Sustainable Konbit shelter replaces home destroyed by Haiti earthquake

August 4, 2017 by  
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Many Haitians are still trying to rebuild their lives seven years after a powerful earthquake devastated much of the country . Thankfully, organizations like Konbit Shelters are helping local communities build sustainable homes that are designed to be resilient against future natural disasters. The Konbit team has just finished work on House Louisana, a multi-family home built by locals with a variety of locally-sourced, sustainable materials . Located in the community of Cormiers, House Louisana was built in collaboration with the local community, along with Oficina Design and the Heliotrope Foundation . The home was built for Mama Louisana and her extended family, who lost everything in the deadly 2012 earthquake. The family has been living in a temporary shelter every since. Related: Konbit Super-Adobe Shelters are Helping a Rural Haitian Village Rebuild In order to rebuild a space secure enough for her and her extended family, the design team chose to go with locally-sourced materials with strong, resilient qualities. Local guadua bamboo was the main building material, and was used in the structure’s supports and roof. Earth and natural fibers were used to create the walls, implementing the local practice of “bahareque” or constructing with natural mud or earth . The design aesthetic was cultivated in accordance with the local Haitian vernacular, including a double-pitched roof, open-air front porch, and plenty of outdoor space surrounding the home for socializing. On the interior, a central patio is surrounded by the living room, bedrooms and a kitchen. Since there is no electricity, windows and open cutouts were placed around the home for optimal natural light and air circulation. The high, inverted ceiling also aids in air circulation. On the exterior, the roof’s eaves jut out over the home considerably in order to distribute rain away from the main living area and porch during tropical rain storms. The low-tech, but efficient features used in the project were taught to the crew of local builders who helped with the project so they can be implemented in future sustainable constructions in the area. The home was built in just four months and was funded by a Kickstarter campaign. + Konbit Shelters + Oficina Design Images via Oficina Design

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Sustainable Konbit shelter replaces home destroyed by Haiti earthquake

Beautiful bamboo building withstands floods and storms in Vietnam

July 13, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm RÂU ARCH created this beautiful thatched roof building burrowed deep into the lush rainforests of Vietnam. The MOOC Spring building is designed to accommodate the many visitors that come to the nearby natural springs. Due to the reoccurring storms and floods in the area, the architects chose to use a combination of locally-sourced stone, timber and bamboo , along with traditional building techniques in order to create a resilient structure able to withstand the harsh climate. The building was designed as an addition for an adjacent resort and houses a restaurant and lounge area. In addition to using locally-sourced materials in its construction, the Mooc Spring building was also built using traditional methods. The circular shape was chosen to withstand harsh winds and the building sits on a base made out of local stone. The first floor contains utility rooms as well as the kitchen and bathrooms. Related: Luxurious bamboo beach bar and restaurant bolsters spa in Vietnam The upper level, which houses the reception area and restaurant, was constructed using timber and bamboo . Although concrete pillars were used for optimal strength, they were wrapped with honey-hued nulgar bamboo for added resilience and of course, for its beautiful aesthetic. The local material was woven throughout the building in various intricate patterns and details to create an atmosphere that would blend in with the natural surroundings. The interior space is exceptionally well-lit thanks to the large glass skylight in the thatched roof that floods the interior with natural light . + RÂU ARCH Via Archdaily Photography by Hùng Râu Kts

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Tile shelter protects ancient inscriptions on China’s Thousand-Buddha Cliff

