Tiks cuffs aim to break the plastic waste circle

July 18, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Tiks cuffs aim to break the plastic waste circle

Companies around the globe looking for ways to battle plastic waste are coming up with innovative ways to tackle the issue. Cape Clasp, based out of Falmouth, Massachusetts, is an example of a business putting the health of the ocean front and center with the release of Tikós— a line of bracelets made from recycled plastic . While each bracelet, or cuff, represents 100 plastic bottles removed from the ocean, the message goes well beyond simply recycling plastic. The leaders at Cape Clasp believe that education is a more powerful tool than recycling. After all, the only way we will ever solve the massive single-use plastic problem is to change the habits of those causing the issue in the first place. Related: Surfing trip leads to 4Ocean cleaning coastlines around the world “Creating a new market for ocean plastic will drive its removal, but that won’t be enough to protect marine life ,” says Patrick Clarke, founder of Cape Clasp. “No matter how much plastic we remove from the water, there will always be more flowing in unless we change our habits.” So while the company turns post-consumer plastic into products, diverting that waste from landfills , their mission is to change the behaviors that produce the plastic waste currently endangering marine animals. With that in mind, each cuff stands as a reminder to the wearer. Color coded to represent different challenges, consumers can choose one or collect them all. Blue : “Bring a Bag” reminds consumers to tote your own reusable shopping bag to help conserve natural resources like petroleum (plastic) and trees (paper), plus eliminate the plastic bags tumbling down the coastline. Black : “Skip the Straw” by either asking your server to hold it when you order or by bringing your own reusable straw. Plastic straws are one of the top waste materials clogging beaches and endangering ocean wildlife . Teal : “Keep the Cup” your morning coffee comes in and find a way to reuse it. Better yet, bring your own cup in for refills and skip the single use altogether. Tan : “Clean the Coast” with every trip to the beach . Bring along a garbage bag and pick up debris as you stroll, or think big and organize a beach clean up event. With a purpose-driven mission to clean up the ocean and protect the animals, Cape Clasp has joined forces with myriad similar-minded organizations to further their goal. Donating 15 percent of their profits, the company has raised over $35,000 in the past two years, which has helped fund partners working to protect the dolphins, whales, sea turtles, sharks and the Cape Cod coastline. + Cape Clasp Images via Cape Clasp

See more here: 
Tiks cuffs aim to break the plastic waste circle

Poland Spring pledges 100% recycled bottles by 2022

June 5, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Poland Spring pledges 100% recycled bottles by 2022

This week, Nestlé Waters North America promised that its Poland Spring brand would start using 100 percent recycled bottles by 2022. The announcement is part of Nestlé’s larger pledge to increase recycled bottle use and has the potential to significantly boost the recycled plastic industry. According to the $247 billion corporation, 25 percent of all its water products will use the recycled bottles by 2021, and 50 percent will use recycled bottles by 2050. The Poland Spring brand has a huge market share in the U.S. and will amount to a significant amount of recycled bottles used annually. Related: New report reveals 70 million metric tons of plastic burned worldwide each year “We spent a lot of time designing these bottles to ensure that they move efficiently and effectively through the recycling value web. We want the bottle back,” said chief sustainability officer David Tulauskas. Tulauskas also noted that because of discrepancies in recycling programs and compliance in different cities across the country, the recycled bottle program has been difficult to streamline and roll out. Cities with stricter recycling policies actually make the process more complex, because the recycled plastic buyer must rely on consumers taking the proper measures to clean the plastic and place it in the proper recycling stream. The buying power of Poland Spring will boost the confidence and dependability of recycled plastic producers. Without secured buyers, these facilities do not have the motivation nor reliable cash flow to increase production. Poland Spring’s interest and investment in the industry has the potential to increase the amount of food-grade, high-quality PET plastic produced, which is the type of plastic needed for bottles. “They need confidence that we’re going to buy from them for the long term to make sure that it’s worthwhile for them to make the investment,” Tulauskas explained to CNN . Last year, Americans used 50 billion plastic water bottles and only recycled 23 percent of them. That means that approximately $1 billion in recyclable plastic is wasted every year when it could be re-routed back to companies to quench the thirst for plastic next year. + Nestlé Via The Hill and CNN Image via Mike Mozart

