Prefab Morgan Motor Company Experience Centre uses sustainable timber

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Bath, U.K.-based Hewitt Studios has given a stunning makeover to Morgan Motor Company’s aging café, museum and showroom with the new Experience Centre, a prefabricated visitor center made from sustainably sourced timber . Designed with reusability in mind, the building takes cues from the British motor car manufacturer’s hand-built sports cars that are constructed from three recyclable core elements: ash timber, aluminum and leather. The sustainably minded building also reduces its carbon footprint with high-performance insulation, daylighting and a responsible stormwater management strategy. With more than a century of experience working with local craftsmen to construct its handmade cars, the Morgan Motor Company has built its reputation on ethical sourcing, natural materials and a focus on longevity. As a result, Hewitt Studios wanted the new Experience Centre to reflect the company’s sustainable values and used three prefabricated structures built of timber in a nod to the company’s historic ash body frames. These structures include the Jewel Box, a display space for the company’s hero car and customer handovers; a sculptural visitor entrance foyer; and an external covered car canopy that is large enough to shelter the demo car fleet. The car canopy features an undulating profile evocative of the Malvern Hills’ rolling topography. Related: Visitor center disguised as a hill to welcome visitors to Denmark’s historic Kalø Castle Ruins The architects also put new cladding and roofing atop the existing buildings and built out the internal spaces. Timber and easily recyclable aluminum flashings were used for the cladding and are detailed for easy dismantling and recycling. Metsawood Kerto laminated veneer lumber, an inexpensive off-the-shelf industrial product made with certified timber from sustainably managed forests, was also incorporated into all of the new structures, particularly in the sculptural canopies.  The architects explained, “This strategy of using a single conventional product in a number of unconventional ways delivers terrific value for Morgan, creating the impression of an expensive bespoke outcome using readily available ‘stock’ timber sections — maximum bang for their buck!” + Hewitt Studios Images via Morgan Motor Company

Here is the original:
Prefab Morgan Motor Company Experience Centre uses sustainable timber

Modular treehouse concept is inspired by wasp nests

November 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

As an entry to the Young Architects Competitions’ Tree House Module contest, the architecture team of Garvin Goepel and Christian Baumgarten have proposed a modular treehouse called Nidus Domum that is made up of two shelters inspired by wasp nests. The modules are designed to sit on the property of Vibrac castle in France to help visitors escape modern civilization. Curved in shape and designed to shelter visitors high up in the trees, Nidus Domum provides a closer connection to nature . The layering, addition and multiplication of individual elements of the modules are inspired by the way that wasps build their nests, in a similar systematic and engineered pattern. With wasps, oval-shaped nests are protected by a layer of chewed wood chips and wasp saliva, like a glue. The insects build layers next to each other in order to strengthen the inner population’s protection. Related: Treehouse hotel in Bali offers maximum views with a minimal footprint The modules interlock through single parts rather than in a continuous large surface, making the production and fabrication of the treehouse highly customizable. Panels can be adapted to specialized contextual arrangements, like tree branches, by exchanging and customizing single panels. Individual elements are designed small enough to be prefabricated in local factories, quickly transported to building sites and easily assembled. Subsequently, the modules are also easy to take apart and move to other locations. The treehouse modules are composed of 24 individual panels with a wooden frame that includes inner bent wood paneling and an outer cladding made of liana tree bark splits sourced from the building site. The first module, Nidus Dolichovespula sylvestris (Nest of a Tree Wasp), suspends from the tree high above the ground. From the shelter, inhabitants gain an elevated view through the forest toward the castle on one side and the remote wild landscape on the other. In contrast, the second module, Nidus Polistinae (Nest of a Field Wasp), has a free-standing construction. The design is elevated by pilings, so it doesn’t require a tree as structural support and maintains space for a sauna . This sauna is built using the same system and connects to a terrace poised over the lake surface. Users can steam in the sauna before dipping their feet in the cold water below. + Garvin Goepel + Christian Baumgarten Images via Christian Baumgarten

