Khawarizm Studio showcases unique 3D printed vase and lamp

September 15, 2021 by  
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In 2020, Khawarizm Studio’s 3D-printed smart lamp “The Future Catcher” (also known as LouLou, after the Arabic word for “pearls”) placed third in the 2020 3D Printed Luminaire Design Competition and was exhibited at Dubai Design Week. The light fixture design was a reference to Arabian wind catchers and meant to boost awareness of 3D printing in lighting and interior design . Now, designer Muhammad Khalid has revealed another futuristic 3D printed project, this time inspired by the Arabic word for “whirling,” referring to a form of physically active meditation that originated among Sufi groups. The new design, Tawwaf, is modeled after the whirling movements and classic Egyptian Tannura fabric. Featuring both a vase and lamp made from  recycled materials , the collection reflects a flowing pattern with bright, neon colors of orange, blue, pink and red. Related: Award-winning, 3D-printed smart lamp references Arabian wind catchers “We decided to implement computational design tools in our design aiming for a fluid form influenced by Whirling spirituality and Egyptian Tannura fabric behavior, through differential growth simulation starting from a circle to differentiated fluid curve,” explained the designer. “Whirling has been seen as a symbolic imitation of planets in the Solar System orbiting the sun, which led us to a serious question about producing “Tawwaf” on another planet in the future, as an answer we decided to use 3D Printing as production technology and Recycled PLA Filaments as a printing material aiming for possible opportunities in the future to spread  Egyptian  designs in the SPACE.” The lamp design uses smart  LED lighting  technology at its core, complete with multiple lighting modes and colors to reflect different styles and decor. Among the Tawwaf and the LouLou collections, the designer has also produced another vase concept called “Ward” (or the Arabic word for “flowers”) inspired by the Egyptian lotus flower as a symbol of purity, enlightenment and self-regeneration. + Khawarizm Studio Images courtesy of Khawarizm Studio

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Khawarizm Studio showcases unique 3D printed vase and lamp

Surprise wasps and bacterium complicate butterfly study

September 15, 2021 by  
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The introduction of new species to other territories could have unforeseen consequences. According to a study published in  Molecular Ecology , introducing new species to an area could bring along other organisms and pathogens. One such case dates back three decades when caterpillars of the Glanville fritillary (Melitaea cinxia) butterfly were introduced to the tiny island of Sottunga in the Åland archipelago. Scientists hoped that introducing the butterflies would foster an understanding of how they spread. What the scientists did not realize is that they were introducing at least three other species. Related: Season’s first ‘murder hornet’ nest destroyed in Washington It was later discovered that some of the caterpillars contained a parasitic wasp known as Hyposoter horticola. This wasp usually hides inside the caterpillar and bursts out before it can become a butterfly. But that’s not all. Inside the wasps were tinier, rarer “hyperparasitoid” wasps, known as Mesochorus cf. stigmaticus. The hyperparasitoid wasps kill the original wasps shortly after the wasps kill the caterpillar. The study’s lead author, Dr. Anne Duplouy of the University of Helsinki, says that scientists must learn more about species before introducing them to new territories. “The reintroduction of endangered species comes from the heart, a good place, but we have a lot to learn about the species we are reintroducing and the habitat where we want to reintroduce them before we do so,” said Duplouy. One additional visitor, the bacterium Wolbachia pipientis, came along with the wasps. Despite these surprising developments, each species continues to survive on the island. Since the butterflies were introduced along with the accidental parasites , they have spread further to other islands. The wasps are parasites and have consequently affected the other species of butterflies that existed on these islands. According to Duplouy, when such species are introduced, they crash over time and may not last long. However, with the Glanville fritillary, the case has been different.  “The Glanville fritillary population has had amazing crashes at times over the last 30 years and we were expecting there to be very low genetic diversity in the years following those crashes,” Duplouy said. “But this butterfly somehow seems to recover from isolated population crashes, and the genetic diversity in Åland is still impressively high, despite all the bottlenecks the butterfly has been through,” she added. These results could serve as a warning for future studies exploring the possibility of introducing new species. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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Surprise wasps and bacterium complicate butterfly study

