Biomimicry helps nature-lovers and fragile wildlife co-exist at the Votu Hotel in Brazil

September 20, 2017 by  
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The Maraú Peninsula is a 25 mile long bar of pristine Brazilian sand, flanked by the Atlantic Ocean on one side and the tranquil Camamu Bay on the other, where one glorious beach gives way to another. With such stunning landscapes, it’s no wonder hip Brazilians are flocking to these shores. But the native mangrove forests here are one the world’s most endangered ecosystems, and great care must be taken to preserve them. GCP Arquitectura and Urbanismo’s Votu Hotel takes an unusual approach to that challenge: biomimicry––sustainable innovation inspired by nature’s proven wisdom. According to Indian legend, the peninsula’s namesake, Maraú, was a peaceful fisherman who lived in with his beautiful wife, Saquaíra. One day, while Maraú was out fishing, his neighbor, Camamu, came ashore, and he and Saquaíra fell deeply in love. Camamu took her away in his canoe, and when Maraú returned to discover her abduction, he desperately begged the gods for a faster one. They granted his lovesick plea, and away he went after her at top speed, surfing the waves and sculpting the peninsula´s curved beaches and bays as he went. Today, the region is a dreamy wonderland of rich, golden sands, rugged white cliffs, nodding coconut palms, cool waterfalls, teeming coral reefs, tranquil mangrove forests and restingas ––special forests that grows on shifting coastal dunes. Unfortunately, humans are having a massive impact on the landscape. Less than 5% of the original forest cover remains, yet 40% of its plants and 60% of its vertebrates––including a long-hair maned sloth, giant armadillo, giant otter, and unique local populations of cougar, jaguar, and ocelot––are found nowhere else in the world. New species are discovered frequently: over a thousand new flowering plants, a black-faced lion tamarin recently believed extinct, and a brightly blonde-haired capuchin monkey in recent years. Meanwhile, the mangroves and estuaries provide critical nurseries for the fish, crustaceans, and mollusks that feed these populations. Inhabitating such a precious and endangered habitat requires the region’s hotels to care for it just as they care for the visitors who come here. The Votu Hotel, designed by GCP Arquitectura and Urbanismo , embraces the challenge using biomimicry, an innovative approach to design that is in accordance with nature. GCP even has a biologist on staff––Alessandro Araujo, a Certified Biomimicry Specialist educated by Biomimicry 3.8 ––and it’s her job to enhance natural processes already at work here by tapping nature’s proven solutions ––those favored for hundreds of millions of years of evolution. Related: 6 groundbreaking examples of tech innovations inspired by biomimicry The GCP team sought to maintain and support the region’s native species while minimizing air conditioning and electricity consumption, and good water management, ventilation, and thermal comfort were also critically important. These requirements were made challenging by the vulnerability of these shores to heavy rain, floods, coastal erosion, high temperatures, salt spray, and high humidity. To solve these problems, Araujo looked at species that solve these same kinds of challenges. Prairie dogs, for instance, are social rodents that live in large colonies or towns where outside temperatures can reach 100°F in the summer and -35°F in the winter. They rely on long underground burrows to insulate them from such extremes. GCP borrowed this concept for Votu, using concrete walls and a roof garden to buffer heat. The burrows also leverage a natural process called the Bernoulli principle, in which air flow is slowed by the prairie dogs’ earthen mounds, increasing pressure and forcing air to flow quickly through the tunnels. Votu’s team mimicked this clever strategy by optimizing the position of each bungalow using computer modeling, and placing a semi-permeable guardrail in front of the prevailing winds, slowing them and drawing air into ventilation ducts below the roof. The bungalow shell itself was inspired by another biological champion, the saguaro cactus, which relies on long spines and accordion-like folds to mitigate extremes of heat and exposure. The deep folds offer partial shade, cooling air on the shaded side and creating a gradient that facilitates circulation and minimizes heat absorption. The Votu bungalows mimic this strategy with vertical, wooden, self-shading slats. Local species were consulted as well. The little houses rest on stilts, just as the native mangroves and restinga forest trees do, preserving the natural topography and allowing the unimpeded flow of rainwater and tides. Meanwhile, the kitchen takes inspiration from the toco toucan, a local bird that experiences large temperature swings, from hot days to cool nights. The large, vascularized toucan beak is an extremely efficient thermal radiator, offering the greatest thermal exchange known among animals. Heat from the kitchen is dissipated the same way: as it rises, it is drawn into a copper coil that passes through the rooftop soil. Air cools in the shade of a roof garden, and eventually returns to the kitchen: a natural air conditioner requiring no additional energy. Biomimicry is known for its reliance on a simple set of Life’s Principles, and GCP is dedicated to following them. One Araujo particularly loves is “Be resource efficient,” which the team did by relying on multifunctional design, low energy processes, recycling, and fitting form to function. The bottom of Votu’s concrete structure doubles as the bathroom wall, for instance, while the upper part forms the roof. In front of the hotel, a thicket of bamboo intercepts any run-off from the bungalows or tidal wash from the beach, acting as a living filter against salinity, bacteria, or pollutants. In back of the bungalows, graywater goes into the banana circle, while blackwater passes through a biodigester and biofilter, ending in a compost pile that fertilizes a fruit-bearing orchard for the guests to enjoy. GCP’s approach to conservation and tourism may seem unusual, but biomimicry has been growing in popularity among architects for a long time. And after all, these ideas are proven winners, nature’s survivors. Why reinvent the wheel? And maybe, just maybe, such bio-inspiration will let nature’s wild places continue to survive and thrive as we enjoy them. + GCP Arquitetura & Urbanismo