Original post: 
Poland Spring pledges 100% recycled bottles by 2022

Earliest human air pollution detected in glaciers

June 5, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Earliest human air pollution detected in glaciers

Researchers in Peru have discovered some of the earliest evidence of air pollution , and their report reveals new information about the extent that carbon emissions accelerate the melting of glaciers. The report, released by the National Institute of Research on Glaciers and Mountain Ecosystems (INAIGEM) in Peru, also indicates that black carbon emissions in particular have a direct impact on the rate at which glaciers melt. Related: Global warming will melt over 1/3 of the Himalayan ice cap by 2100 According to Jesús Gómez López, the Director of Glaciers Research at INAIGEM, “There are different sources of black carbon that can deposit on glaciers, some are wildfires, burning of agricultural waste and the emissions from vehicle fleets. Studies show that the concentration of black carbon is greater in glaciers close to large cities.” The 1,200-year-old Quelccaya Ice Cap contained small traces of lead and mercury believed to be pollution from silver mines during the early Spanish invasion. Climate change and air pollution can often be tied to colonialism and the exploitation of indigenous populations and lands. Metal working and mining by the Incas had “most likely only a local impact on the environment surrounding their mining operations. In contrast, the mining … activities performed by the Spanish had an impact on the atmosphere of the entire South America continent,” said Paolo Gabrielli, a researcher from Ohio State who contributed to the first paper on the discovery. Although the age of the pollution is impressive, researchers are quick to point out that all glaciers contain human-caused pollution at this point. “Today, there are no glaciers on Earth where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic origin cannot be detected,” said a report from Ohio State University. Researchers also suggest that emissions from fires, transportation and industry should be curtailed in order to reduce glacial melt and trap carbon in place. They also note that while air pollution is hundreds of years old, today’s level of air pollution is unprecedented. Via UN Environment Images via Cassie Matias

Read more:
Earliest human air pollution detected in glaciers

Adidas continues drive toward sustainable manufacturing with FUTURECRAFT.LOOP performance shoe

May 6, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Adidas continues drive toward sustainable manufacturing with FUTURECRAFT.LOOP performance shoe

It’s not everyday a household name brand in the performance footwear industry announces a 100 percent recyclable shoe, fortunately for conscientious consumers and the planet, adidas has developed the FUTURECRAFT.LOOP performance running shoe, designed to tackle the daily pavement beatings like other shoes across the brand. However, the difference is that instead of heading to landfills with hundreds of thousands of other shoes, the FUTURECRAFT.LOOP can be returned to Adidas where it is broken down and reused to create new performance running shoes. “Taking plastic waste out of the system is the first step, but we can’t stop there,” said Eric Liedtke, Executive Board Member at Adidas, responsible for Global Brands. “What happens to your shoes after you’ve worn them out? You throw them away – except there is no away. There are only landfills and incinerators and ultimately an atmosphere choked with excess carbon , or oceans filled with plastic waste . The next step is to end the concept of “waste” entirely. Our dream is that you can keep wearing the same shoes over and over again.” Related: These sneakers are painted with cast-off blood from slaughterhouses The process was developed after nearly a decade of research and development focused on changing age-old performance-shoe manufacturing practices. The end goal was to create a shoe that was not only sourced from recycled materials, but was also able to be turned back into another pair, creating a full-loop of manufacturing responsibility. The process involves zero waste . This dive into sustainable footwear isn’t new territory for the company who partnered with Parley for the Oceans, in 2015 to introduce a footwear concept with an upper made entirely of yarns and filaments that were reclaimed and recycled from plastic waste and illegal deep-sea gillnets in the ocean. Adidas has made recycling materials a common business practice. In 2019, they plan to manufacture 11 million shoes that contain recycled plastic collected from beaches on remote islands and coastal communities. In fact, the company has looked to the future for some time and is currently working towards a goal of using only recycled polyester for every possible application by 2024. Under a current beta program, Adidas is sending shoes to participants in several major markets who will use the shoes and provide feedback. The company will use that feedback to create the final version of the FUTURECRAFT.LOOP, due to hit the market in 2021. “FUTURECRAFT.LOOP is our first running shoe that is made to be remade. It is a statement of our intent to take responsibility for the entire life of our product; proof that we can build high-performance running shoes that you don’t have to throw away,” said Eric Liedtke. + Adidas Images via Adidas