More: 
Modular treehouse concept is inspired by wasp nests

Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

April 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

The innovative team at U.K.-based Inclume has come up with a unique way to take a break from the stresses of life. Its latest design is a reclaimed wood raft that accommodates two people. The Tetra raft even features a peaceful shading canopy made out of delicate, origami paper forms. Inspired by the shape of an abstracted sail, the volume of the raft incorporates multiple tetrahedron shapes. Entirely constructed out of reclaimed materials, Tetra achieves its buoyancy thanks to three old barrels that were donated to the team. Atop the barrels is the main platform, which is made of salvaged shipping pallets provided by a local carpenter. Several discarded garden bamboo canes comprise the frame and canopy. Even the boat’s oars, which were sanded and painted with a triangular motif, were donated from a local boat club. Related: Floating ICEBERG creatively confronts global warming With its tiny size and rustic nature, the reclaimed wood raft is perfect for an escape on the water. Adding a bit of serenity to the design is a beautiful, handcrafted canopy. This canopy consists of several triangular frames, which are crafted from thread entwined with recycled paper. The canopy is then covered in origami paper forms that add whimsy to the overall design. Intricately folded by hand, the paper forms sway gently in the wind and allow natural light and shade to dance across the raft. The Tetra raft was a temporary installation that took place on a local lake. During the day, passersby were encouraged to help the team construct parts of the raft on the shore. According to the designers, the aim of the event was not only to build a temporary, water-based shelter out of reclaimed materials, but to also encourage people to participate in similar projects in their communities. + Inclume Images via Inclume

See the original post here:
Reclaimed wood raft features an origami paper canopy

A nearly century-old Copenhagen school gets an eco-friendly makeover

January 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A nearly century-old Copenhagen school gets an eco-friendly makeover

Danish architectural practice JJW Architects has used recycled bricks and Cradle-to-Cradle certified mortar to renovate Copenhagen’s Grøndalsvængets School. Originally built in 1929, the building had long been hidden away from the surrounding neighborhood; this comprehensive transformation, completed in 2019, has now integrated the structure into the urban fabric. The school has also been expanded to support modern principles of learning and a larger educational program.  The Grøndalsvængets School renovation project targeted three main objectives: an improved connection with the neighborhood, new differentiated learning environments and sustainable building practices. To better integrate the school with its surroundings, the architects first took down the tall hedge that had visually separated the school from the city. The pair of two-story buildings that were added on the outer corners of the site are topped with gabled roofs in a nod to the pitched rooflines of the area. Related: A massive pollution-fighting green wall engulfs this Dutch city hall The two new buildings were built for teaching, sports and music and are part of a greater plan to cultivate a campus-like environment within the school. In addition to the renovation of the main building, the Grøndalsvængets School’s expansion focuses on creating a flexible and differentiated learning environment that can support the needs of its students. The two new buildings were built with recycled bricks from a nearby hospital and assembled with Cradle-to-Cradle certified mortar to ensure that those bricks can be reused again in the future as part of a long-term circular economy strategy. “The old school building becomes new and the new school buildings carry on an old story from the beginning,” the architects explained in a project statement. “ New and old meet each other in respect and create a school that is cohesive and interlinked with the surrounding neighborhood.” + JJW Architects Photography by Torben Eskerod via JJW Architects

More here: 
A nearly century-old Copenhagen school gets an eco-friendly makeover

A mountain refuge in Spain is brought back to life with brickwork

April 30, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A mountain refuge in Spain is brought back to life with brickwork

