Village-inspired office in Jakarta is topped with living trees and a green roof

August 21, 2017 by  
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The new Aedas- designed Unilever HQ in Jakarta references Indonesia ‘s villages to create a welcoming environment filled with natural sunlight and plenty of green space. The building features green roofing, a main square and winding streets to mimic the organization of a traditional village, along with floor-to-ceiling louvered windows that fill the interior with light. The new building sits in the BSD Green Office Park, Indonesia’s first green office campus masterplanned by Aedas. It houses the company’s four separate offices in Jakarta under one roof and combines its modern vision with the country’s historic architectural influences. Related: Aedas unveils mountainous mixed-use building that looks like a stack of books The large complex incorporates three main elements–community, diversity and nature–into the design and focused on facilitating collaboration while maintaining privacy. Group and individual workspaces are organized into zones to encourage collaboration. The ground floor houses public and common areas organized around a central atrium. A variety of elements– Indonesian batik fabrics, recycled teak timber , and furniture– reference the traditional Indonesian culture. Grey aluminium blade louvers cover the curtain wall system and provides shade while reducing heat gain . Natural light reaches all interior spaces thanks to the absence of enclosures. + Aedas Via World Architecture News

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Village-inspired office in Jakarta is topped with living trees and a green roof

Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions

February 6, 2017 by  
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Austin Maynard Architects is taking a stand against McMansions. Tired of seeing Australia’s handsome old shacks demolished to make way for less culturally interesting housing, the Australian architecture firm completed a beautiful renovation and addition to an old beach shack in the town of Lorne. The restored project, called the Dorman House, is a lovely celebration of the Australian beach shack vernacular with stunning ocean views and a modern and eco-friendly design. The Dorman House comprises two parts: the restoration of an old post-war beach shack that remains mostly unchanged, and the addition of a contemporary new extension. The clients, Kate and Grant, had asked Austin Maynard Architects to preserve the original shack and add an extension that would allow for clear and elevated ocean views without dominating or damaging the existing structure. Although the simplest solution would have been to bulldoze the existing shack and start anew, the architects and clients sought the more sustainable solution. “Modest, humble shacks are being replaced with incongruous and unnecessary McMansions ,” wrote the architects. “Increasingly we see a duplication of the suburban home where once stood the shack. Through this process we not only lose important parts of our built heritage, we also lose a significant part of our social and emotional diversity. We lose parts of ourselves. At Austin Maynard Architects we do our best to avoid the simple temptation of demolishing and replacing. Where extensions are required/desired, we aim to retain and respect the existing shack and its scale.” Related: Gorgeous solar-powered THAT House is an eco-friendly rebel “with just enough space” The new extension is an elevated timber box that sits atop the original shack and comprises an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living room accessed via a spiral staircase. The interior is lined with Silvertop Ash and opens up to gorgeous ocean views and breezes through full-height windows. Most of the glass faces north and all windows are double glazed with thermally separated frames, while solar shades are in place to minimize solar heat gain in summer. The exterior cladding will develop a gray patina over time. The structure directly below the timber box is clad in polycarbonate and is used as a light-filled bedroom. Recycled timber decking was used in the construction and locally sourced materials were also used wherever possible. + Austin Maynard Architects Images via Austin Maynard Architects

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Austin Maynard Architects restores a beach shack in their crusade against McMansions

Beautiful solar-powered soccer facility stays naturally cool in Australias heat

September 2, 2016 by  
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As with all k20 Architecture’s works on Inhabitat, sustainability is at the heart of BSRF. Solar panels power low-energy light fittings, while rainwater is collected and reused in the toilets. Extended eaves and double-glazing protect the building from harsh glare and natural ventilation is maximized with operable windows and thermal chimneys that provide stack effect cooling. Locally sourced and manufactured material components are used wherever possible, such as the carpets made of 40% recycled content and grandstand seating constructed of recycled plastic. Low VOC paints and durable finishes can be found throughout. BSRF’s most eye-catching element is the sculptural Eureka Stockade wall, the curved west-facing timber facade that protects the playing field from the winds and sun. The wall references the makeshift wooden barricade erected in the Battle of the Eureka Stockade fought between miners and the Colonial forces of Australia in 1854. The architect’s modern interpretation of the wall features a jagged roofline with a handsome mosaic of grey ironbark, spotted gum , and stringy bark. Related: Solar-powered civic center in Australia repurposes over 80% of its original building materials “The facility is unique in that it has been designed specifically for the soccer community of regional Victoria,” write the architects. “As a result, k20 Architecture was able to customize the design to emulate the experience of a world standard soccer stadium. This is illustrated in the alignment of the primary player’s race to the centre line of the playing pitch, which enables players of all ages and standards to experience key aspects of playing on the ‘big stage.’” The BSRF is part of the first stage for a still-developing master plan for the site. The facility was recently selected as a finalist in the 2016 Sport, Recreation and Play Industry Innovation, Facility Design and Development Awards and a finalist in the 2016 Australian Timber Design Awards Fitout Featuring Timber Cladding Category. + k20 Architecture Images via k20 Architecture

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Beautiful solar-powered soccer facility stays naturally cool in Australias heat

Zoe Murphy revives unwanted furniture into gorgeous and whimsical pieces

October 5, 2015 by  
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Zoe Murphy revives unwanted furniture into gorgeous and whimsical pieces

Bangkok Builds Low-Cost Temporary Dormitories Out of Recycled Timber for Myanmar Refugees

May 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Bangkok Builds Low-Cost Temporary Dormitories Out of Recycled Timber for Myanmar Refugees Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agora architects , Bangkok architecture , Bangkok temporary architecture , CDC Dormitories Thailand , CDC School Thailand , emergency architecture , locally sourced building material , low-cost shelters , recycled building materials , recycled materials architecture , recycled timber , temporary architecture , temporary dormitories , vernacular architecture

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Bangkok Builds Low-Cost Temporary Dormitories Out of Recycled Timber for Myanmar Refugees

Melbourne Zoo’s Lemur Exhibit Features Nestled Pods Made From Recycled Timber

March 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Melbourne Zoo’s Lemur Exhibit Features Nestled Pods Made From Recycled Timber Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: exhibition spaces , Lemur exhibit Melbourne Zoo , Melbourne Zoo , Natural building materials , rattan architecture , rattan pods Zoo , rattan structures , Recycled Materials , recycled timber , Snowdon Architects , weaved architecture , Zoo exhibit        

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Melbourne Zoo’s Lemur Exhibit Features Nestled Pods Made From Recycled Timber

The Sands of the Namib Desert Swallow an Abandoned Mining Settlement in Namibia

March 6, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of The Sands of the Namib Desert Swallow an Abandoned Mining Settlement in Namibia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: abandoned town buried under sand , African diamond mining settlement , desertification , Kolmanskop mining settlement , Les Sables du Temps , Namib desert ghost town , Romain Veillon        

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The Sands of the Namib Desert Swallow an Abandoned Mining Settlement in Namibia

Eclectic Wooden Stools Made From Recycled Timber

November 30, 2010 by  
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These colorful offcut bar stools by Edwards Moore Architects are a beautiful example of eclectic upcycling.

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Eclectic Wooden Stools Made From Recycled Timber

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