Ancient rural hamlet reinterpreted as a solar-powered modern home

July 13, 2018 by  
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Rimini-based GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects  has renovated a cluster of historic buildings into a modernist dwelling set in the lush Italian countryside. Named the AP House, the project comprises three structures with a more streamlined farmhouse aesthetic on the exterior and a light-filled contemporary interior. The striking renovation is located on one of the highest hills in Urbino atop ancient remains that date back to the Medieval Communes. Clad in rustic stonework, AP House consists of three floors constructed with reinforced concrete walls and red concrete floors. To lend the interiors a sense of warmth, GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects inserted custom walnut wall furnishings throughout, from the kitchen storage and dining table to the walnut-lined office and double-height statement wall that rises from the living room. Large openings let in plenty of natural light and views of the picturesque Urbino countryside. “Linked to each other on the hypogeum level, the structures rest on a red concrete platform (38 X 20 mt) dominating the surrounding landscape,” wrote GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects. “The core of the houses, which forms a single housing unit, reestablishes a central role to this site in the landscape, restoring a direct and empathic dialogue between new buildings and historical stratification.” Related: Historic stone stable in Tuscany hides a beautiful contemporary interior To prevent views of any vehicles on the first floor, the architects tucked the main entrance and parking in the basement level. The lower level also comprises a movie room, an exhibition gallery, and a gym with a spa. The ground floor houses the primary living areas including the living room, dining room, kitchen and private studio, while the upper level contains the master suite along with two en-suite bedrooms. All of the systems in the house run on electricity and are powered by a hidden photovoltaic solar system onsite. + GGA Gardini Gibertini Architects Images by Ezio Manciucca

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Ancient rural hamlet reinterpreted as a solar-powered modern home

The spacious Camberwell House reconnects a large family with nature

July 13, 2018 by  
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When a family approached AM Architecture wanting to turn their mid-century modern into a more spacious home with a stronger relationship to the outdoors, the firm had a tall order to fill. The large family wanted a bigger indoor living space to accommodate their numbers and an improved layout that would allow them to reconnect with nature. The result is the 5,920 square-foot Camberwell House in Melbourne . The firm redesigned the existing home and successfully created a comfortable space for the family that embraces indoor-outdoor living. To meet the family’s expectations, the architects created a split-level design for the living areas and re-centered the home’s entry to create a pavilion , which serves as a meeting place for the family and their guests. The pavilion structure has become a focal point of the house, incorporating key elements that serve as the centerpiece of any home: the kitchen, a dining space and living areas complete with a fireplace. To help foster a stronger connection to nature, the architects included large windows throughout the home. These windows, including the floor-to-ceiling glazing, utilize a low-E coating to help block heat in the summer and keep the house cozy and warm in the winter. Large internal brick walls also assist in regulating the indoor climate. Related: Mid-century Eichler home gets a bold remodel into the 21st century Furnishings are a futuristic take on mid-century style and blend well into the wood and glass materials that make up the family home. In the kitchen, cupboards provide plenty of storage space while also concealing appliances. An abundance of shelving proudly displays the residents’ knickknacks. In the living space, bare pendant lighting and a ceramic fireplace mimic the vertical placement of the home as well as nearby trees. The full-height windows fill the common areas with natural light . Thanks to their new location on a higher level in the home, bedrooms offer privacy and serenity for both kids and adults. From their beds, the family can look out to views of the backyard and nearby park. Although the home is two stories, the glass wall seamlessly integrates the two spaces. “This split level addition creates a dramatic new focal point in the house,” the architects said, “that connects all discrete parts of the house and introduces a dramatic relationship to its beautiful, natural surrounds.” + AM Architecture Images via Dianna Snape

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This modern solar-powered retreat is topped with a massive green roof

June 18, 2018 by  
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Outside the concrete jungle of São Paulo , Brazil is a solar-powered holiday retreat that fully embraces nature. Brazilian architecture firm Studio MK27 designed the striking home, called the Planar House, for a couple and their three children. Despite the rather spacious size of 10,763 square feet, the dwelling projects lightness thanks to its concrete slab green roof that appears to float above the landscape. Topped with a grassy green roof , the Planar House was crafted to blend in with the surrounding lawn and rolling hills. The building was constructed almost entirely of reinforced, poured in-situ concrete. Slender metallic pillars on both side of the home hold up the concrete slab roof. The home, which was designed for entertaining, consists of five en-suite bedrooms, the staff quarters, kitchen, kid’s playroom and expansive living and dining areas with indoor-outdoor access thanks to sliding glass doors. A hallway that runs north to south divides the programming. “Planar House is a radical exercise in horizontality, [an] aspect commonly explored in the projects of the studio,”  Studio MK27 explained. “Discreetly inserted in the highest point of the plot and favoring the existing topography, its presence is most strongly felt in the footprint rather than volumetrically. [The home is] an extensive line in an open landscape.” Related: Flat green roof helps Casa Guarujá integrate with the forest in Brazil The holiday home’s design was strongly influenced by Miesian architecture. The home is sandwiched between two concrete slabs with the upper slab serving as a structural platform. The interiors feature board-formed concrete ceilings and a mostly timber material palette that lends warmth throughout. In contrast to the home’s rigid geometry, the architects added a sinuous brick wall — punctuated by voids to let in light and views — that wraps around part of the home. The architects said, “The wall, which is usually a symbol of division and isolation, in this project, is at times concave and at others convex, embracing the entrance garden and creating transparencies as well as offering protection from the street.” + Studio MK27 Images by Fernando Guerra

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This modern solar-powered retreat is topped with a massive green roof