There were 227 environmental defenders killed in 2020

September 15, 2021 by  
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As if it’s not bad enough that the world is suffering from  weather  extremes and other climate-related disasters, last year a record 227 environmental defenders died for protecting the planet, according to an  annual report by Global Witness . The report, which was released Monday, says that the number of murdered land defenders has more than doubled since 2013. “It’s the communities that are most impacted by the  climate  crisis who are speaking up to protect their land, their communities and our planet,” said Julie Anne Miranda-Brobeck, head of U.S. communications and global partnerships for Global Witness, as reported by EcoWatch. “It’s those environmental and land defenders who are especially vulnerable to killings and attacks.” Since the counts are based on publicly available data, the true number of fatalities may be underestimated. Related: Indigenous land defender Félix Vásquez murdered in Honduras Global Witness began publishing its annual report in 2012. Since then, the number of fallen environmental or land defenders has increased every year but one. According to the  U.N. Environment Programme  definition, environmental human rights defenders are “individuals and groups who, in their personal or professional capacity and in a peaceful manner, strive to protect and promote human rights relating to the environment, including  water , air, land, flora and fauna.” The report found that like climate change, violence against land defenders disproportionately impacts the Global South.  Colombia  (65 murders), Mexico (30 murders) and the Philippines (29 murders) were the most dangerous countries for those defending land. Latin America was especially deadly, while Africa’s fatalities more than doubled since the previous study, from 7 to 18. A killing in Canada was the only land defender murder recorded last year in the Global North. More than 71% of the land defenders killed in 2020 died defending forests. Other extractive industries, such as mining, large hydroelectric projects and agribusiness, were also deadly. The study authors noted that government inaction contributed to the deaths and that governments used the pandemic to limit protesting and free press rights. In 2020, 158 countries imposed new restrictions along these lines. Via EcoWatch Lead image via Fabrice Florin

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There were 227 environmental defenders killed in 2020

For Purpose Recycling debuts recycled ocean plastic utility belt

July 12, 2021 by  
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Aiming to put an end to ocean plastics while creating income opportunities for those who collect it, Australia-based company For Purpose Recycling is launching a unisex utility belt made of recycled ocean plastic collected from beaches of Indonesia . Each belt funds the prevention of 10 kilograms worth of plastic waste from entering the ocean (the equivalent of 50,000 single-use plastic bags), all while improving the lives of local community members. How does the business model work? The company builds cost-effective waste collection points within Indonesian coastal communities that lack access to basic waste services, giving locals the opportunity to sell the plastic waste they collect for a profit. What’s more, For Purpose Recycling also funds waste and environmental education programs with local institutions to create community outreach and empower community members. The company follows a circular model by reintroducing the recovered ocean-bound plastic waste into new, sustainable products: fashionable and functional utility belts. Related: A vision for an island made of plastic waste in the ocean According to For Purpose Recycling, although 39% of the total plastic waste in Indonesian cities is collected, only about 16% is collected in rural and remote areas. The company’s network of waste collection centers allows locals to exchange plastic waste for things like cash, school tuition and health insurance, adding a lucrative incentive to collect recyclable waste. It is increasing the recycling capacity in the areas as well by building more recycling infrastructure (in 2017, just 10% of the plastic generated in Indonesia was recycled). The For Purpose Recycling utility belts cost $46 (USD) each and come in four colors: Komodo Black, Jeruk Orange, Subak Green and Lolo Blue. Fully adjustable, minimal and fashioned from recycled polyester, the belts are made in China in a factory that’s certified as Global Recycled Standard by third-party certifier Textile Exchange. Once the belt has reached the end of its life, consumers can send it back to For Purpose Recycling to be recycled for store credit. For Purpose Recycling partners with local nonprofits with connections to the community to create a long-term impact, an aspect it hopes will help the company achieve its goal of preventing 1 million kilograms of plastic from entering the oceans by 2023. + For Purpose Recycling Images via For Purpose Recycling