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Biomimicry helps nature-lovers and fragile wildlife co-exist at the Votu Hotel in Brazil

Tesla patent reveals plans for a new battery-swapping machine

September 20, 2017 by  
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In the not-so-far future when  electric vehicles (EV) rule the road, don’t expect to sit around in line waiting for your battery to charge. That’s because electric automaker Tesla recently filed a patent for a mobile battery swapping technology that could replace a depleted battery in under 15 minutes. In 2013, the company toyed with the idea of building stationary rigs that can replace a car’s battery pack. However, that idea never took off. Now, the EV maker is improving on the concept and has filed a patent application for a more compact, mobile version that would be placed in strategic locations where Superchargers aren’t always available. As Elektrek reports, Tesla’s original system was designed to be autonomous, while the newer one can be operated by technicians. Additionally, the original battery swap service claimed a 90-second swap, whereas the new one says “less than fifteen minutes” is more plausible. Says the patent application, “In some implementations, the battery swap system is configured for use by one or more technicians, who will monitor certain aspects of the system’s operation and make necessary inputs when appropriate. For example, the battery -swapping system can be installed at a remote location (e.g., along a highway between two cities) and one or more technicians can be stationed at the location for operating the system. This can reduce or eliminate the need for the system to have vision components, which may otherwise be needed to align the battery pack or other components. Using techniques described herein it may be possible to exchange the battery pack of a vehicle in less than fifteen minutes.” As can be seen from the application figures, the patent application references swapping Model S and Model X battery packs. Both vehicles’ battery packs have been designed to be easily swappable. Model 3’s battery pack is not, on the other hand. Because the company aims to expedite the process in 15 minutes or less, it is unlikely the system will apply to more complicated swaps. Related: Tesla to TRIPLE number of Superchargers by end of 2018 When Tesla CEO Elon Musk last mentioned the battery swap system, he said it would likely be developed to support commercial fleets — if pursued at all. Now that plans for Tesla’ all- electric Semi-Truck have been shared, Musk’s vision is coming into focus. + Tesla Via Elektrek Images via Tesla , Pixabay

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Tesla patent reveals plans for a new battery-swapping machine

Locals safe after toxic orange gas cloud dissipates over northern Spain

February 16, 2015 by  
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Click here to view the embedded video. Imagine looking out the window over your morning cup of coffee and seeing a giant orange cloud rising up from your hometown. Pretty terrifying, right? Residents of two towns in northeastern Spain were ordered indoors due to a massive cloud of toxic gas in the air but they are now breathing a bit easier. According to the Associated Press , nearly 40,000 people in the Spanish province of Catalonia were told go indoors and close their windows after an explosion at a warehouse sent an orange cloud of chemical gas into the air over the region. Now, officials in the region have given a “partial all clear for people to leave their homes,” after the cloud dissipated. Read the rest of Locals safe after toxic orange gas cloud dissipates over northern Spain Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: caladonia , chemicals , cloud , explosion , gas , igualada , nitrous , Spain , Spanish , toxic

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Locals safe after toxic orange gas cloud dissipates over northern Spain

Cozy Malacahuello Cabin is a Minimalist Winter Retreat Hidden Deep in the Chilean Forest

February 3, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Cozy Malacahuello Cabin is a Minimalist Winter Retreat Hidden Deep in the Chilean Forest Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Araucanía Region , Architecture , architecture in chile , cabins in chile , chilean architects , forest homes , Malalcahuello winter cabin , MC2 Arquitectos , rustic architecture , small homes , winter cabin In Malacahuello , wood cabins        

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Cozy Malacahuello Cabin is a Minimalist Winter Retreat Hidden Deep in the Chilean Forest

