Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

June 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Boston’s mayor Marty Walsh wants to know: are you going to compost that? Because chances are you should. Walsh has announced a plan to ensure that 100 percent of compostable waste is diverted from landfills by 2050. According the city’s estimates, 36 percent of the trash that Bostonians are throwing away should be composted and 39 percent should be recycled. This is a huge amount of waste going to the wrong place (landfills or incinerators) and ultimately equates to 6 percent of the city’s greenhouse gas emissions . Related: Washington becomes the first state to allow human composting Mayor Walsh is determined to reach carbon neutrality by 2050 and believes an overhaul of the waste services in the city can make major progress in the right direction. The city has requested proposals from companies willing to provide curbside composting services to Boston residents for a subscription fee, which the government plans to subsidize. Right across the Charles River, the neighboring city of Cambridge already started providing free curbside composting for residents last year, but Boston has six times the population. Boston also plans to expand the window of time that yard waste is collected and launch a textile pick-up program. Last year, the city also announced a plan to ban single-use plastic bags throughout the city. “Preparing Boston for climate change means ensuring our city is sustainable, both now and in the future,” Walsh said. “We need to lead and design city policies that work for our residents and for the environment and world we depend upon. These initiatives will lead Boston toward becoming a zero-waste city and invest in the future of residents and generations to come.” To help out with the transition toward zero-waste , Boston received a grant from Cocoa-Cola to increase the number of recycling bins, signage and trash services in city parks. Boston was one of seven cities to receive this pilot funding from Coca-Cola. The switch to a more comprehensive waste system will require re-educating Bostonians about how to recycle and what to compost. The city’s website recommends residents download the city’s free “ Trash Day ” app, with which users can look up specific items and learn exactly how to dispose of them. Via Curbed Image via Shutterstock

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Boston’s mayor announces curbside compost program

This egg carton is made out of seeds that sprout when replanted

June 24, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

As the world teeters on the brink of suffocating from single-use products, some designers are quickly coming up with ingenious ways to reduce our waste. For example, Greek designer George Bosnas has just unveiled the Biopack, a compact egg carton made out of cleared paper pulp, flour, starch and biological legume seeds. Instead of throwing out the eco-friendly container at the end of its use, it can be planted directly into the ground to sprout green plants. According to Bosnas, the inspiration behind the Biopack came from the conundrum that recycling presents. Although communities and citizens around the world are trying to reap the benefits of recycling, the actual process is quite complicated, expensive and usually not as eco-friendly as one would think. An arduous task from start to finish, true recycling involves loads of organization, including transportation, sorting, processing and converting materials into new goods to be, once again, transported back into the market. Related: Designer creates algae-sourced alternative for plastic packaging With this in mind, the truest, most ecological form of recycling is to take a single-use product and naturally turn it into something ecologically beneficial for the environment. Enter the innovative Biopack — a simple box that holds up to four eggs. Made out of cleared paper pulp, flour, starch and seeds, the sustainable packaging is quite dense to protect the eggs from breaking. Once the eggs are used, instead of throwing away the box or shipping it off to be recycled, the entire egg carton can be planted into soil. With a little watering, the bio-packaging breaks down naturally, leaving the seeds to sprout into green plants, which takes approximately 30 days. Not only does the sustainable packaging create a full-cycle system that turns a product into a plant, but according to Bosnas, growing legumes actually increases soil fertility. A win-win for the world! + George Bosnas Images via George Bosnas

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This egg carton is made out of seeds that sprout when replanted

Apple and Best Buy reveal their circular visions (and a new partnership)

June 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Two very different titans in consumer electronics are each aiming to advance the circular economy in their own ways.

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Apple and Best Buy reveal their circular visions (and a new partnership)

How artificial intelligence helps recycling become more circular

June 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The process of sorting things for reuse gets faster and more specific.

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How artificial intelligence helps recycling become more circular

7 ways for cities to slash plastic pollution

June 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Let’s send community cleanup days to the trash heap.

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7 ways for cities to slash plastic pollution

Upcycled plastic bottles are used to create this durable emergency shelter

June 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Innovative design start-up Six Miles Across London Limited (small.) has just unveiled an emergency shelter made almost entirely out of upcycled plastic bottles . The Recycled BottleHouse is a pyramid-shaped shelter that was constructed from a bamboo frame covered in discarded plastic bottles. Recently debuted at the Clerkenwell Design Week, the innovative shelter is an example of how a truly circular economy is feasible with just a little design know-how. Related: MIT students find a way to make stronger concrete with plastic bottles Designed to be used for emergencies in remote parts of the world, the Recycled BottleHouse shelter is made out of low-cost, lightweight and sustainably sourced materials and built to be thermally comfortable. The frame of the structure is made out of thin bamboo rods joined together in the form of a tipi. The frame is then entirely covered with discarded plastic bottles filled with hay to provide privacy to the interior. For extra stability, the shelter flooring is made out of bottles filled with sand that are burrowed into the landscape. Next, hollow bottles are placed around the main bamboo frame to create four walls with a front door that swings upward. Inside, the space provides protection from both solar radiation and precipitation. The interior also boasts a lantern made from plastic bottles powered by the shelter’s integrated PV panels . According to small. founder Ricky Sandhu, the emergency shelter was inspired by the need to find feasible and sustainable solutions to the world’s growing plastic problem. Sandhu said, “We believe ‘BottleHouse’ provides a new formula for the world’s growing problem of discarded plastic bottles by transforming them into rapidly deployable, protective and valuable shelters in areas of the world that need them the most and, at the same time, setting a new mission for the rest of the world to think about and contribute to — a new circular economy .” + Six Miles Across London Limited Images via Six Miles Across London Limited

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Upcycled plastic bottles are used to create this durable emergency shelter

Earth911 Quiz #63: Recycling How-to Challenge!

June 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Do you know the steps for recycling these common household … The post Earth911 Quiz #63: Recycling How-to Challenge! appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Earth911 Quiz #63: Recycling How-to Challenge!

Michelin is letting the air out of its tires: Why that matters for sustainable mobility

June 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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The 130-year-old French tire company will test the technology first on electric passenger vehicles in collaboration with General Motors.

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Michelin is letting the air out of its tires: Why that matters for sustainable mobility

A conversation with Google’s circularity maven, CSO Kate Brandt

June 10, 2019 by  
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A Q&A with Google’s resident circular economy expert and Circularity 19 advisor on how tech matters to new systems.

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A conversation with Google’s circularity maven, CSO Kate Brandt

Why the US-China trade war is leaving firms vulnerable to soy risk

June 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

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China’s growing demand for soy is leaving billions of dollars of investments exposed to deforestation risks, CDP report finds.

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Why the US-China trade war is leaving firms vulnerable to soy risk

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