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For Purpose Recycling debuts recycled ocean plastic utility belt

Honda and WASP collaborate in 3D printed motorcycle design process

July 9, 2021 by  
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WASP is partnering with HONDA R&D Europe, a global branch of the well-recognized motor company, in a project it hopes will revolutionize the motorcycle industry’s  sustainable design  processes. The new concept is called Additive Manufacturing, and it will be at the forefront of a new 3D-printed motorcycle project that will combine 3D printing with hand-finished design. WASP (which stands for World’s Advanced Saving Project) is an Italy-based company that specializes in designing and producing 3D printers. The company was inspired by the Potter wasp, an insect that uses materials from its surrounding environment to construct its nests. This nest concept is integrated into the design model, as its large-scale 3D printers aim to build houses with natural materials found on site. The Delta Clay line, for example, 3D-printed dense fluid materials and  industrial clays  in large-scale dimensions. Related: Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle According to WASP, the prototyping process implements 3D printing with  hand-finished  work since there are some areas of motorcycle design where the human hand is “irreplaceable.” “Until today, prototyping was carried out manually and then finished by highly qualified technicians who, like modern sculptors, would skillfully define proportions, lines and volumes,” said a representative for the company in a press release. “In this field it is said that: ‘only the touch and reflection of the lights on the piece can guide the development.’” Today, motorcycle designers use industrial clay to bring their designs to life, but this sometimes a time-consuming process since the entire model must be completed by hand. The WASP collaboration with HONDA would change this by utilizing a 3D-printed design model that is finished by hand to safeguard the creative process. The resulting design process would introduce an innovative approach for the  automotive modeling  world that creates less waste and takes less time. The Design Modeling Coordinator at Honda R&D  Europe  has already met with WASP engineers to integrate the Additive Manufacturing 3D printing technology into the creative process of the company’s industrial clay models. Over the coming months, the two companies hope to showcase their results. + WASP Images courtesy of WASP

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Honda and WASP collaborate in 3D printed motorcycle design process

nat-2’s newest sneakers are made of recycled bubble wrap

July 8, 2021 by  
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From nat-2, a German footwear designer immersed in sustainable and eco-friendly design, we meet the vegan recycled bubble wrap sneakers. Yes, bubble wrap. The new vegan recycled bubble wrap sneakers were designed in collaboration with Israeli startup Remeant , and this is the first time the bubble wrap material has been used in shoes. The innovative material not only keeps bubble wrap out of the landfill, but it is 100% vegan and is available in a range of colors. Related: nat-2 creates a completely vegan sneaker made from coffee The inclusion of recycled bubble wrap provides an interesting look and waterproof protection. The lining is made from a signature bioceramic yarn developed and made by nat-2. Real cork , taken from the outside of the tree without damaging it, makes up the insoles, and real rubber is used for the outsoles. Recycled PET is used to make the laces, and the heels consist of miniscule bits of glass. The vegan sneakers feature a low-profile design and are not gender-specific. They are meant to be durable and versatile for a long usable life, and perhaps could be the only pair of shoes you’ll need for days at the beach, at the office or just in the backyard. The company steps outside the lines with nearly every release. Examples in prior lines include shoes made with fungi, algae, coffee, corn, beans, flowers, cannabis, milk, moss, cast-off slaughterhouse blood and many more. Most of the sneakers are handmade and fairly produced via a small family manufacturer in Italy. The company also relies on low-impact packaging like shoeboxes and brochures made from recycled paper as well as wooden hang tags made out of wood from certified sustainable forests. nat-2 explained, “The reason for using many sustainable and eco-friendly materials and techniques is not only the ecological aspect but also a matter of what we consider as ‘good design’. By creating such innovative products and things, we also reach new aesthetics and haptics which have never [been] seen before in fashion , footwear and accessories.” + nat-2 Images via nat-2