Here is the original: 
Adidas continues drive toward sustainable manufacturing with FUTURECRAFT.LOOP performance shoe

One-of-a-kind Wilhelm Lamp is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate

April 12, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on One-of-a-kind Wilhelm Lamp is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate

Challenged by Milanese design gallerist Rossana Orlandi to “give plastic a second life,” Italian architect Tiziano Vudafieri has created the Wilhelm Lamp, a unique light fixture and tribute to the renowned German industrial designer Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Presented at Rossana Orlandi’s exhibition Guitlessplastic – Master’s Pieces during Milan Design Week, the Wilhelm Lamp reinterprets the Wagenfeld’s modernist glass vase as an enlarged pendant lamp that is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate. First launched last year, Rossana Orlandi’s Guitlessplastic project was created to challenge the public discourse around plastic. The initiative has included talks and numerous collaborations between brands, artists and architects invited to showcase responsible uses of plastic through recycling. The Guitlessplastic – Master’s Pieces collection exhibits unique works made out of recycled and recyclable plastic by renowned artists, designers and architects and is currently on show at the Railway Pavilion of the Museum Scienza e Tecnologia Leonardo da Vinci in Milan until April 14. As an admirer of Wilhelm Wagenfeld, Tiziano Vudafieri owns a 1935 Wagenfield glass vase as part of his personal collection and used it as the inspiration for the Wilhelm Lamp. Created in collaboration with BAOLAB, LATI and GIMAC, the lamp was 3D-printed into a large, bulbous shape from recycled polycarbonate , a material that boasts high thermal and mechanical resistance. At the exhibition, the translucent pendant lamp is suspended above the 1935 Wagenfeld vase, which is bathed in the lamp’s light. Related: Make your own custom sunglasses from recycled plastic with FOS “Wilhelm Wagenfeld was the only Bauhaus master to apply this movement’s utopia to real life, invading the market after World War II with beautiful everyday objects with innovative designs and affordable prices,” Vudafieri said. “Among his works, I prefer his glass pieces, particularly the vases, with their classic and rigorous, elegant and modern forms. Hence the idea of recycling not only the materials used for the object, but also the design itself, fitting in perfectly with the Guiltless Plastic theme.” + Tiziano Vudafieri Images via Tiziano Vudafieri

Read the original here: 
One-of-a-kind Wilhelm Lamp is 3D-printed from recycled polycarbonate

Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

December 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

A former brownfield has been transformed into the remediated site for ECO-TUBES, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshop Building that boasts sustainable construction materials and energy-efficient systems. Designed by architect Joseph Cory of the Israeli architecture studio Geotectura Studio , the recently completed building was developed as part of the planned renovation of Shenkar College’s campus in Ramat Gan, Israel and features recycled and local materials along with non-toxic finishes. Selected as the winner of a competition, the Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building (ECO-TUBES) design was favored over other proposals due to its ability to be implemented in phases without disrupting student activity. Installed in two phases, the 6,600-square-meter Azriel Faculty of Design’s Workshops Building houses several workshop rooms—among them woodworking, metalworking, painting, foam manipulation and more—in addition to classrooms , offices, gallery spaces and the Gottesman Department of Jewelry Design. The building has also been engineered to allow for future growth through the addition of extra floors. In a nod to the city’s heritage as a major citrus producer, the landscaping features a variety of citrus trees (including orange, pomelo, lime, pomelit and grapefruit) to mimic an urban orchard. The roof has also been transformed into a mini orchard with container plants. The abundance of greenery, along with the vertical louvers, made from bamboo fiber and recycled plastic, helps to combat the urban heat island effect and create a pleasant microclimate. Related: Energy-plus home is a beacon of sustainability in Tel Aviv Designed with Buidling Information Modeling (BIM) to optimize energy efficiency , the U-Glass-clad building was constructed with a compact, well-insulated envelope and follows passive solar principles. “The conception of a compact shape led to minimal use of material, while maximizing natural light until late afternoon,” explains Geotectura Studio. “The building’s unique shape is based on polygonal segments with ecological glass and excellent insulation along the sides. The polygons extend the length of the southern façade, making it possible to place more workshop tools that require optimal natural light. The arched design creates optimization of maximal workstations receiving natural soft lighting.” + Geotectura Studio Images by Lior Avitan