In the mountains of the southeastern Spanish town of Jumilla sits “La Casa del Ángel,” a small shelter where outdoor enthusiasts have long sought shelter. To bring more people to the shelter, the local government commissioned Murcia-based firm Martin Lejarraga Oficina de Arquitectura to refurbish the small building, which had been worn down by use and the outdoor elements. In renovating the space, the architects reinforced the structural strength and clad the facade in a variety of brickwork to make the building pop against its lush green surroundings. After decades of use, La Casa del Ángel has become a known fixture in the town of Jumilla. To pay respect to the site history, the architects wanted to turn the building into a “landscape piece” that can be used internally and externally. As a result, a sculptural bench was added to the exterior that wraps around two walls while an extra opening has been added to the covered entrance area to invite passersby to take shelter beneath the roof, which has been reinforced with concrete construction. Inside, the architects improved the building’s thermal and acoustic insulation and added natural materials that create a warm and inviting atmosphere. The wood used in the structure, windows and doors complement the unique original masonry. Vertically laid brick is also used in the interiors for a portion of the walls and the floors, matching the vertically oriented brick that covers half of the facade. The other half of the facade comprises horizontally oriented brick perforated to let in light and natural ventilation. Related: Towering prefab cabins envisioned for Iceland’s rugged landscape “None of the materials are coated, taking advantage of its bareness for giving refuge also to other kind of inhabitants: plants, insects, birds, etc.,” the architects explained. “Because of all this, the refurbishing of ‘La Casa del Ángel’ turns out to be a sustainable and recognizable intervention and, on top of this, a proposal with the goal of being the shelter of people, animal and plants within the wonderful landscape it is inserted.” + Martin Lejarraga Oficina de Arquitectura Photography by David Frutos via Martin Lejarraga Oficina de Arquitectura

Go here to see the original:
A mountain refuge in Spain is brought back to life with brickwork

Old barn and granary gains a new life as an inspiring community hub

November 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Old barn and granary gains a new life as an inspiring community hub

Cambridge-based design practice MCW Architects has completed the transformation of a heritage barn and granary into an uplifting community center and home of local charity ACE Foundation . Purchased by the charity in 2009 on the outskirts of Cambridge , the Victorian farm was renovated in a two-part process, the second phase of which MCW Architects was commissioned to design and implement. In addition to refurbishing the existing structure and improving energy efficiency, the £1,500,000 second-phase transformation also included new build elements, such as the glazed hall that links the Stapleford Granary to the barn. As a champion of adult and continuing education both locally and internationally, the ACE Foundation wanted to create an inspiring place conducive to hosting all types of learning. Its vision was to transform the Victorian farm and granary into a sustainable working environment and accessible community amenity. In the first phase, the granary and surrounding outbuildings were transformed into a small performance space for 60 people, including multipurpose facilities for chamber music, lectures and exhibitions, as well as recording facilities, a seminar room and some office spaces. When MCW Architects was brought on for the second phase, the firm converted the existing barn into offices for the ACE Cultural Tours team and refurbished the ground floor of the granary — along with the cart lodge — into a creative space for fine and applied art. The glazed corridor connecting the existing structures is multipurpose and serves as a foyer, gathering space and long gallery. All areas are naturally ventilated without reliance on air conditioning. In addition to passive design components, the buildings save energy with an underfloor heating system, additional windows and skylights that let in greater daylight and energy-efficient lighting systems throughout. Related: A Michigan farmhouse is reborn as a beautiful modern vacation retreat The architects said, “The redevelopment of this sensitive site was carried out in a way that retains the character of the existing fabric and spaces whilst being able to breathe new life into the place so that it can support and sustain the uses and needs of the Foundation into the future.” + MCW Architects Photography by Jim Stephenson and ACE Foundation via MCW Architects

