MVRDV unveils futuristic hotel whose rooms can be configured in countless ways

October 24, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MVRDV unveils futuristic hotel whose rooms can be configured in countless ways

Could flexible architecture be the future of urban design ? Prolific Dutch architects MVRDV just unveiled one very colorful hotel whose nine rooms can be transformed into a variety of configurations. The funky hotel – called (W)ego – is an example of how flexible architecture can help urban areas adapt to diverse needs quickly and effectively — whether it’s making room for growing families, providing student housing, or creating shelters for refugees. The 30-foot-tall hotel is the center of the firm’s Dutch Design Week installation called The Future City is Flexible. In it the firm proposes a new urban design model that is suited to the “users’ most elaborate fantasies.” The hotel has a total of nine rooms, each of which is designated by ultra-vibrant colors and quirky features geared to a variety of tastes. Related: Fully-furnished shipping containers form unique prefab hotel in Manchester The life-sized installation allows visitors to negotiate with each other in order to find the perfect living space of their dreams. The interactive method is based on the idea of creating a participatory process in order to achieve true happiness, “Through gaming and other tools, (W)ego explores participatory design processes to model the competing desires and egos of each resident in the fairest possible way,” explains MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas. The hotel, which is currently on display in Eindhoven, was created in collaboration with The Why Factory , the firm’s own research lab that studies how cities across the world will deal with issues such as climate change and population growth in the future. + MVRDV + The Why Factory Via Dezeen Photography by Ossip van Duivenbode

Original post: 
MVRDV unveils futuristic hotel whose rooms can be configured in countless ways

Maidan Tent aims to improve life in refugee camps with pop-up public space

May 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Maidan Tent aims to improve life in refugee camps with pop-up public space

A Milan-based design studio created a portable pop-up building that aims to improve the lives of refugees. Named the Maidan Tent , the multifunctional 200-square-meter structure can host up to 100 people and is designed for easy installation and transportation to allow for deployment in almost any refugee camp . The design team also teamed up with Austrian nonprofit Echo100Plus to launch a crowdfunding campaign that hopes to donate the first-ever Maidan Tent to the Ritsona refugee camp in Greece. Most refugee camps are only designed to meet the basic necessities of survival, with public gathering spaces often overlooked. The Maidan Tent design team wants to fill this gap with their design of a beautiful airy tent named after the Arabic word for a public square. The tent is made up of eight subdivided areas that provide a diversity of spaces, including outdoor shaded verandas, semi-private spaces, and a large open common space in the center. The large openings on all sides of the tent allow for natural ventilation . The Maidan team writes: “The structure is designed with the following psychological aspects in mind: The round shape forms a center and is open to every side, inviting people from every direction. Subdivision into various zones make it possible to form various relation – ships and a sense of common ground. The multi-functional public space is flexible and can be quickly adapted to people’s needs. The Maidan tent is 4 meters high and has an area of 200 square meters that can accommodate more than a hundred people.” Related: German architecture students and refugees build a beautiful timber community center The Maidan Tent is designed for all climate zones and weather types and the aluminum skeleton is covered with a strong Pe + Pes textile that is resistant to water, strong winds, and fire . You can help bring the first Maidan Tent to Ritsona refugee camp, home to 700 refugees, by submitting a pledge to their Indiegogo campaign here . + Maidan Tent

View original post here:
Maidan Tent aims to improve life in refugee camps with pop-up public space

Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

May 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

Design nonprofit Architecture for a Change continues their life-changing work with the completion of a new church for the Chimphamba community in Malawi. Built to replace a dilapidated community center, the Rural Church draws inspiration from the traditional African drum with its circular floor plan. The building relies on the thermal mass of earthen bricks, wall openings, and a ventilation tower to stay naturally cool in Malawi’s subtropical heat. Created in collaboration with Youth of Malawi and the chiefs of the Chimphamba community, Architecture for a Change’s Rural Church was designed to meet the skill set of local builders while providing some new learning opportunities. The building was constructed with a cylindrical form, a shape that symbolizes safety and protection in the community. Citing the community’s use of cylindrical chicken coops and maize storage containers, the architects say the Christian church’s shape “was used as a metaphor for the design: as space that will protect and safeguard the sense of community in Chimphamba.” Three boxes, built of locally burnt red brick to match the rural vernacular, are inserted into the round building. The first box serves as a foyer while a second, taller box uses the stack effect to function as a ventilation tower for natural cooling . Using temperature differences and lower air pressures at higher heights, the ventilation tower passively pulls hot air to the top of the building and sucks fresh air into the building. Related: Architecture For a Change Designs Lightweight Church for South African Zandspruit Community Small holes punctuate the building to let in natural light and ventilation. The church’s roof symbolizes a Christian cross and is covered with translucent roof sheeting to allow additional natural light in. The building was completed in early 2017 with a budget of $35,000 USD. + Architecture for a Change Images via Architecture for a Change

Read more:
Church built for $35k stays naturally cool in Malawi

German architecture students and refugees build a beautiful timber community center

February 22, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on German architecture students and refugees build a beautiful timber community center

Architecture students from Germany’s University of Kaiserslautern teamed up with 25 refugees to build a timber community center for a refugee camp in Mannheim, Germany. Completed as part of the “Building Together—Learning Together” program, the 550-square-meter structure breathes new life into the bare-bones surroundings with a beautiful new gathering space. The design/build project prioritized ecological and cost-effective design without compromising construction quality. The timber community center was created in response to the desolate conditions of the Mannheim refugee camp located on the former American Spinelli Barracks. To aid in the refugee crisis , 18 architecture students teamed up with 25 refugees to design the new building, from concept to final build. The students lived at the refugee camp and worked intensively for six weeks from mid-August to the end of October to realize the project and help teach their new coworkers basic building skills and German. Related: Self-shaping shelters that could revolutionize emergency housing The community center is made almost entirely of lightweight untreated timber , with the larger components prefabricated in a hangar of the former military facility and later assembled onsite. The main walls are clad in Douglas fir while the latticework walls are used as structural support, allowing for natural ventilation and light while also creating a beautiful dappled play of light and shadow. The center wraps around a small garden courtyard as well as a large outdoor events space. Built-in seating is arranged around this area, shielded from the elements by a two-meter-wall canopy and partitions. The center also includes a pair of storerooms that can be adapted for different uses in the future. + Atelier U20 Via ArchDaily Images © Yannick Wegner

Read the original: 
German architecture students and refugees build a beautiful timber community center

6 designs to help refugees live a better life

February 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 6 designs to help refugees live a better life

Read the rest of 6 designs to help refugees live a better life

Go here to see the original:
6 designs to help refugees live a better life

Bad Behavior has blocked 2897 access attempts in the last 7 days.