Calm Booth is a soundproof office retreat made out of recycled plastic bottles

October 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Calm Booth is a soundproof office retreat made out of recycled plastic bottles

The stresses of work often make us want to crawl under our desks. Now, one innovative firm is providing offices with a designated place to tune out the noise and find inner peace. Designed by New York-based firm ROOM , the Calm Booth, which is made out of 1,088 recycled plastic bottles , was created for companies that want to provide their employees with a space to enjoy a moment of peace while working. According to the designers, the inspiration for the Calm Booth came from the common difficulty that workers face when wanting to find a moment of  peace during a long, hectic workday. The booth is designed to be a place where “meditation meets privacy,” allowing workers to enjoy a respite to relax and refocus during the day. Related: Upcycled plastic bottles are used to create this durable emergency shelter ROOM has long been known for its soundproof booths that are designed to create private spaces for office use . But this time around, it is partnering with a meditation app, called Calm, to create a soothing space that has an extensive library of meditation soundtracks, from nature soundscapes to music to “nap stories.” The Calm Booth is a simple structure clad in a crisp, white facade with a frosted, acrylic privacy door. The booth is made soundproof thanks to three layers of insulation made with more than 1,000 recycled plastic bottles . On the interior, the space is minimalist with a simple, green forest print on the walls. The booth also comes with a small shelf, a built-in Ethernet port, soft motion-enabled LED lighting and a ventilation system. According to the American Institute of Stress , work-related stress accounts for high absenteeism in offices around the country. Hopefully, companies will begin to take notice that providing a place for workers to practice mindfulness within the office is both beneficial to employees as well as the bottom line. Creating that space with recycled materials is better for the planet, too. + ROOM Architects Images via ROOM Architects

Read the original post: 
Calm Booth is a soundproof office retreat made out of recycled plastic bottles

When in Rome, recycle more to earn free metro and bus travel tickets

October 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on When in Rome, recycle more to earn free metro and bus travel tickets

Rome’s Mayor Virginia Raggi recently unveiled an eco-friendly pilot initiative that is gaining popularity in the Eternal City. Called “Ricicli + Viaggi” (or the “Recycle + Travel” program), consumers who recycle empty plastic bottles earn credits toward free public transportation travel tickets. How does it work? Commuters who recycle empty plastic bottles via a designated compactor will then earn accrued credit-points, redeemable as free digital travel tickets. For a standard ticket, one must recycle 30 empty plastic bottles. That same standard ticket, which is good for one metro ride or 100 minutes on a Roman bus, costs about 1.50 euros. Related: Indonesia accepts plastic bottles in exchange for free bus rides The environmentally friendly campaign is widely appealing for good reasons. Empty plastic bottles no longer have to accumulate on Roman streets, and the travel tickets awarded are digital rather than paper. In other words, litter is minimized. Many Romans approve of this new way to save cash, and it couldn’t come at a more critical time. A 2017 study, conducted by consultancy group Expert Market, found that Italy ranked fourth among The Most Wasteful European Countries. The Eternal City has gained notoriety for its dysfunctional waste management. With only three major landfills — one that shut down in 2013 and the other two ravaged by frequent fires — Rome has since been spiraling into decline with refuse spewing all over the streets after years of neglect. Both tourists and residents have long complained about the garbage littering ancient monuments, the burgeoning vermin infestations and the lack of sanitation strategy as successive mayors from different parties have struggled unsuccessfully to resolve the Italian capital’s waste crisis. Prior to the trash-for-tickets program, recycling was patchy and very inefficient. “The situation has been quite disastrous,” president of environmental group Legambiente Stefano Ciafani said. “Rome has failed to create an efficient system for differentiated waste collection, as Milan has done, and it has not built the recycling plants that are fundamental for a city where three million people live.” But there has been a ray of hope ever since Raggi entered office in 2016 as the first female mayor in Roman history. While Raggi has had a stormy start battling deeply entrenched ways, this new pilot initiative of swapping plastic for transit credits is a step in a more positive, eco-friendly direction. Of course, with Ricicli + Viaggi still in its infancy, there are at present only three public transportation metro stations in Rome offering the recycling compactor machines. Despite that, more than 350,000 bottles have been recycled so far, and it is hoped the numbers will continue to rise. Raggi happily shared, “We are the first major European capital to present this innovation.” The Eternal City’s roll-out follows at the heels of similar programs already in place in both Beijing and Istanbul. + Ricicli + Viaggi Via BBC and Phys.org Image via Juan Enrique Gilardi

Here is the original post:
When in Rome, recycle more to earn free metro and bus travel tickets

VEJA unveils vegan sneakers made from corn waste

February 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on VEJA unveils vegan sneakers made from corn waste