More here:
Old barn and granary gains a new life as an inspiring community hub

Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

January 1, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

Sustainable architecture doesn’t have to come at the cost of beauty. Take, for example, this lovely refurbished home in Melbourne with its elegantly exposed timber frame, modern decor, and eco-certified building materials. Foomann Architects led the redesign, titled Ballantyne Street, to meet the client’s brief for a sustainable home where they intend to live in forever. Foomann Architects preserved much of the single-story dwelling’s original structure, including the front, but replaced the 1990s extension in the rear with a more modern addition that houses an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen, study, as well as a new bedroom. The renovation and expansion accommodates the client’s family of five and visiting guests. In contrast to the home’s original and rather unassuming frontage, the new modern addition is wrapped in full-height glazing that lets in natural light and views of a fenced-in backyard. “The design was approached in this context; to be no bigger than required and enduring,” wrote the architects. “This resonated strongly with our practice; every decision weighing up cost, longevity and environmental impact.” The modern addition features an interior mainly made of masonry and glass broken up by beautiful exposed timber framing —made of composite laminated lumber veneer —integrated with joinery, echoed in the furnishings, and extended across rooms to the outdoor spaces. The joinery is also integrated with concealed lighting for a clean and minimalist appearance. Related: Solar-powered forever home is a modern take on the rustic farmhouse The dedication to sourcing eco-certified and durable materials as well as the design of compact room sizes earned the project a Commendation for sustainability in the ArchiTeam 2017 Awards . + Foomann Architects Via Dezeen Images by Willem-Dirk du Toit

Continued here: 
Renovated forever home strives to minimize its carbon footprint

Stunning Tournesol swimming pool in France opens up like a futuristic flower

August 1, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stunning Tournesol swimming pool in France opens up like a futuristic flower

The swimming pool is one among several dome-shaped swimming pools, named Tournesol, built in France during the 1970s and 1980s. Designed by architect Bernard Schoeller, the column-free dome structures resemble sunflowers and can be partially opened in the summer. Their compact form makes it difficult to introduce new auxiliary spaces without significantly compromising the integrity of the original design. Related: Shell House provides unlimited peace and tranquility in Kazahkstan Urbane Kultur and Hi-Macs demolished the extensions built over time and moved the changing rooms to allow three stainless steel basins to take place under the dome. The extension, independent from the original structure, houses the entrance hall, changing rooms, office spaces and technical rooms. Several transparent parts offer a stronger connection between the halls, pools and locker rooms. + Urbane Kultur + Hi-Macs Via Yanko Design Photos by Jean Baptiste Dorner

See more here:
Stunning Tournesol swimming pool in France opens up like a futuristic flower

Massive Park Hill Post-War Project Being Regenerated into a Colorful and Bright Housing Complex

October 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Massive Park Hill Post-War Project Being Regenerated into a Colorful and Bright Housing Complex

Read the rest of Massive Park Hill Post-War Project Being Regenerated into a Colorful and Bright Housing Complex Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green renovation , HawkinsBrown , park hill , refurbishment , regeneration , sheffield , social housing , social housing project , studio egret , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , UK , urban splash

Read the rest here:
Massive Park Hill Post-War Project Being Regenerated into a Colorful and Bright Housing Complex

The EPA Gives the Edison2 eVLC an Amazing 245 mpge Rating!

October 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The EPA Gives the Edison2 eVLC an Amazing 245 mpge Rating!

Last year, a team driving a gas-powered Edison2 VLC (Very Light Car) won the X Prize Mainstream Class, after which the company hinted that a similar car with “other power sources” could cure range anxiety. In preliminary testing of their subsequent eVLC , an electric version of the same car, Edison2 reported an astonishing 310 miles per gallon equivalent in testing. That’s not an EPA-certified number, but now the EPA has ruled on the eVLC and given it an amazing 245 mpge official rating! And that’s not all. Those same tests proved the eVLC has a 114-mile range in its small 10.5-kWh battery and can recharge on a standard household outlet in just 6 hours. This is efficient enough to scrap the need for an electric vehicle charging infrastructure completely if all electric cars were this quick-charging. Read the rest of The EPA Gives the Edison2 eVLC an Amazing 245 mpge Rating! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alternative transportation , Edison2 eVLC , electric car , electric vehicle , EPA fuel economy rating , fuel efficiency , green automotive design , green transportation , mpg equivalent , MPGe

See the original post here:
The EPA Gives the Edison2 eVLC an Amazing 245 mpge Rating!

Bad Behavior has blocked 3597 access attempts in the last 7 days.