Episode 81: Laying Hawaii’s roadmap for renewable electricity by 2045

June 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

In this week’s episode, the GreenBiz team reports on the ground from the VERGE Hawaii 2017 conference.

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Episode 81: Laying Hawaii’s roadmap for renewable electricity by 2045

How Canada’s dairy capital became a ‘change agent’ for renewables

June 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

A small agricultural city is jumping at the chance to lead the way on sustainability.

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How Canada’s dairy capital became a ‘change agent’ for renewables

REBA, a Google SVP and a physicist find the equation for change

June 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Google’s Urs Holzle, the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance and John Goodenough have the imagination and capacity to make the impossible possible for renewable energy.

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REBA, a Google SVP and a physicist find the equation for change

REBA, a Google SVP and a physicist find the equation for change

June 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Google’s Urs Holzle, the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance and John Goodenough have the imagination and capacity to make the impossible possible for renewable energy.

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REBA, a Google SVP and a physicist find the equation for change

How midsize cloud player Akamai buys clean power

June 21, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Direct access to renewable electricity no longer is limited to corporate giants. Smaller operators are starting to buy solar and wind using innovative procurement strategies.

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How midsize cloud player Akamai buys clean power

U.S. just generated 10% of electricity from solar and wind for the first time

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Would anyone still like to claim renewable energy can’t power our world? It may take a while, but America is getting more and more of its energy from renewables, according to data from the United States Energy Information Administration (EIA). In March 2017, the country generated 10 percent of total electricity from solar power and wind power . This week the EIA reported more than 10 percent of the country’s total electricity generation came from wind and solar. In 2016, those two renewable sources made up seven percent of America’s electricity generation. Increased generating capacity enabled the U.S. to get more clean power . The figures include utility plants and small-scale systems. Related: The sweet moment California got a record 50% of its electricity from solar The EIA noted seasons impact how much clean energy will be generated from renewables. Wind electricity generation usually reaches its height in the spring in places like Texas and Oklahoma , but in California it usually peaks in the summer. Solar output is unsurprisingly best in the summer due to longer daylight hours. The EIA predicted the country would again generate over 10 percent of power from renewables again in April based on weather patterns from other years, but the numbers would dwindle to under 10 percent during the summer. Solar and wind combined tend to generate more power during either the spring or the fall, the administration said. Data from 2016 shows wind generated more power than solar in nearly all of the states, according to the EIA. Looking at the top 12 states, only California and Arizona obtained more power from solar than wind. The prize for most wind energy generated goes to Texas. And energy received from renewable sources was highest in Iowa , which generated 37 percent of power from renewables. Six other states got around 20 percent of power from wind and solar. Via the United States Energy Information Administration Images via U.S. Department of Energy on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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U.S. just generated 10% of electricity from solar and wind for the first time

Incredibly rare two-headed porpoise found in the North Sea

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

An unsuspecting fisherman recently stumbled across an incredibly rare two-headed dolphin. Only nine examples of conjoined twins have ever been found among cetaceans , according to Erwin Kompanje, curator of mammals for the Natural History Museum Rotterdam in the Netherlands . So he jumped at the chance to study a rare specimen of conjoined harbor porpoises caught the end of May by Dutch fisherman. But when he reached out to the fisherman, what happened next was a scientist’s nightmare. It’s not unheard of for trawlers to accidentally catch a porpoise. There are hundreds of thousands of the cetaceans near the coast of the Netherlands. But no one has ever caught conjoined twin harbor porpoises. The fisherman snapped photos, which made their way to Kompanje. He couldn’t wait to study the creature in the laboratory. Related: Fish with “human-like teeth” spotted in Michigan lakes Kompanje could tell the twins were male, and had likely recently been born – and he thinks they were born alive. They probably didn’t live for long; either they had two brains which might have told them to swim in different directions, or a single heart may have failed to pump enough blood to keep them alive. Conjoined twins are an extremely rare find. And these looked to be in good condition. Others that have been discovered were undeveloped fetuses – such as one found near Japan in 1970 in a dolphin’s womb – or have started to decompose, such as a dolphin with two beaks found in 2001. Kompanje reached out to the fisherman to try and obtain the specimen for study. But this story doesn’t have a happy ending for science. The fisherman thought it was illegal to catch the conjoined twins, so after the photographs, they tossed the creature back into the sea. Kompanje told The Washington Post, “For a cetologist, this is a real horror.” Based on the photographs he was still able to publish a paper in DEINSEA, the online journal of the natural history museum, joined by one scientist of the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research and one from Wageningen Marine Research . Sadly, we may never know more about the rare twins. Via The Washington Post Images via Kompanje, E.J.O.; Camphuysen, C.J.; and Leopold, M.F.

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Incredibly rare two-headed porpoise found in the North Sea

Global coal production falls 6.2% in the biggest decline in history

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

U.S. President Donald Trump may believe coal is the future , but newly-released statistics by BP Statistical Review of Energy state otherwise. According to the data, global coal production fell by an astonishing 6.2 percent last year — the largest annual decline on record. Additionally, consumption decreased for the second year in a row, dropping 1.7 percent. In wake of these findings, it should come as no surprise that once again, renewables were the fastest growing energy source, growing by a whopping 12 percent — a statistic which represents the largest annual incremental increase in output on record. The report , entitled “Energy markets in transition: BP Statistical Review shows long-term shifts underway,” concluded that the oil market is declining because fast-growing markets are shifting “towards lower carbon fuels as renewable energy continues to grow strongly and coal use falls.” The report also showed that the shift from coal is widespread. The UK, for instance, consumed 52.5 percent less in 2016, the U.S. experienced an 8.8 percent dip in consumption and China’s reliance dropped by 1.6 percent. Evidence to support these conclusions abound. For instance, the UK recently experienced its first coal-free day since the Industrial Revolution. India also intends to halt all coal plant production in the near future, as renewable technologies have become more affordable. Related: U.S. coal production dips to lowest point in 35 years due to rise of renewable energy sources Bob Dudley, BP Group Chief Executive, said, “Global energy markets are in transition. The longer-term trends we can see in this data are changing the patterns of demand and the mix of supply as the world works to meet the challenge of supplying the energy it needs while also reducing carbon emissions . At the same time markets are responding to shorter-run run factors, most notably the oversupply that has weighed on oil prices for the past three years.” As was previously mentioned, renewable energy was the fastest growing of all energy sources, increasing by 12 percent. Though solar, wind and other renewable energy sources provide only 4 percent of the world’s total energy, the increase represents almost one-third of the total growth in energy demand in 2016. Despite certain leaders’ opposition to renewable energy investments, it seems clear the future is green and that consumers will continue to invest in energy sources that are beneficial for the environment, wildlife, and future generations – and their bottom line. + BP Statistical Review of Energy Images via Pixabay

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Global coal production falls 6.2% in the biggest decline in history

Reconsidering the sustainability of hydropower

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

A new framework makes it more straightforward to evaluate projects against more than 20 social, environmental, technical and economic factors.

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Reconsidering the sustainability of hydropower

Weaving clean energy into low-income communities

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The challenges of including disadvantaged households and communities in the renewables movement haven’t largely gone unaddressed.

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Weaving clean energy into low-income communities

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