How are millennials preferences changing the food industry?

June 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on How are millennials preferences changing the food industry?

Millennials are dramatically disrupting the way food is produced, packaged, marketed and served. As a highly vocal group, millennials have given food producers little option but to listen to their demands, resulting in changes to not only food choices, but farming techniques and restaurant services as well. These changes have reverberated throughout the food industry, creating a food landscape vastly different from the one experienced by millennials’ parents. Healthy Has a New Look Millennials have altered what it means for food to be healthy. While older generations may have contented themselves with vague “low-fat” or “healthy” labels, millennials have higher expectations, especially when it comes to GMOs. While it’s estimated that 70 percent of processed foods contain GMOs, more than  60 percent of millennials want non-GMO food options, and 68 percent pay more for organic products. It’s likely that demand for these products will only increase, and the food industry is becoming more transparent in order to meet this demand. Localized Food Production Increases Millennials don’t just want to avoid GMOs; they want to know exactly which ingredients are included and where those ingredients come from. This desire for increased transparency has led to a preference for local food brands over national ones, both at the level of production and consumption. Whether buying food at the grocery store or eating out, millennials seek out locally sourced food. Some millennials have taken this trend a step further and started to grow their own food in urban and rooftop farms. Take, for example, the farm on top of the Method Products manufacturing plant in Chicago . One of the world’s largest, this rooftop farm can produce up to 10 million crops each year. And it doesn’t stop there—all the vegetables and herbs on the farm are pesticide-free and grown sustainably. Using rooftops in place of traditional farms helps make better use of available land and provides urban dwellers with access to the locally grown produce that millennials seek out on a regular basis. Eating out Is More Popular Another major change to the food industry includes the increased popularity of eating out. In 1970, only 25.9 percent of consumers ate out , as opposed to 43.5 percent today. Though millennials don’t account for the entirety of this increase, they have contributed significantly to it. According to a recent USDA report , millennials consumed 2.3 percent of their meals in restaurants, which equates to eating out about twice a month. Technology also plays a major role in making restaurants more popular with younger generations. With apps like the Humane Eating project that combine millennials’ love of technology with sustainable eating, it’s no wonder that more people are exploring new places to eat. And apps aren’t the only thing that appeals to millennials—restaurants with guest WiFi and tablet point-of-sale systems tend to draw in younger crowds as well, which suggests these methods may become standard restaurant practice within the next decade. Despite their youth, millennials have already had a strong influence on the food industry. From its focus on healthy eating to its interest in locally sourced and sustainably grown food, this group is poised to turn food production and service around, which could have positive consequences for a world fighting obesity and other health concerns. However, only time will tell if the impact millennials have on the food industry will have long-lasting effects on other facets of life, from the economy to government policy and public health. + Food Industry Executive + Forbes + Organic Trade Association + QSR Magazine + USDA Images via Pexels (1) (2) , Pxhere , and Pixabay

Original post: 
How are millennials preferences changing the food industry?

‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

January 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on ‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

Hungry jet skiers or boaters could soon be able to cruise up to a floating kitchen in Dubai and order food. Aquatic Architects Design Studio (AADS) came up with Aqua Pod , dubbed the world’s first floating kitchen – and Gulf News said it will be coming to the city later this month. Aqua Pod takes the idea of a food truck to the water. The floating structure will make it easy for those in marine crafts to grab a snack. AADS founder Ahmad Yousuf told Gulf News there are two potential ordering systems: in one, a delivery jet ski from the Aqua Pod passes out flags to boats or yachts , and boaters raise their flag to make an order. The delivery jet ski will take orders and deliver food. In the second scheme, people can jet right up to Aqua Pod to place an order – although that system would only work for smaller crafts. Related: Floating Solar Orchid Pods Could Bring Pop-Up Restaurants to Singapore’s Waterfront What food will Aqua Pod offer? Burgers, to start. Yousuf said their client went with burgers because it’s an easy meal to eat, although they might expand the menu to include pizza or desserts depending on how successful the concept is. Electricity will power the floating kitchen. But won’t it leave a lot of litter in its wake? Yousuf told Gulf News the pod “has a built-in system that allows it to collect any trash in the sea. So even if someone makes an order from us and then throws that trash into the sea – which is out of our control – the Aqua Pod can take in all that waste into one of its tanks, which is then discharged afterwards.” The Aqua Pod can easily move around, floating to where the demand is. Yousuf told Gulf News it will start operating in Jumeirah, and reach areas like “Al Sufouh Beach, Kite Beach, and the Palm Lagoon one and two.” + Aquatic Architects Design Studio Via Gulf News Images via Aquatic Architects Design Studio and Christoph Schulz on Unsplash

View post:
‘World’s first floating kitchen’ is a food truck for the seas

Sustainable food certification gets ‘REAL’

December 6, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable food certification gets ‘REAL’

The United States Healthful Food Council has taken a cue from LEED to audit restaurant meals.