May 10, 2017 by  
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The Qianfoya Cliff Inscriptions in Guangyuan, Sichuan Province date back about 1700 years – but unfortunately, they’ve been damaged over the years by high winds and rain. To protect the beloved historic site from further erosion, the National Administration of Cultural Heritage recently constructed a protective shelter with a breathable tile-curtain facade directly onto the cliffside. Although the objective of the shelter was to protect the ancient inscriptions, the museum sought a practical solution that would offer optimal resilience without taking away from the natural beauty surrounding the caves. The small black shelter is designed to blend into the rocky cliffs. Related: New protective timber slats shield the renovated Escu House from Sydney’s sun To blend the hut into the cliff with minimal interference, a horizontal platform was rooted into the landscape through a cantilever system supported by deep manual piles. Traditional grey tiles cover the walls and the roof, blending into the cliff and the natural environment. Over time, moss will begin to cover the structure, further integrating the building into its setting. The shelter protects the inscriptions from rain and strong winds with a semi-transparent fabric. The breathable envelope provides shade to reduce the exposure to direct sunlight and maintains the cliff’s natural temperature and humidity. Openings on the west facade of the structure enable full air ventilation throughout the interior, which helps to reduce moisture and humidity that could have occurred with a more conventional shelter design. A multimedia box inside gives visitors an overview of the historic nature of the cliff inscriptions. + Art Museum of Qianfoya Cliff Inscriptions

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4.4 billion years ago Earth had no mountains and was covered with water, say scientists

May 10, 2017 by  
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Tiny zircon crystals have allowed scientists at Australian National University (ANU) to paint a portrait of what Earth looked like over four billion years ago. Their scrutiny of the mineral grains – the oldest fragments of the planet we’ve ever uncovered – led them to think our world was a much different place back then. They say the planet, which was barren, had no mountains, and probably only a few islands poked up above the water blanketing the rest of the planet. Zircon crystals preserved inside sandstone rocks in the Jack Hills of Western Australia provided clues to our planet’s history – billions of years before humans ever showed up. Lead researcher Antony Burnham said the zircon samples were collected over multiple decades, and his team also drew on chemical analyses from an ANU research group two decades ago. He likened zircon grains to skin cells at a crime scene. Related: World’s largest dinosaur footprint found in Australia’s “Jurassic Park” “The history of the Earth is like a book with its first chapter ripped out with no surviving rocks from the very early period, but we’ve used these trace elements of zircon to build a profile of the world at that time,” he said in a statement. “Our research indicates there were no mountains and continental collisions during the Earth’s first 700 million years or more of existence – it was a much more quiet and dull place.” The zircon formed from melting older igneous rocks, instead of sediment melting, which is typical in continental collisions. And it appears it took a long time for the planet to change from the flat landscape into the Earth we inhabit now. “Our findings also showed that there are strong similarities with zircon from the types of rocks that predominated for the following 1.5 billion years, suggesting that it took the Earth a long time to evolve into the planet that we know today,” Burnham said. The journal Nature Geoscience published the research online yesterday. Via Australian National University Images via Stuart Hay, ANU

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4.4 billion years ago Earth had no mountains and was covered with water, say scientists

One of the world’s greenest buildings 14 feet above sea level prepares for climate change

April 4, 2016 by  
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INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’

March 27, 2016 by  
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When Inhabitat design writer ,  Bridgette Meinhold , heard about the earthquake in Haiti in 2010 and the massive devastation it caused, she wanted to help, and was drawn to start investigating different options for temporary shelters and disaster relief housing. This exploration gradually broadened to a larger focus on design for disaster-preparedness ; seeking out what type of shelters can best withstand earthquakes, hurricanes, rising sea levels and tornados. Now I’m thrilled to say that after years of research, Bridgette has just published an incredible new book entitled Urgent Architecture: 40 Sustainable Housing Solutions for a Changing World . Urgent Architecture showcases inspiring and innovative ideas for resilient design – design that will withstand the test of time – surviving climate change, rising sea levels, manmade and natural disasters . I recently had a chance to interview Bridgette about her new book at Inhabitat HQ in NYC , and she gave me some fascinating insight into her inspiration for the book, the impact  climate change  will have on future housing and what she believes is necessary to create a more sustainable and responsive built landscape. Watch the video above for the interview, and if you want to learn more, you can get your own copy of Urgent Architecture here . A full transcript of the interview with pics is available after the jump. Read the rest of INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’

