors are among the indicators that the private sector is rapidly adjusting to climate change.

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5 signs the private sector is stepping up on climate change

Juneau makes strides in electric transportation

October 29, 2015 by  
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With plentiful hydropower and a thriving tourist industry, Alaska’s capital is an ideal place for electric vehicles.

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Juneau makes strides in electric transportation

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