Ethical sneaker brand VEJA has unveiled its newest and arguably most impressive eco-friendly kicks yet — the Campo, a chic sneaker made with a new vegan and biodegradable fabric. The revolutionary material, called C.W.L., is made from a waxed canvas with 50 percent corn waste from the food industry. The Campo marks the first time C.W.L. has been used in the fashion industry. Developed by an Italian company, C.W.L. is organic cotton coated with PU and resin from the corn waste industry. With a look and touch comparable to leather, the bio-sourced material is VEJA’s ecological substitute for leather. “Since we started VEJA in 2005, we are always looking for new sustainable and more ecological raw materials,” VEJA said in a press release. “After five years of R&D and many failures to find an ecological substitute for leather, we finally found a revolutionary fabric.” The Campo, which is available in a variety of colors, uses C.W.L. for the upper and panels, recycled polyester — a B-Mesh (bottle-mesh) fabric created from recycled plastic bottles  — for the jersey lining and wild rubber sustainably sourced from the Amazonian forest for the insole and sole. As with all of VEJA’s shoes, the Campo sneakers are ethically made in Brazil in the region of Porto Alegre. Related: nat-2 creates a completely vegan sneaker made from coffee Launched this year, the new Campo model is an alternative to VEJA’s leather models. Forty percent of VEJA models are vegan for its spring/summer 2019 collection, which also includes the alternative-leather models Rio Branco and Nova. The Campo sneakers are now available for purchase online in six different varieties and start at 125 euros. + VEJA Images by Mario Simon Lafleur via VEJA

Original post: 
VEJA unveils vegan sneakers made from corn waste

This hand-built island is the start of Copenhagens parkipelago of floating public spaces

March 14, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This hand-built island is the start of Copenhagens parkipelago of floating public spaces

A tiny wooden island floating in Copenhagen harbor is bringing life and interest back to the city’s waters. Australian architect Marshall Blecher and Magnus Maarbjerg of Danish design studio Fokstrot designed CPH-Ø1, an experimental floating island park buoyed by recycled plastic bottles that could bring about more floating public spaces all along the city’s waters. Created as a prototype for the Copenhagen Islands project, the 215-square-foot timber island is punctuated by a single linden tree and is temporarily located in Sluseløbet. Launched last year with support by Kulturhavn365, CPH-Ø1 first served as a resting area for adventurous Copenhageners who are invited to moor alongside the island by boat or kayak. The public space also doubles as a small events venue and, according to Dezeen , will host a lecture series next month about the future of harbor cities. CPH-Ø1 was constructed by hand in Copenhagen’s boat building yards using traditional wooden boat building techniques with locally and sustainably sourced materials. Related: Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmark’s most energy-efficient laboratories CPH-Ø1 is the first in what the designers hope will be a ‘parkipelago’ of nine islands that offer creative public spaces in the harbor, particularly in forgotten and unused areas. Future iterations may include a floating sauna island, floating mussel farms, floating gardens, and even a floating sail-in cafe—all of which will be open to the public. The islands can be connected together or float separately. + Copenhagen Islands Via Dezeen Images via Fokstrot

Read the rest here:
This hand-built island is the start of Copenhagens parkipelago of floating public spaces

Thousands of plastic bottles transformed into an inspiring tower of hope in South Africa

July 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Thousands of plastic bottles transformed into an inspiring tower of hope in South Africa

A million plastic bottles are purchased worldwide every minute, with annual consumption set to top half a trillion by 2021 . In a bid to bring awareness to the problem of plastic bottle use and pollution, artist r1 led a project to transform over 7,000 plastic bottles into an incredible sight to behold: a 20-meter-tall permanent art sculpture. Created in collaboration with the local community, the environmental art piece, called the iThemba Tower, symbolizes hope and inspiration in Troyeville, Johannesburg. Artist r1 used a redundant communications tower as the base of the iThemba Tower, which derives its name from the isiZulu word that means trust or hope. The diverse local community was involved in all aspects of the design process, from plastic bottle collection to construction. Locals were also invited to fill each bottle with a “message of hope,” thus creating a symbolic communications tower that “broadcasts” the community’s diverse hopes and dreams. Related: 1,000 recycled CDs transform an abandoned farmhouse into a shimmering work of art “It is estimated that in South Africa alone, nearly over 250,000 plastic bottles are dumped into our environment every hour,” says the narrator in a video about the iThemba Tower. “One plastic bottle will take up to 700 years to completely break down in a landfill. The iThemba Tower project raised awareness the importance of recycling through workshops and various community activities.” LEDs were also inserted inside the bottles to turn them into “lights of hope.” The lights bring the tower alive at night and create a magical twinkling effect. The iThemba Tower is a permanent art piece at the Spaza Art Garden, a safe haven for creatives in Johannesburg. + r1

Original post:
Thousands of plastic bottles transformed into an inspiring tower of hope in South Africa

Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

Plastic bottle architecture is fantastic at turning a problem into an eco-friendly opportunity. The amazing EcoARK in Taipei , Taiwan is one such example. Built from 1.5 million recycled plastic bottles, this massive pavilion is surprisingly strong enough to withstand the forces of nature—including fires and earthquakes! Designed by architect Arthur Huang, the nine-story $3 million USD pavilion is powered by solar energy and was built to the mantra of “Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.” Constructed for use as an exhibition hall during the 2010 Taipei International Flora Expo, the EcoARK pavilion continues to spread its message of sustainability for seven years strong. Though Taiwan is home to one of the world’s most respected recycling programs, the country consumes a whopping 4.5 million PET bottles a year. To spread awareness about plastic waste, the Far Eastern Group , one of the world’s largest producers of PET products, commissioned architect and Miniwiz founder Arthur Huang to design and build the eco-friendly EcoARK. As the world’s first building of its kind, EcoARK is an incredible architectural feat. The key to the EcoARK design lay with polli-bricks, a hollow building block made of recycled PET developed by Miniwiz. The polli-bricks were manufactured from over a million recycled plastic bottles melted down into PET pellets and re-engineered into a new bottle-like shape. The blow-molded polli-bricks feature interlocking grooves that fit tightly together like LEGOs and only require a small amount of silicon sealant. Once assembled into flat rectangular panels, the polli-bricks are coated with a fire- and water-resistant film. The EcoARK’s curved and transparent facade is made up of these modular panels screwed and mounted onto a structural steel frame. Although the EcoARK weighs half as much as conventional buildings, it’s resistant to earthquakes and typhoons, and can withstand sustained winds up of to 130 kilometers per hour. Related: Basurama transforms landfill trash into playgrounds in Taipei Use of recycled plastic bottles isn’t the only eco-friendly feature of the EcoARK. The pavilion was built with low-carbon building techniques to maintain a zero-carbon footprint during operation. The building stays cool without air conditioning thanks to natural ventilation. The air inside the polli-bricks also provides insulation from heat and rainwater is collected and reused to cool the building. The polli-bricks’ transparency allows natural light to illuminate the interior during the day. Solar – and wind-powered systems generate the electricity needed to power 40,000 LEDs that light the building up at night. + Miniwiz Images © Lucy Wang

Original post: 
Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

The prefab house of the future is made from recycled, reusable, and sustainable materials

May 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The prefab house of the future is made from recycled, reusable, and sustainable materials

This prefab home by Arup Associates is made from recycled, reusable and sustainably sourced materials . The Circular Economy Building was designed as a prototype for this year’s London Design Festival and built in only two weeks. The project revisits the archetypal house and reinvents it with refined prefab construction techniques and sustainable materials. The prefab clearly show its Circular Economy elements by revealing them visually– visitors can observe the layers of the envelope – including the demountable SIPS panels and the structural steel frame , which creates enables extension and future adaptation. The design aims to demonstrate that flexible, sustainable architecture can be highly compatible with a comfortable modern lifestyle. Related: Arup’s timber prefab Sky Believe in Better Building wins the 2014 Wood in Architecture Award The architects worked closely with Arup’s engineers to marry pleasant spatial solutions with sustainable building techniques. This informed the choice of finishes and fittings throughout the interior. Even the carpets, supplied by Desso on a take-back scheme, can be replaced when worn out and sustainably refurbished and reused . Related: London’s new Design Museum opens this week inside a renovated post-war modernist building The building’s superior acoustic performance is ensured by using an acoustic wall system built entirely from recycled plastic bottles . A high-tech automation system uses sensors to monitor the interior environment and adjust the skylights , blinds and lights. The building’s flat-pack construction utilizes custom-made panels standardized through several computational iterations. + Arup Associates Via v2com Photos by Simon Kennedy

Original post: 
The prefab house of the future is made from recycled, reusable, and sustainable materials

Luminous floating rings in London are made from 13,000 recycled plastic bottles

February 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Luminous floating rings in London are made from 13,000 recycled plastic bottles

Read the rest of Luminous floating rings in London are made from 13,000 recycled plastic bottles

More:
Luminous floating rings in London are made from 13,000 recycled plastic bottles

INTERVIEW: Black Eyed Peas’ Will.i.am Tells Us Why Green Fashion is the Future

October 1, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on INTERVIEW: Black Eyed Peas’ Will.i.am Tells Us Why Green Fashion is the Future

Green fashion already has a strong group of loyal followers, but how do we get the word out to a larger audience? We recently caught up with multi-platinum recording artist Will.i.am to see how he is using his influence and fashion expertise (did you know that he attended the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in Los Angeles before becoming a Black Eyed Pea?) to spread knowledge about the importance of sustainable fashion to the masses . READ MORE >

See more here:
INTERVIEW: Black Eyed Peas’ Will.i.am Tells Us Why Green Fashion is the Future

“YES IN MY BACK YARD!” garden made from reused plastic bottles challenges throw-away culture

April 27, 2015 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on “YES IN MY BACK YARD!” garden made from reused plastic bottles challenges throw-away culture

Read the rest of “YES IN MY BACK YARD!” garden made from reused plastic bottles challenges throw-away culture Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: art installation , environmental impact , green art , Italian artists , plastic flowers , plastic waste , recycled plastic bottles , recycled plastics , Scartell , YES IN MY BACKYARD

Read the original: 
“YES IN MY BACK YARD!” garden made from reused plastic bottles challenges throw-away culture

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1836 access attempts in the last 7 days.