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INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’

August 25, 2015 by  
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When Inhabitat design writer ,  Bridgette Meinhold , heard about the earthquake in Haiti in 2010 and the massive devastation it caused, she wanted to help, and was drawn to start investigating different options for temporary shelters and disaster relief housing. This exploration gradually broadened to a larger focus on design for disaster-preparedness ; seeking out what type of shelters can best withstand earthquakes, hurricanes, rising sea levels and tornados. Now I’m thrilled to say that after years of research, Bridgette has just published an incredible new book entitled Urgent Architecture: 40 Sustainable Housing Solutions for a Changing World . Urgent Architecture showcases inspiring and innovative ideas for resilient design – design that will withstand the test of time – surviving climate change, rising sea levels, manmade and natural disasters . I recently had a chance to interview Bridgette about her new book at Inhabitat HQ in NYC , and she gave me some fascinating insight into her inspiration for the book, the impact  climate change  will have on future housing and what she believes is necessary to create a more sustainable and responsive built landscape. Watch the video above for the interview, and if you want to learn more, you can get your own copy of Urgent Architecture here . A full transcript of the interview with pics is available after the jump. Read the rest of INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’

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Foster + Partners and Nissan are developing the electric vehicle charging station of the future

August 25, 2015 by  
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Foster + Partners , just announced an exciting new project with car manufacturer  Nissan . The two companies will partner to develop and design what they are calling the Fuel Station of the Future. Nissan has been established as a leader in the electric vehicle field, and Foster + Partners is world-renowned for its bold and innovative designs. Together, the two brands will rethink the concept of a fuel station in a world with an ever-increasing number vehicles that run on electricity instead of gasoline. Read the rest of Foster + Partners and Nissan are developing the electric vehicle charging station of the future

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INFOGRAPHIC: 5 water purification solutions for developing countries

August 25, 2015 by  
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Did you know that improving water sanitation levels could prevent 10 percent of the global disease burden? Billions of people around the world lack access to clean water and are at risk for many water-related diseases. Fortunately, effective and low-cost water purification technologies are finally catching up, and can be easily implemented in developing countries. UF Online put together an infographic that explores five such solutions, from how each design works to the advantages and disadvantages. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: 5 water purification solutions for developing countries

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INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’

June 28, 2013 by  
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When Inhabitat’s Architecture Editor ,  Bridgette Meinhold , heard about the earthquake in Haiti in 2010 and the massive devastation it caused, she wanted to help, and was drawn to start investigating different options for temporary shelters and disaster relief housing. This exploration gradually broadened to a larger focus on design for disaster-preparedness ; seeking out what type of shelters can best withstand earthquakes, hurricanes, rising sea levels and tornados. Now I’m thrilled to say that after years of research, Bridgette has just published an incredible new book entitled Urgent Architecture: 40 Sustainable Housing Solutions for a Changing World . Urgent Architecture showcases inspiring and innovative ideas for resilient design – design that will withstand the test of time – surviving climate change, rising sea levels, manmade and natural disasters . I recently had a chance to interview Bridgette about her new book at Inhabitat HQ in NYC , and she gave me some fascinating insight into her inspiration for the book, the impact  climate change  will have on future housing and what she believes is necessary to create a more sustainable and responsive built landscape. Watch the video above for the interview, and if you want to learn more, you can get your own copy of Urgent Architecture here . A full transcript of the interview with pics is available after the jump. Read the rest of INTERVIEW: With Bridgette Meinhold, Author of ‘Urgent Architecture’ Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , adaptable housing , book review , bridgette meinhold , bridgette meinhold interview , design for disaster preparedness , design to withstand disasters , disaster design , disaster housing , Eco Architecture , eco design , green architecture , green books , green design , inhabitat book review , Prefab Housing , resilient architecture , resilient design , sustainable design , urgent architecture        

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