Lloyd’s of London Report Forsees Disaster in Arctic Development and Drilling

April 12, 2012 by  
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Lloyd’s of London market and the Royal Institute of International Affairs have released a new report which  predicts huge risks for those looking to invest in the Arctic. The companies believe that if economic development ramps up in the region — with estimated investments reaching $100 million within the next decade — the lack of infrastructure and gaps of knowledge about the most northernmost part of the globe could outweigh the economic benefits of their projects. To that end, Lloyd’s chief executive officer advises companies interested in the region to “step back” and think about the long term consequences of their pipeline projects, which range from oil exploration to fisheries. Read the rest of Lloyd’s of London Report Forsees Disaster in Arctic Development and Drilling Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arctic , Arctic Council , arctic exploration , canada , environmental destruction , greenland , lloyds of london , offshore drilling , oil exploration

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49 Animals Killed After Suicidal Owner Released Them

October 20, 2011 by  
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Photo: wwarby / cc For more than twelve tense hours, heavily armed police officers near Zanesville, Ohio scoured the region for big cats, bears, and other exotic animals set loose from a local wildlife farm — ultimately killing nearly 50 of the 56 escapees. Among the dead animals are 18 endangered Bengal tigers, 17 lions, two grizzly bears, six black bears, a baboon, and seven bobcats. Although the public was cautioned to rema… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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49 Animals Killed After Suicidal Owner Released Them

It’s Not Too Late to Plant a Fall Garden! What to Plant in Your Region Now

September 12, 2011 by  
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Photo Credit: themissiah , Flickr Creative Commons Attribution License . Fall gardening is rewarding in a way that can be hard to explain. You get to plant and harvest in cooler weather, which is always nice. But it’s more than that. The variety of things you can harvest that you weren’t able to during the heat of summer, the return of cool-season veggies such as spinach and lettuce — both of these are reason enough. But there’s also the sense that you’re getting the most from your garden, and that’s always … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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It’s Not Too Late to Plant a Fall Garden! What to Plant in Your Region Now

Humans Are Hardwired to Respond to Animals, Says Study

September 12, 2011 by  
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Photo: snowflakegirl / cc Whether it be the millions of livestock animals sent to the slaughterhouses every year, or the countless species endangered across the world from poaching or habitat loss, it seems too often that non-human life is a merely a commodity — though a recent study suggests that that is not how our brains see things. In fact, researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and UCLA say that the region of the human brain which dictates emotions, both positive and negative, is more responsive to the sight … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Humans Are Hardwired to Respond to Animals, Says Study

Ski resort in Arizona to make snow using sewage waste

August 26, 2011 by  
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Amit Singh: Snow Sewage water to be recycled into snow for Arizona Ski Resort Skiing as an adventure sport and the business that comes with it, have always been a lucrative option for mountain based resorts and hotels. But in the past few years, due to increased global warming and green house effect, melting snow caps have become a huge problem for both environment and the adventurers. An Arizona based holiday resort ‘Arizona Snowbowl’ has come up with a potent but controversial solution to the same problem. Very soon, they will be covering the mountains with self made snow – created out of treated sewage water. The decision had an immediate polarizing effect on the local people and the authorities. This is not the first time the resort has proposed anything this radical, even in the 1970’s they came up with the same idea but were refuted. The current movement to go green and the bank of study to prove what they are doing is safe, have made their case stronger. Snowbowl is citing an environmental protection agency report, as one of its sources. According to the report, the treated sewage water is safe for humans. As a result, Snowbowl has already started construction work on a 15 mile long pipeline. Through which they will receive 1.5 gallons of water from city of Flagstaff. On the other side of the debate, some environmentalists are not satisfied with EPA’s findings. They claim to have studies by US geological survey and university of phoenix, going contrary to ‘treated water is safe’ assumption. They further add that treated water also contains high doses of carcinogens, industrial pollutants and other harmful chemicals. Some reports also predict that this can bring a change in the soil chemistry and can be severely harmful for the natural habitat of the region. Another set of opposition is coming from the tribal population of the region. The Hopi tribe has filed a lawsuit against the resort claiming that the land is sacred to them and it should not be polluted with sewage water. Via: Discovery

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Ski resort in Arizona to make snow using sewage waste

Enormous Underground River Discovered in the Amazon

August 26, 2011 by  
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Photo: EduardoDuarte / cc The sprawling Amazon rainforest is easily one of the most fascinating and mysterious regions on the planet, what with its dark, dense vegetation that stretches across the horizon like an unimaginable vast sea of green, home to an untold number of undiscovered species — but the depths of the Amazon’s secrets just got a whole lot deeper. According to a team of Brazilian scientists, over 2 miles beneath the region’s lush surface lies an enormous underground river which runs nearly the entire length of the Amazon river…. Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Enormous Underground River Discovered in the Amazon

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