The threatened Great Barrier Reef is estimated to be worth $42 billion

June 26, 2017 by  
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Our unsustainable habits are propelling climate change , and as a result, the Great Barrier Reef is under immense environmental stress.  Coral bleaching has reached record levels and no one knows if or when the coral will ever recover. This is concerning not just from an environmental perspective, but, as a new report by Deloitte Access Economics shows, that loss of the reef would represent an “economic catastrophe” as it is estimated to be worth $56 billion (AUS), or $42 billion (USD). As water temperatures rise, the coral expels algae living within, causing it to turn ghostly white (a phenomenon known as coral bleaching). Though consumers everywhere are changing their habits to reduce greenhouse emissions and prevent global warming from worsening, no one knows for sure how long it will take — or even if — the bleached portions will bounce back. To determine that the Great Barrier Reef’s economic worth, the report took into consideration a few factors. All in all, it was concluded that $29 Billion (AUS) is generated from the tourism industry — including the creation of 64,000 jobs, $24 billion (AUS) to indirect or non-use value (describing people who have heard of the reef but haven’t yet visited) and $3 billion (AUS) from recreational use, such as boating. Commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the report is the first in the world to calculate the economic value of the reef.   Survey answers from 1,500 Australian and international respondents from 10 countries were taken into account and ended up revealing the extent to which some people have come to depend on the Unesco World Heritage Site. Said U.S. politician and environmentalist Al Gore in the report , “This timely report is a much needed, holistic view of the incredible economic value and opportunities provided by the Great Barrier Reef. Any failure to protect this indispensable natural resource would have profound impacts not only to Australia but around the world.” Related: Rising ocean temperatures are cooking the Great Barrier Reef to death According to Great Barrier Reef Foundation director Steve Sargent, the report “sends a clear message that the Great Barrier Reef—as an ecosystem , as an economic driver, as a global treasure—is too big to fail.” He added that at $42 billion (USD), “the reef is valued at more than 12 Sydney Opera Houses.” Located off the coast of Queensland, Australia, the largest coral reef system in the world isn’t just affected by warming waters. As Gizmodo reports, farming runoff, urban development. cyclic outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish and boating accidents are also damaging the reef at an increasing rate. Experts are presently collaborating to find solutions which will preserve the Great Barrier Reef. Ideas so far include the construction of coral nurseries, increasing the efficiency of starfish culls and cutting greenhouse gas emissions to prevent a further increase in sea surface temperatures. + Deloitte Via Gizmodo Images via Pixabay  ( 1 , 2 )

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The threatened Great Barrier Reef is estimated to be worth $42 billion

Unprecedented Bleaching Leaves the Great Barrier Reef Terminal

April 28, 2017 by  
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In 2016, the Great Barrier Reef saw the worst bleaching event on record — two-thirds (67 percent) of corals in the northern sector of the reef died after being exposed to unusually warm currents. While experts warned that these bleaching events…

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Unprecedented Bleaching Leaves the Great Barrier Reef Terminal

Scientists discover an enormous, hidden reef behind the Great Barrier Reef

August 29, 2016 by  
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New laser data from the Royal Australian Navy has revealed a massive reef behind the rapidly dying Great Barrier Reef. Giant fields of circular, donut-shaped mounds, between 200 and 300 meters in diameter, are created by a type of green algae. Unfortunately, this reef is likely facing the same threats as the neighboring Great Barrier Reef . A collaboration between James Cook University , the University of Sydney , and Queensland University of Technology led to the discovery of just how large these fields are. Dr. Robin Beaman of JCU said in his co-authored paper , “We’ve known about these geological structures in the northern Great Barrier Reef since the 1970s and 80s, but never before has the true nature of their shape, size and vast scale been revealed.” Related: Startling video shows coral bleaching in action The mounds are bioherms, or organic reef-like mounds, made by the growth of Halimeda green algae . Upon death, they form small limestone flakes similar to the shape of cornflakes and mounds begin to form over time. These Halimeda bioherms are between 200-300 meters wide and 10 meters deep. Thanks to the new glimpse into the area, over 6,000 square kilometers have now been mapped. The closer look has raised questions of environmental preservation and historical documentation. Associate Professor Jody Webster of the University of Sydney said, “As a calcifying organism, Halimeda may be susceptible to ocean acidification and warming,” and wonders about the extent of possible damage so far. Dr. Beaman is interested in what researchers can learn from bioherm sediment samples about changes in the reef systems over the last 10,000 years. Further impending research will help scientists better understand the structures, their impact, and their future. Via Daily Mail Images via Wikipedia , Wikimedia

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Scientists discover an enormous, hidden reef behind the Great Barrier Reef

Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching is now more widespread than ever

April 4, 2016 by  
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New research, backed up by troubling photographic evidence, shows that coral bleaching is now more prevalent in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef than ever before . Bleaching occurs when ocean temperatures rise and coral evicts the algae that give the reef its typically colorful appearance. Underwater observations suggest the problem is increasing, and upcoming aerial surveys will offer an even better view of how far the coral bleaching has spread in the northern part of the reef. Read the rest of Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching is now more widespread than ever

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Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching is now more widespread than ever

Artist Jason deCaires Taylor Builds an Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues

March 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Artist Jason deCaires Taylor Builds an Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , artificial reef , coral reef , eco-art , environmental art , green art , green design , jason decaires taylor , marine life , mexico , reef , sustainable design , The Silent Evolution , underwater sculpture , water park        

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Artist Jason deCaires Taylor Builds an Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues

Photo: Bright red fish play hide-n-go-seek under coral

November 23, 2013 by  
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Coral reefs are famed for their vivid colors, which come not only from the corals themselves but the brilliant-hued species of fish that flit in and around the reef. Here, vermillion fish contrast with the deep blue of the water.

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Photo: Bright red fish play hide-n-go-seek under coral

Pedia-Pod aims to "make kids feel like they’re not in a hospital"

November 22, 2013 by  
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This pediatric care unit showcases how sustainable and kid-friendly design can come together.

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Pedia-Pod aims to "make kids feel like they’re not in a hospital"

In-depth LED bulb reviews and teardowns: More than you ever wanted to know about LEDs… (videos)

November 22, 2013 by  
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It’s not for everybody, but if you are the target audience, you’ve probably already stopped reading this and have clicked to find the reviews.

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In-depth LED bulb reviews and teardowns: More than you ever wanted to know about LEDs… (videos)

Artist Builds Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues

November 11, 2010 by  
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Located off the coast of Cancun, Mexico, artist Jason deCaires Taylor has created an incredible artificial reef of statues he calls the Silent Evolution . A compelling installation that took several months to complete, Silent Evolution embodies a spirit that shifts between sadness and awe, all while reminding us of the intricate relationship between man and nature.

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Artist Builds Incredible Coral Reef from Sunken Statues

Oslo’s All-Electric Car Share Program Just Reached 1,000 Members

November 11, 2010 by  
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Some mornings we here at Inhabitat like to grab a cup of coffee, cozy up on the couch and dream about future days of sharing electric vehicles in our urban havens. But dream no longer – with EV car share programs like the “Cell” in the pipeline, this electrifying dream is becoming a reality.  Move About , Oslo, Norway’s EV car share program, has  just hit an impressive 1,000 members! An all-electric vehicle phenomena, customers of Move About pay a mere NOK 100 (or $17) for a monthly membership and are given an all-access pass to a fleet of EVs they can take around town for just $17 an hour. As a city already dominated by Think City electric vehicles, Norway is setting an inspiring green model ready to propel the rest of the world towards a more sustainable future

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Oslo’s All-Electric Car Share Program Just Reached 1,000 Members

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