Excerpt from:
Sustainable food certification gets ‘REAL’

3 ways businesses can target consumer food waste

February 14, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 3 ways businesses can target consumer food waste

We've looked at why your firm should reduce food wasted by customers. Now here's how to do it.

More:
3 ways businesses can target consumer food waste

McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwiches To Carry ‘Sustainable’ Labeling in US Restaurants

January 25, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwiches To Carry ‘Sustainable’ Labeling in US Restaurants

McDonald’s has announced that it will be the first national restaurant chain in the US to carry products bearing the blue label certificate awarded to seafood products that meet the Marine Stewardship Council standards on sustainable fishing . Starting next month, McDonald’s will pay annual fees and royalties to the Marine Stewardship Council’s ecolabel for their Filet-O-Fish sandwiches. However, it’s really rather questionable as to whether anything from McDonald’s can truly claim to be sustainable. Read the rest of McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwiches To Carry ‘Sustainable’ Labeling in US Restaurants Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: endangered fish , fish ecolabel , Marine Stewardship Council , McDonald’s Alaskan Pollock , McDonald’s overfishing , McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish , McDonald’s Fish , New Zealand Hoki , red-rated fish , sustainable fisheries , sustainable fishing , sustainable food

See the original post:
McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwiches To Carry ‘Sustainable’ Labeling in US Restaurants

Peugeot Announces Plans to Release a Hybrid Car That Runs on Compressed Air by 2016

January 25, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Peugeot Announces Plans to Release a Hybrid Car That Runs on Compressed Air by 2016

Peugeot just announced plans to introduce a new hybrid car that does away with lithium-ion batteries entirely and instead uses compressed air to provide zero-emissions driving. The new compressed air car that will be powered by a hybrid system that combines a gas motor with compressed air storage. Read the rest of Peugeot Announces Plans to Release a Hybrid Car That Runs on Compressed Air by 2016 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: citroen , citroen hybrid car , compressed gas , green car , green transportation , hybrid car , Peugeot , peugeot hybrid car , zero-emissions driving

More: 
Peugeot Announces Plans to Release a Hybrid Car That Runs on Compressed Air by 2016

Culinary Misfits Rescue Fruits & Veggies that Supermarkets and Restaurants Reject

November 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Culinary Misfits Rescue Fruits & Veggies that Supermarkets and Restaurants Reject

Beauty is only skin deep – but try telling that to supermarkets who reject an apple or carrot with even the slightest hint of a blemish. Fortunately, there are those among us who are willing to look past perfection and accept the produce that grocery stores reject. The Culinary  Misfits are a catering team out of Germany that uses only the fruits and vegetables that don’t meet the standards of stores and restaurants.  Still perfectly edible and delicious, the misshapen or discolored food is saved from becoming animal feed or tossed in the trash. Read the rest of Culinary Misfits Rescue Fruits & Veggies that Supermarkets and Restaurants Reject Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: crowdfund , culinary misfits , germany , kreuzberg , lea emma brumsack , Produce , product design , tanja krakowski

See original here: 
Culinary Misfits Rescue Fruits & Veggies that Supermarkets and Restaurants Reject

Andy Avalar Makes Unique Business Card Holders From Electronic Components

November 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Andy Avalar Makes Unique Business Card Holders From Electronic Components

After spending years in the computer repair business, mixed media artist Andy Avalar found a good use for all of the old computer and electronic components he collected by transforming them into unique business card holders. Each is a one-of-a-kind, upcycled piece of functional art. Designed to hold business cards horizontally or vertically, the pieces make a statement about your cards, and keep discarded electronics out of the landfill. + Andy Avalar The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Andy Avalar , business card holder , business cards , Recycled computer parts , Recycled Materials , upcycled computer parts

More here:
Andy Avalar Makes Unique Business Card Holders From Electronic Components

Are building owners leaving money on the energy efficiency table?

August 8, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Are building owners leaving money on the energy efficiency table?

Due to risks associated with upgrade projects or the age of the building itself, cost savings aren't always maximized. Learn how to shift your risk while offering incentives to others.

Read the original:
Are building owners leaving money on the energy efficiency table?

How a polluted winery became a model of sustainable practices

July 17, 2012 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How a polluted winery became a model of sustainable practices

The oldest winery in the US was transformed over the course of eight years by rethinking its relationship with water, aerating its wastewater and using renewables.

View original post here:
How a polluted winery became a model of sustainable practices

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 914 access attempts in the last 7 days.