How startup Coral Vita is making a business case for restoring reefs

March 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How startup Coral Vita is making a business case for restoring reefs

Its business model includes a role for local farmers, ecotourist operators and developers.

Read more here:
How startup Coral Vita is making a business case for restoring reefs

Herzog & de Meuron designs a Horizontal Skyscraper for Moscow

March 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Herzog & de Meuron designs a Horizontal Skyscraper for Moscow

Building on an urban waterfront often means compromised views for existing structures, but that’s not the case for the “Horizontal Skyscraper” in Moscow . As part of an urban revitalization plan for an abandoned historic brewery, Herzog & de Meuron unveiled designs for two new residential blocks that will be elevated 115 feet into the air and supported by slender white stilts. By raising the contemporary additions, the Swiss architects guarantee coveted panoramic views for residents and a preserved visual connection between the historic buildings and the Moscow River. Founded in 1875, the brick-clad Badaevskiy Brewery buildings that fell in disrepair after in the 2000s will be restored and renovated for new retail and community ventures such as a food market, clothing shops, a co-working space, gym, and childcare facilities. Herzog & de Meuron will lead the six-hectare heritage building restoration effort in addition to the new “Horizontal Skyscraper” envisioned as “a piece of city lifted up in the air.” Related: Herzog & de Meuron are upcycling a historic gasometer into a stunning residential tower The glazed and raised residences will comprise approximately 1.1 million square feet of apartments with glazed facades and private balconies. Eight “sky villas” on the upper level will also have private roof access. The architects have also planned for a new pedestrian-only public park that sits beneath the apartments and around the supporting stilts that the designers likened to “trunks of trees.” + Herzog & de Meuron Via ArchDaily Images via Herzog & de Meuron

Original post:
Herzog & de Meuron designs a Horizontal Skyscraper for Moscow

5 ways to unlock restoration finance

January 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 ways to unlock restoration finance

Seeding one of the most overlooked opportunities for economic growth.

Excerpt from:
5 ways to unlock restoration finance

These standards will help consumers develop circular know-how

January 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on These standards will help consumers develop circular know-how

To advance the circular economy, It’s important for end users to hone their own circular awareness and skills. Here’s how to start.

Here is the original:
These standards will help consumers develop circular know-how

Can pollution-sniffing sensors drive climate action?

January 31, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Can pollution-sniffing sensors drive climate action?

AirAware’s co-founders seek to raise public awareness and drive higher levels of community accountability.

Original post:
Can pollution-sniffing sensors drive climate action?

Ecological restoration goes to Washington

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ecological restoration goes to Washington

Restoration recovers natural areas to healthy condition and function. It’s also a good business opportunity that needs government backing.

Here is the original:
Ecological restoration goes to Washington

Green jobs are still (mostly) promising

January 16, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Green jobs are still (mostly) promising

Industry experts remain hopeful and excited about the green jobs market — yes, despite what you hear from Washington.

Read more here:
Green jobs are still (mostly) promising

Coal barge in London converted into a sophisticated floating home

September 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Coal barge in London converted into a sophisticated floating home

A 1924 barge in London has been transformed into an amazing floating home . The historic Humber Keel cargo boat now functions as a comfortable two-bedroom home with two baths, open living space and terrace views. The restored houseboat maintains the original woodwork and custom midcentury furnishings. The barge, originally used for transporting steel and coal and working in shallow waters, sits in the Poplar Dock Marina of London . It offers 812 square feet of living space which includes two bedrooms, a large open-plan reception/dining area, modern galley kitchen, and a desk area. Related: Solar-Powered Bauhaus Barge Offers Luxurious Living with a Low Carbon Footprint Much of the original woodwork has been retained throughout the house, including the original Goodin wood burner in the living room. Some of the additions to the interior include a dipped terra cotta pendant light by Hand and Eye Studio London, a Saikai Kaico Japanese enamel kettle, hand-thrown dishes by David Green Ceramics, and the 1960s Greaves and Thomas Egg chair. The house is currently for sale through The Modern House. + The Modern House Via Dwell

View original here: 
Coal barge in London converted into a sophisticated floating home

Salvaged materials from devastating fire take new life in a British pier

July 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Salvaged materials from devastating fire take new life in a British pier

A British seaside pier destroyed by a devastating fire in 2010 has made an incredible comeback in the hands of dRMM Architects . After a seven-year process, the century-old pier in Hastings, England was transformed from its decrepit and dangerous state to a vibrant new public space clad in reclaimed materials. Crafted in collaboration with the community, the Hastings Pier is an inspiring story of sustainable restoration and craft, earning it a place on the shortlist for the 2017 RIBA Stirling Prize , UK’s top architecture award. Originally constructed in 1872 and later topped with a pavilion that survived until the fire, the Hastings Pier enjoyed its heyday as an entertainment destination in the 1930s but later fell into disrepair and ultimately closed in recent decades due to neglect. Rather than restore the Victorian pier to its original design, drMM wanted to craft a pier better suited to the 21st century and focused on designing an attractive multipurpose space with few buildings. The architects not only redesigned the pier, but also wrote the brief and helped raise funds with the Heritage Lottery Fund that paid for structural repairs below deck and partially covered the costs of rebuilding the pier above deck. The most defining building on the new pier is the new visitor center , that’s not positioned at the end of the pier but rather on top of the damaged pier’s weakest section. The cross-laminated timber structure is clad in reclaimed timber salvaged from the fire and is topped with an accessible viewpoint rooftop that doubles as an events space. The only other structures are a pair of circular extensions that house a kitchen, staff facility, and toilet; a group of hut-like trading stalls; and deck furniture built from reclaimed materials as part of a local employment initiative. The 266-meter-long deck was rebuilt with sustainably sourced African Ekki hardwood. Related: Light-filled cancer center harnesses the healing power of nature RIBA wrote: “From a conservation perspective, this project has reinvigorated a fire-damaged historic structure and facilitated a contemporary and appropriate new 21st century use. The project has been mindful to integrate material from the original pier in the new design, and the process of restoration was used to help train a new generation of craft specialists.” + dRMM Via Dezeen Images © Alex de Rijke

Read the original here: 
Salvaged materials from devastating fire take new life in a British pier

SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

June 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)’s award-winning tradition of historic preservation hit another home run for Preservation Month. SCAD students salvaged a piece of American history that would have otherwise disappeared when they restored of a rare 1911 wooden passenger train car. The students turned the railroad preservation project into an educational opportunity and intentionally left parts of the train car in its found state to teach visitors about the preservation process. Owned by the nonprofit Coastal Heritage Society , the decrepit rare train car was originally brought to the Georgia State Railroad Museum from the city of Augusta. As part of a spring student project, three graduate and eight undergraduate SCAD students carefully restored the 1911 train car to complement the SCAD Museum of Art, an adaptive reuse project that turned an 1853 antebellum railroad depot into a modern museum. The train car is currently displayed alongside the museum. Related: SCAD Students Transform an Atlanta Parking Garage into Ecologically Responsible Micro-Housing Community “SCAD knows well the stories of Georgia’s railways—our award-winning SCAD Museum of Art rises proudly from the ruins of the nation’s oldest surviving antebellum railroad depot,” said SCAD President and Founder, Paula Wallace. “Now, the nation’s premier preservation design program helps narrate another tale for the appreciation of railfans for generations to come.” Students’ preservation work included replacing the train car’s exterior wood siding, refinishing woodwork, and stripping the original mahogany panels of layers of paint and shellac. + Savannah College of Art and Design Images by Dylan Wilson

Read the original post: 
SCAD students save a piece of American history with vintage train car restoration

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8937 access attempts in the last 7 days.