View post:
Geotectura Studio completes an ecological building on a former brownfield in Israel

Dutch couple to drive a solar-powered, 3D-printed vehicle to the South Pole

October 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Dutch couple to drive a solar-powered, 3D-printed vehicle to the South Pole

In a bid to promote zero-waste lifestyles, Edwin and Liesbeth ter Velde of Clean2Antarctica will soon embark on a thrilling adventure to one of the coldest places on Earth — Antarctica. The Dutch couple will drive from their base camp on the southernmost continent to the South Pole in a solar-powered vehicle — called the Solar Voyager — built from upcycled, 3D-printed plastic components. The expedition is expected to take 30 days and will kick off in less than a month on Nov. 28, 2018. Weighing in at 1,485 kilograms with a length of 16 meters, the Solar Voyager was mainly built from specially engineered,  3D-printed hexagonal blocks, called HexCores, made from industrially recycled PET filament that lock together into a honeycomb-like structure. Forty 3D printers were used to transform approximately 200 kilograms of plastic into the chassis of the Solar Voyager, which is held together with 3D-printed knobs that can withstand below freezing temperatures. The vehicle consists of a cab large enough for two people and two trailers on eight netted tires. Mounted on the trailers are 10 bifacial solar panels with 325-Watt peak for powering the Solar Voyager’s engine. Each panel measures nearly 19 square feet and weighs about 25 kilograms. In case of emergencies, the vehicle will be equipped with two 60-kilogram batteries with a total power of 10 kWh. The couple has also included infrared windows for absorbing sunlight and vacuum solar tubes that melt snow. Related: The world’s largest wildlife sanctuary proposed for Antarctica “If driving to the South Pole on solar power was our ultimate goal, we would still be proud of our mission because no one has ever done it before and the technology we developed can become a prototype for Antarctic research drones,” the couple said. “However, it’s not about technology but about starting experiments and discovering what’s possible with waste. To reach a circular society, we need to start doing things differently. Our expedition is an example how far you can get when you simply start doing things differently instead of talking about abstract solutions.” The expedition is expected to begin November 28 starting from Union Glacier, Antarctica. The Solar Voyager will be followed by a support group of three people for filming purposes. + Clean2Antarctica Images via Clean2Antarctica

See more here: 
Dutch couple to drive a solar-powered, 3D-printed vehicle to the South Pole

France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

Take that, plastic! France has announced that it plans to make bottles made with recycled plastic less expensive than those made from new plastic, part of a larger plan to intensify regulations on plastic use. Other aspects of the plan include increasing taxes on landfill and lowering the value-added tax on recycling activities. Related: Coca-Cola rewards recycling in the UK with half-priced theme park tickets According to Junior Environment Minister Brune Poirson, the French government will introduce further specific measures to address the problem of plastic pollution . “We need to transform the French economy,” she said. “We are launching a movement that will be scrutinized and followed by our European partners.” Part of this movement is a plan to reduce the price of products packaged in recycled containers by up to 10 percent. The discount-premium system encourages its consumers to recycle by making sustainability the more affordable option. “Tomorrow, when there is a choice between two bottles, one made with recycled plastic, the other not, the first one will be cheaper,” Poiron stated. Related: Dominica makes historic pledge to combat plastic pollution Currently, France has the second-worst recycling rate in Europe, with just 25.5 percent of its plastic packaging waste recycled. By comparison, Germany and the Netherlands recycle about 50 percent of their plastic waste. Nevertheless, the French government plans to change its plastic recycling rate to 100% by the year 2025, with the recent announcement marking the first steps toward this goal. Veolia and Suez, recycling powerhouses in the French market, have long been calling for the regulation changes, which would provide a boost for business. Retailers have also joined the cause; for example, French company E.Leclerc has pledged to eliminate the sale of throwaway plastics and replace them with more eco-friendly alternatives, such as bamboo , and is testing a loyalty point system for customers who deposit plastic and glass bottles in some store outlets. + Eurostat + Le Journal de Dimanche Via Reuters