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nat-2’s newest sneakers are made of recycled bubble wrap

KAJ Hotel is a one-room boathouse rental that exudes hygge

July 7, 2021 by  
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The Danish idea of hygge brings “a quality of coziness and comfortable conviviality that engenders a feeling of contentment or well-being.” Why wouldn’t you want to have more of that in your life? At KAJ Hotel, you can. Kaj is a traditional Danish name that also means ‘quay’ or ‘wharf’. The name and the association with hygge are appropriate in the rental that is not a hotel or a houseboat but a memorable lodging on the harbor in central Copenhagen, Denmark. It provides a unique visitor experience as a one-room boathouse and tiny home . It even comes with an extra boat. Related: These floating, 3D-printed private offices have no land impact The project came to light when business and life partners Barbara von Haffner and Toke Larsen commissioned architect Karl Smith Meyer to help develop the plan. The couple have their own houseboat, which they used as a prefabrication point for part of the KAJ lodging. With copious inquiries about what it was like living on a houseboat , they decided to give others the experience firsthand. KAJ Hotel technically has no footprint, perched over the edge of the harbor, but it also avoids a heavy carbon footprint with the use of reclaimed materials. The majority of the mini-rental is built using wood, and there was minimal site impact by craning the prefabricated pieces into place.  Window frames were upcycled from the previous Danish Defense Command building. Old railroad poles were used in the foundation, and recycled materials from a ship were used to build the stairs and gangway.  The tiny abode delivers big on interior design with a traditional Danish feel. Known for a modern minimalism vibe, the Scandinavian-style lightly-colored wood ceilings, walls, floors and furniture are complemented by white walls and window frames for a neutral color palette that doesn’t distract from the natural surroundings just steps away. The micro-hotel provides a countertop/desk area, bathroom with portal window, a primary bedroom and additional sleeping spaces all within a 16-square-meter room.  Along the water’s edge, visitors can take in the opportunity for leisurely or quick swimming, sunbathing or enjoying views of the nearby tourist attractions. Unlike a hotel, you’ll have no one sharing the space, yet amenities like the provided porridge, coffee and tea deliver the comforts of home.  + KAJ Hotel Via Wallpaper Images via KAJ Hotel

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The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

July 5, 2021 by  
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This seemingly small, shingle-covered home in Melbourne, Australia may not look like a sustainable powerhouse, but in reality it is generating 100kwh of  energy  per day with a 26kwh Tesla battery. This number stands out compared to the 19kwh of energy the average Australian house uses per day. Known as the Garden House, the modern abode has an impressive set of sustainability features. In addition to its 17kW  solar panels  that face north, east and west to maximize solar output throughout the day, it also boasts a 15,000-liter rainwater tank stored under the garage for use in the toilets and to irrigate the garden. Related: Biophilic dome homes produce more energy than they consume The goal was to create a self-sustaining,  modern  home that didn’t feel big yet could accommodate a family of five. According to the clients, the architects were able to make this dream a reality. “Our home doesn’t feel too huge, it feels homely and cosy,” said the owners. “It’s like a little eco system, the more people the more sense it makes. It’s a multitasking house, doing four things at the same time. There’s logical space for it and it all works.” This was achieved by breaking up the bulk of the house into four smaller zones: an office, a kitchen/living room, a dining area and a kids’ area, each connected through mirrored glass links or bridges. Since the glass reflects its lush surroundings, the result is a cozy space that maintains a cohesive style. According to the designers, the clients wanted to keep as much of the plot’s existing greenery as possible, so they could enjoy the  garden  feel right when they moved in. The home also includes underfloor insulation, hydronic heating and double glazed windows with thermally broken aluminum frames. Such features allow the house to operate without gas or fossil fuels. For materials, the designers opted for  recycled  brick and 50% fly-ash content cement to lower emissions. The home has since won accolades from the Victorian Institute of Architects Awards. Austin Maynard Architects also dubbed the project its “most sustainable house so far.” + Austin Maynard Architects Via Dezeen Images via Austin Maynard Architects

