McDonald’s new paper straws: thick, soggy, hard to recycle

August 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Looks like the shakes at some McDonald’s restaurants aren’t the only things that are thick. Word is the fast food chain’s paper straws introduced a year ago to keep in tune with “protecting the environment” are hard to recycle , because they are too thick and become soggy in drinks. The new paper straws were introduced in 2018 after a trial basis to 1,361 McDonald’s franchises located throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland. Related: McDonald’s creates McHives to raise awareness of the world’s decreasing bee populations. The problem with these straws was first reported by the U.K.’s The Sun newspaper, which published an internal McDonald’s memorandum stating the fast food chain’s paper straws “are not yet recyclable and should be disposed of in general waste until further notice.” “While the materials are recyclable, their current thickness makes it difficult for them to be processed by our waste solution providers, who also help us recycle our paper cups,” a McDonald’s spokesman told the U.K.’s Press Association news agency. Although the original plastic straws could be recycled more easily, the European Union along with the British government has opted to move to banning plastic straws by 2020 and wants chains like McDonald’s to halt using such products. “The government’s ambitious plans, combined with strong customer opinion, has helped to accelerate the move away from plastic , and I’m proud that we’ve been able to play our part in helping to achieve this societal change,” Paul Pomroy, CEO of McDonald’s U.K. and Ireland, said in a press release at the time. Not surprisingly, the new paper straws haven’t been much of a hit from the get-go, according to other reports. For example, many social media users have been busy commenting that the paper straws get too soggy in drinks. Additionally, a formal petition asking McDonald’s to return to its former plastic straws has garnered more than 50,000 signatures. Via CNN Image via Meghan Rodgers

Read the original here:
McDonald’s new paper straws: thick, soggy, hard to recycle

Eastman advances two chemical recycling options

August 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The chemical company’s previous efforts were ahead of the times, but market conditions now appear to be in its favor.

Originally posted here:
Eastman advances two chemical recycling options

Innovation will be central for achieving ‘water for all’

August 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

What’s on deck for Stockholm World Water Week 2019.

More here:
Innovation will be central for achieving ‘water for all’

Electric bus giant Proterra gears up for new market: commercial trucks

August 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The automotive and energy storage company is looking to move its electrifying technology to new buyers.

View original post here:
Electric bus giant Proterra gears up for new market: commercial trucks

AI-powered weather forecasts are improving predictions for smart grids’ energy outputs

August 7, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

National Grid has teamed up with the Alan Turing Institute to use machine learning to more accurately predict generation levels from wind and solar technology.

More:
AI-powered weather forecasts are improving predictions for smart grids’ energy outputs

5 lessons from China’s push to increase domestic recycling

July 30, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 5 lessons from China’s push to increase domestic recycling

Public-private partnerships and education are central to its plans.

Here is the original:
5 lessons from China’s push to increase domestic recycling

10 questions with Ultra Capital, infrastructure financiers greasing the circular economy’s wheels

July 17, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 10 questions with Ultra Capital, infrastructure financiers greasing the circular economy’s wheels

From alternative fuels to advanced recycling technologies, director Emily Landsburg chats about what drives the private equity fund’s investment decisions.

View original post here:
10 questions with Ultra Capital, infrastructure financiers greasing the circular economy’s wheels

Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

June 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

Boston’s mayor Marty Walsh wants to know: are you going to compost that? Because chances are you should. Walsh has announced a plan to ensure that 100 percent of compostable waste is diverted from landfills by 2050. According the city’s estimates, 36 percent of the trash that Bostonians are throwing away should be composted and 39 percent should be recycled. This is a huge amount of waste going to the wrong place (landfills or incinerators) and ultimately equates to 6 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions . Related: Washington becomes the first state to allow human composting Mayor Walsh is determined to reach carbon neutrality by 2050 and believes an overhaul of the waste services in the city can make major progress in the right direction. The city has requested proposals from companies willing to provide curbside composting services to Boston residents for a subscription fee, which the government plans to subsidize. Right across the Charles River, the neighboring city of Cambridge already started providing free curbside composting for residents last year, but Boston has six times the population. Boston also plans to expand the window of time that yard waste is collected and launch a textile pick-up program. Last year, the city also announced a plan to ban single-use plastic bags throughout the city. “Preparing Boston for climate change means ensuring our city is sustainable, both now and in the future,” Walsh said. “We need to lead and design city policies that work for our residents and for the environment and world we depend upon. These initiatives will lead Boston toward becoming a zero-waste city and invest in the future of residents and generations to come.” To help out with the transition toward zero-waste , Boston received a grant from Cocoa-Cola to increase the number of recycling bins, signage and trash services in city parks. Boston was one of seven cities to receive this pilot funding from Coca-Cola. The switch to a more comprehensive waste system will require re-educating Bostonians about how to recycle and what to compost. The city’s website recommends residents download the city’s free “ Trash Day ” app, with which users can look up specific items and learn exactly how to dispose of them. Via Curbed Image via Shutterstock

See more here: 
Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

This egg carton is made out of seeds that sprout when replanted

June 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This egg carton is made out of seeds that sprout when replanted

As the world teeters on the brink of suffocating from single-use products, some designers are quickly coming up with ingenious ways to reduce our waste. For example, Greek designer George Bosnas has just unveiled the Biopack, a compact egg carton made out of cleared paper pulp, flour, starch and biological legume seeds. Instead of throwing out the eco-friendly container at the end of its use, it can be planted directly into the ground to sprout green plants. According to Bosnas, the inspiration behind the Biopack came from the conundrum that recycling presents. Although communities and citizens around the world are trying to reap the benefits of recycling, the actual process is quite complicated, expensive and usually not as eco-friendly as one would think. An arduous task from start to finish, true recycling involves loads of organization, including transportation, sorting, processing and converting materials into new goods to be, once again, transported back into the market. Related: Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging With this in mind, the truest, most ecological form of recycling is to take a single-use product and naturally turn it into something ecologically beneficial for the environment. Enter the innovative Biopack — a simple box that holds up to four eggs. Made out of cleared paper pulp, flour, starch and seeds, the sustainable packaging is quite dense to protect the eggs from breaking. Once the eggs are used, instead of throwing away the box or shipping it off to be recycled, the entire egg carton can be planted into soil. With a little watering, the bio-packaging breaks down naturally, leaving the seeds to sprout into green plants, which takes approximately 30 days. Not only does the sustainable packaging create a full-cycle system that turns a product into a plant, but according to Bosnas, growing legumes actually increases soil fertility. A win-win for the world! + George Bosnas Images via George Bosnas

Here is the original post: 
This egg carton is made out of seeds that sprout when replanted

Apple and Best Buy reveal their circular visions (and a new partnership)

June 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Apple and Best Buy reveal their circular visions (and a new partnership)

Two very different titans in consumer electronics are each aiming to advance the circular economy in their own ways.

Read more here:
Apple and Best Buy reveal their circular visions (and a new partnership)

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1279 access attempts in the last 7 days.