Original post: 
France plans to make recycled plastic bottles less expensive

Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

August 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

Agrochemical company Monsanto has been ordered to pay $289 million to school groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson, who said the Bayer subsidiary’s chemical products gave him cancer. On Friday, a California jury ruled that the company acted with knowledge that risks of cancer were possible when allowing their weedkillers, such as Roundup , to remain on the market with no hazard warnings. The $289 million sum consists of $39 million in compensatory damages with the remaining $250 million accorded for punitive damages. The three-day trial in the Superior Court of California in San Francisco concluded with the determination that Monsanto did not warn consumers like Johnson of the dangers associated to glyphosate exposure. The 46-year-old’s case was filed in 2016, but it was rushed to trial as a result of the acuteness of his cancer. Doctors predicted that Johnson, a pest control manager for a California county school system, would not live past 2020 because of the non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma he developed while being on the job. Related: California man files lawsuit against Monsanto for allegedly hiding dangers of glyphosate Johnson regularly used popular Monsanto products Roundup and Ranger Pro, both herbicides containing glyphosate , a chemical that poses cancer risks to humans. Monsanto plans to appeal the verdict and cited 800 scientific studies and reviews in its support of the weedkillers. The company said, “Glyphosate does not cause cancer and did not cause Mr. Johnson’s cancer.” Monsanto was recently acquired for $62.5 billion by the German conglomerate Bayer, which is now faced with more than 5,000 lawsuits across the U.S. that resemble Mr. Johnson’s case. Related: Court orders EPA to ban pesticide that causes learning disabilities in children Jurors on the trial were privy to never-before-seen internal company documents “proving that Monsanto has known for decades that glyphosate, and specifically Roundup, could cause cancer,” Brent Wisner, Johnson’s lawyer, revealed in a statement. Wisner’s demand to the company was simple — “Put consumer safety first over profits.” Via The New York Times Image via Global Justice Now

Original post:
Court orders Monsanto to pay $289 million in cancer trial

A company in Ghana is turning plastic bags into roads

April 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A company in Ghana is turning plastic bags into roads

Only two percent of plastic trash in Ghana is recycled , according to a video from the World Economic Forum (WEF) – but one local company is hoping to change that statistic. Nelplast Ghana Limited , which focuses on industrial processing, is turning plastic bags into pavement blocks that can be used to build roads. And it’s not just plastic bags than can be utilized, but just about any kind of plastic garbage. On the road to a cleaner environment. Learn more: https://t.co/5ioC4M7lsc pic.twitter.com/yioef3AK5j — World Economic Forum (@wef) March 29, 2018 Thanks to Nelplast, plastic bags can now have a new life as part of a road. Nelplast shreds the bags and mixes them with sand to create what WEF describes as “a new form of asphalt .” This asphalt requires fewer natural resources to create, lasts a long time, and is resilient to boot. And it’s not just plastic bags that can be utilized, but just about any kind of plastic garbage . Related: UK tests cheaper, longer-lasting roads made with recycled plastic Network engineer Nelson Boateng is behind Nelplast; online publication Konbini said he developed the asphalt, which is comprised of 60 percent plastic and 40 percent sand. He created his own recycling machine using scrap metal  and started the company to recycle around 4,400 pounds of plastic junk. The Nelplast website says Boateng possesses “over 20 years of experience in the recycling industry.” WEF’s video said Ghana’s Ministry of Environment already has the paving blocks in one district, and it wants to help Nelplast scale up. In addition to helping clean up the environment , Boateng has created jobs; the company directly and indirectly employs over 230 people. ? Nelplast aims “to seek the interest of the environment first in all [their] processes.” For example, the company also sells plastic roofing tiles and offers consulting in launching recycling companies. Their objectives include recycling “about 70 percent of plastics waste generated by the country daily into useful products that can be used for a lifetime.” + Nelplast Ghana Limited Via World Economic Forum on Twitter and Konbini Image via Depositphotos

Read more from the original source: 
A company in Ghana is turning plastic bags into roads

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 2446 access attempts in the last 7 days.