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The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

July 5, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

This seemingly small, shingle-covered home in Melbourne, Australia may not look like a sustainable powerhouse, but in reality it is generating 100kwh of  energy  per day with a 26kwh Tesla battery. This number stands out compared to the 19kwh of energy the average Australian house uses per day. Known as the Garden House, the modern abode has an impressive set of sustainability features. In addition to its 17kW  solar panels  that face north, east and west to maximize solar output throughout the day, it also boasts a 15,000-liter rainwater tank stored under the garage for use in the toilets and to irrigate the garden. Related: Biophilic dome homes produce more energy than they consume The goal was to create a self-sustaining,  modern  home that didn’t feel big yet could accommodate a family of five. According to the clients, the architects were able to make this dream a reality. “Our home doesn’t feel too huge, it feels homely and cosy,” said the owners. “It’s like a little eco system, the more people the more sense it makes. It’s a multitasking house, doing four things at the same time. There’s logical space for it and it all works.” This was achieved by breaking up the bulk of the house into four smaller zones: an office, a kitchen/living room, a dining area and a kids’ area, each connected through mirrored glass links or bridges. Since the glass reflects its lush surroundings, the result is a cozy space that maintains a cohesive style. According to the designers, the clients wanted to keep as much of the plot’s existing greenery as possible, so they could enjoy the  garden  feel right when they moved in. The home also includes underfloor insulation, hydronic heating and double glazed windows with thermally broken aluminum frames. Such features allow the house to operate without gas or fossil fuels. For materials, the designers opted for  recycled  brick and 50% fly-ash content cement to lower emissions. The home has since won accolades from the Victorian Institute of Architects Awards. Austin Maynard Architects also dubbed the project its “most sustainable house so far.” + Austin Maynard Architects Via Dezeen Images via Austin Maynard Architects

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The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

July 5, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

This seemingly small, shingle-covered home in Melbourne, Australia may not look like a sustainable powerhouse, but in reality it is generating 100kwh of  energy  per day with a 26kwh Tesla battery. This number stands out compared to the 19kwh of energy the average Australian house uses per day. Known as the Garden House, the modern abode has an impressive set of sustainability features. In addition to its 17kW  solar panels  that face north, east and west to maximize solar output throughout the day, it also boasts a 15,000-liter rainwater tank stored under the garage for use in the toilets and to irrigate the garden. Related: Biophilic dome homes produce more energy than they consume The goal was to create a self-sustaining,  modern  home that didn’t feel big yet could accommodate a family of five. According to the clients, the architects were able to make this dream a reality. “Our home doesn’t feel too huge, it feels homely and cosy,” said the owners. “It’s like a little eco system, the more people the more sense it makes. It’s a multitasking house, doing four things at the same time. There’s logical space for it and it all works.” This was achieved by breaking up the bulk of the house into four smaller zones: an office, a kitchen/living room, a dining area and a kids’ area, each connected through mirrored glass links or bridges. Since the glass reflects its lush surroundings, the result is a cozy space that maintains a cohesive style. According to the designers, the clients wanted to keep as much of the plot’s existing greenery as possible, so they could enjoy the  garden  feel right when they moved in. The home also includes underfloor insulation, hydronic heating and double glazed windows with thermally broken aluminum frames. Such features allow the house to operate without gas or fossil fuels. For materials, the designers opted for  recycled  brick and 50% fly-ash content cement to lower emissions. The home has since won accolades from the Victorian Institute of Architects Awards. Austin Maynard Architects also dubbed the project its “most sustainable house so far.” + Austin Maynard Architects Via Dezeen Images via Austin Maynard Architects

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The Garden House is built like a renewable power station

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