21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding

August 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding

Twenty-one rare one-horned rhinoceros died after monsoon rains flooded India’s Kaziranga National Park this week. The rhinos that perished were among 270 animals killed in the floodwaters, which covered 80 percent of the Unesco World Heritage Site in the far eastern region of India. Eight rhino calves belonging to the rare species were rescued, although some are reportedly in critical condition. It may be some time before the full effects of the disaster are known. The drowning deaths mark a devastating loss for the one-horned species known as Rhinoceros unicornis , as some 70 percent of the global population of these rare rhinos live in the national park. Of those killed, ten were calves between two and six months old. Wildlife workers and volunteers rescued eight other calves from the floodwaters using ropes, and most of the survivors are being cared for at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation. Related: Can cameras embedded in rhino horns catch poachers? According to World Wildlife Fund estimates from earlier this year, just 3,500 of these rare one-horned rhinos remained. Kaziranga wildlife official Rathin Barman reports that the rescued calves are being treated for dehydration and distress, and will be released after two years. Meanwhile, park officials are assessing the losses and surveying other flood-related damage in the park. “Some 270 wild animals have died, this has been one of the worst seasons of flooding,” Kaziranga National Park director Satyendra Singh told Sky News. “The devastation to the park’s infrastructure, roads, and bridges has been very severe.” Singh said Friday that 30 percent of the 166-square-mile park remains flooded . Via Independent Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 )

See original here: 
21 rare one-horned Indian rhinos drown in monsoon flooding

China makes it illegal to eat endangered species

July 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on China makes it illegal to eat endangered species

A new law in China makes it illegal to eat members of an endangered species , a major step forward in protections for wild animals. However, animal rights activists claim the legislation doesn’t go far enough, because it fails to address other threats. Captive breeding, public performances, and consumption in non-food products (i.e. traditional Chinese medicine, or TCM) are still allowed under the new law, and conservationists argue that these uses are what motivates the largest portion of endangered species poaching. China’s new law specifically bans the sale of food products made from endangered species recognized by the state government. Writing for The Shanghaiist , Robin Winship said that “simply restricting the sale of endangered animals as food, while nice and all, does not nearly suffice” when it comes to protecting those animals. In this way, China’s wildlife policies are not unlike its environmental protection efforts, which are criticized widely for being too soft to resolve very real problems. Related: Increased demand for lion bones threatens the species more than ever Because the law doesn’t address breeding and medicinal uses of endangered animal parts , many animals will continue to be bred and killed for use in TCM . For instance, stomach bile from bears is used in elixirs, despite a total absence of scientific evidence of any human benefit. In order to collect the bile, bears are bred in captivity, forced to live in cramped cages, and the animals often die from botched surgical attempts to extract their bile. Meanwhile, rhinoceros horns are also highly sought after, to be ground to a powder and used to treat a variety of ailments, again without any evidence that the treatment works. Many other animals are carved up for so-called medicinal purposes, with plenty of other endangered species bred as exotic pets or to be killed for some other senseless reason, like fashion. There are a lot of unanswered questions about how the new law will be enforced, considering the difficulties (or perhaps impossibilities) of identifying whether an animal is being sold as a food ingredient or for medical purposes, or whether an animal was wild-caught or captive bred. Without implementing clear procedures for permits or licensing for legal uses, China’s government may have just passed a law it can’t possibly enforce. Via Good Images via Wikipedia ( 1 , 2 )

Read the original here: 
China makes it illegal to eat endangered species

ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

July 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMJCd04ehKc ? Created as part of the National Building Museum’s Summer Block Party series, the 12,540-square-foot ICEBERGS project comprises over 30 geometric, iceberg-shaped elements in a variety of sizes ranging from 16 feet to 56 feet in height. Some of the triangular pentahedron and octahedron “icebergs” are suspended in the air, while others appear to float. The jagged landscape was constructed from prefabricated units made from reusable scaffolding and translucent polycarbonate paneling . White slides punctuate some icebergs as a playful interactive feature. ? “ICEBERGS invokes the surreal underwater-world of glacial ice fields,” said James Corner, founder and director of James Corner Field Operations. “Such a world is both beautiful and ominous given our current epoch of climate change , ice-melt, and rising seas. The installation creates an ambient field of texture, movement, and interaction, as in an unfolding landscape of multiples, distinct from a static, single object.” Related: Gigantic swimmable ball pit takes over D.C.’s National Building Museum ? Visitors can experience ICEBERGS from the Great Hall floor that’s punctuated with triangular beanbags, caverns, and grottoes, or from a higher level where they can look down at the “water line” suspended 20 feet in the air. The tallest “iceberg” rises to the height of 56 feet and includes a viewing area. To complement the installation, the Daikaya restaurant provides Japanese ‘kakigori’ shaved ice treats. The installation opened July 2, 2016 and will run until September 5, 2016. + James Corner Field Operations + National Building Museum Images by Timothy Schenck

Read the original post:
ICEBERGS immerse visitors in a beautiful underwater world in Washington, D.C.

Bad Behavior has blocked 5798 access attempts in the last 7 days.