Striking green-roofed house cantilevers over a cliff in Japan

November 30, 2017 by  
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This striking concrete house extends from a cliff above a river in Japan , providing spectacular views of the surrounding landscape. The two-floor green-roofed structure, designed by architecture firm Planet Creations , establishes a delicate balance between rugged and warm materials, with raw wood contrasting against stark concrete walls. The villa is located in Tenkawa village, and it cantilevers over the Tenokawa River, 56 feet below. It’s built into flat bedrock, and the layout is split along the length of the structure. A bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom occupy one side, while the master bedroom, living room and deck area occupy the other. Related: Organic Japanese Shell Residence Wraps Around a Centenarian Fir Tree The steep slope dictated the design of the house and constrained the flatland space to only 64 square feet – enough to accommodate two cars and not much else. In order to ensure structural stability, the architect decided to “submerge the building near the rock so as to melt into this surrounding environment.” + Planet Creations Via Ignant Photos by Masato Sekiya

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Striking green-roofed house cantilevers over a cliff in Japan

Newly discovered property of graphene could lead to infinite clean energy

November 30, 2017 by  
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Physicists at the University of Arkansas have discovered a new property of graphene that could be exploited to generate endless, clean energy . While investigating the simple phenomenon of graphene’s ability to ripple and shake, physicist Paul Thibado and a group of graduate students uncovered a previously unknown behavior in which the wonder material buckles and twists in small, random fluctuations, potentially allowing graphene to be used as an ambient power source. When two electrodes are added on either side of a subtly shaking sheet of graphene, a small shifting voltage is produced, one that can could be magnified for practical use through layering. This new discovery was made over the course of a fairly mundane exploration of graphene’s known tendency to jiggle. It is this random movement of atoms that allows the nearly 2D graphene to function as a 3D material. To study this behavior, students laid sheets of graphene on a copper grid and observed the atomic movement through a scanning tunneling microscope . “The students felt we weren’t going to learn anything useful,” said Thibado , “but I wondered if we were asking too simple a question.” The students then searched for a pattern in graphene’s movement. “Looking at large-scale averages hid the different patterns. Each region of a single image, when viewed over time, produced a more meaningful pattern,” said Thibado. Related: New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater This meaningful pattern of small, random fluctuations that result in dramatic shifts is known as a Lévy flight. Although the phenomenon had been previously observed in biology and climate studies , this marks the first instance in which it was observed on an atomic level. These movements allowed for the production of a small voltage within the graphene. Thibado estimates that a single ten micron by ten micron piece of graphene may produce ten microwatts of power. While this may not seem like much, graphene’s ability to be layered heavily even in a small space could result in a practical electrical charge, one that may be used to power bioimplants. Thibado is working with the US Naval Research Laboratory to further investigate and develop the concept. Via Futurism Images via Depositphotos   (1)

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Newly discovered property of graphene could lead to infinite clean energy

Spectacular forestry dome shines like a gem in the woods of Belgium

July 26, 2017 by  
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Like a Russian Matryoshka doll, this shining dome houses another building within its shell. Architecture studio Philippe Samyn and Partners designed the compact, oval forestry building to respond to the irregular shape of its site, which is timbered with beautiful 200-year-old oak trees. Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Photo by Daylight Liège sprl The facility is located at Marche-en-Famenne in the heart of the Ardennes Forest in Belgium . It’s dedicated to the treatment of sylviculture grains from the Walloon Region. It comprises a pre-drying zone, a storage area, and an area for treating grain. Photo by Simon SCHMITT Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Related: Desert dome camp in Jordan offers tourists “The Martian” experience An apron of reinforced concrete unifies a framework of arcs that constitute the outer skin of the building. Two smaller building placed inside house cold storage, administrative rooms and small laboratories . Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Photo by Simon SCHMITT Related: Prefab smartdome homes can pop up practically anywhere The secondary role of the interior buildings is to provide additional support to the arcs. 1691 tiles of laminated reflective glass cover the entire building and emanate a soft glow at night. + Philippe Samyn and Partners Via Archdaily Lead photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART Photo by Marie-Françoise PLISSART

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Spectacular forestry dome shines like a gem in the woods of Belgium

Modern alpine home is built on the ruins of an old rustic structure

October 25, 2016 by  
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The S.V. house retains a traditional gabled form, but the interior and the front facade are decidedly modern in design. A reinforced concrete slab connects the stone walls on the first floor, while the use of brushed larch wood for the second floor, roof, and part of the facade soften the look of the natural stone and reinforce the building’s connection to nature. Large windows overlook views of the countryside and mountains while allowing natural light to flood the interior. Related: Tiny alpine hut is a cozy refuge in the harsh yet spectacular Slovenian Alps The interior design makes efficient use of the building’s 22-square-meter footprint. “Overall space is limited but this condition and the choice of materials, helped to create that feeling of ‘hearth’ with evocative power and was one of the cardinal principles of many rural architecture as well as much of the academic architecture,” writes the architect. + Rocco Borromini Via Gessato Images via Rocco Borromini, by Marcello Mariana

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Modern alpine home is built on the ruins of an old rustic structure

Golden Le Toison d’Or complex “floats” on balloon-like frames in Brussels

February 9, 2016 by  
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Crescent-shaped cutouts give Moon Hoon’s Two Moon building its playful edge

June 26, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Crescent-shaped cutouts give Moon Hoon’s Two Moon building its playful edge Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cement bricks , exposed reinforced concrete , Goyang , moon architecture , Moon Hoon , moon-inspired architecture , reinforced concrete , seoul , Two Moon , Two Moon by Moon Hoon

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Crescent-shaped cutouts give Moon Hoon’s Two Moon building its playful edge

Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo

January 20, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: atelier tekuto , Daylighting , exposed concrete , monoclinic , polyhedral house , reinforced concrete , skylights , Tokyo        

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Polyhedral Monoclinic House Boasts Eye-Catching Geometric Skylights in Tokyo

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