This floating park in Rotterdam is made from recycled plastic waste

July 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

More than 1,000 square feet of plastic ultimately destined to pollute the ocean is getting a second lease on life in Rotterdam. On July 4, 2018, Recycled Island Foundation opened its prototype to the public: a floating park made entirely from recycled plastic waste and appropriately named the Recycled Park. According to a report commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment , more than 1,000 cubic meters of plastic waste is transported every year down the Meuse River and into the North Sea. The plastics come from landfills, agriculture, sewage and inland shipping. They ultimate reach the river through a number of methods, including dumping, littering and run-off. Instead of letting the plastic reach the ocean, the Recycled Island Foundation and 25 partners created the Recycled Park: a public space in Rotterdam consisting of floating platforms made from recycled plastic waste. The team set traps along the Meuse River that collect waste, which is then gathered and transformed into platforms for the floating park. Related: A massive five-ton plastic waste whale breaches in a Bruges canal The Recycled Park project is focused on the Meuse River because of the overall viability of plastic in the aquatic space. The collected waste  is newer than in other waterways, so it can easily be made into platforms. To create the platforms, the collected plastic is sent to Wageningen University, which leads the research on effective recycling techniques . From there, the platforms are designed with HEBO Mariteimservice , who removes the garbage from the water. But the platforms aren’t just designed to reduce plastic pollution — they also serve as a wildlife habitat. Plants grow both above and below the river surface, allowing greenery to thrive on top of the platforms, providing a habitat capable of sustaining marine life and encouraging fish to lay eggs below the platforms. With the prototype park open, the organization is now looking for expansion options. Its ultimate goal is to incorporate several aquatic platform types into the park, while finding a permanent location to collect plastic from the Dutch harbor . + Recycled Park + Recycled Island Foundation Images via Recycled Island Foundation

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This floating park in Rotterdam is made from recycled plastic waste

Whim Architects Launch Kickstarter Campaign to Build Self-Sustaining Island Homes from Pacific Plastic Garbage

November 15, 2012 by  
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Dutch studio Whim Architects has unveiled plans for a floating, self-sustaining home that would respond to rising sea level —and they hope to construct the island residence from plastic waste currently circling in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The architects are raising funds with a newly launched Kickstarter campaign , and they’re reaching out to plastic recycling experts and professionals to test out their design. Read the rest of Whim Architects Launch Kickstarter Campaign to Build Self-Sustaining Island Homes from Pacific Plastic Garbage Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Floating Houses , kickstarter project , plastic recycling , prototype housing , recycled building material , recycling sea waste , self-sufficient homes , whim architects

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Whim Architects Launch Kickstarter Campaign to Build Self-Sustaining Island Homes from Pacific Plastic Garbage

6 Vegan, Vegetarian and Raw Food Turkey Alternatives for Thanksgiving

November 15, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of 6 Vegan, Vegetarian and Raw Food Turkey Alternatives for Thanksgiving Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Field Roast Grain Meat , Gardein , green holidays , Magic Vegan Loaf Maker , Quorn , Raw diet , raw food thanksgiving , Raw Foods , sustainable food , Tofurky , vegan food , vegan thanksgiving , vegan turkey , vegetarian food , vegetarian holiday , vegetarian thanksgiving , vegetarian turkey , we Like it raw

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6 Vegan, Vegetarian and Raw Food Turkey Alternatives for Thanksgiving

Island In the (Air)Stream: Floating Sculpture Goes Missing

August 10, 2011 by  
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[ By Delana in Art & Design & Nature & Ecosystems & News & Politics . ] If you live in Europe and recently saw a lush green island floating by in the sky, don’t worry – you haven’t lost your mind. A team of U.K. artists and designers have lost something very important to them, though: this mesmerizing floating structure called Is Land. (all images via: Is Land ) At the Secret Garden Party festival in Cambridgeshire in July, a group of vandals cut the support ropes tethering Is Land to the ground. The helium-filled floating island sailed away on the wind, carrying with it months of hard work on the part of artist Sarah Cockings, designer Laurence Symonds and a whole team of other contributors. Is Land, a lushly vegetated artificial island in the sky, is a sculpture that reminds us all how close and how far away our perfect worlds are. It floats above the heads of onlookers, tantalizing them with glimpses of a lovely but ever-unreachable landscape. Sadly, the few malicious festival-goers who decided to set Is Land aloft nearly deprived an American audience of this beautiful sculpture. It was due to make its first American appearance at Burning Man 2011 shortly after the Secret Garden Party. Thanks to the generosity of the Secret Garden Party fund, the Is Land creators have been able to start work on a new version of the piece that will be presented at Burning Man. The team is still on the hunt for the original, however. Due to the time and money invested in Is Land, it would be a shame for this beautiful piece of art to disappear forever. According to wind patterns, the helium-filled sculpture should have touched down somewhere in the Czech Republic. Anyone who has seen Is Land or has information on its whereabouts can contact the designers through their website . Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: 42 Magnificent Works of Modern Earth and Land Art Technical and conceptual innovations have liberated creative modern land artists to create ever more amazing works of natural sculpture and earth architecture. 15 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» This Plastic World: Recycled Island Made of Old Bottles A huge “island” of plastic garbage is already floating in the Pacific. Why not turn it into the habitable, self-sustaining island city of the future? Click Here to Read More »» 16 of the World’s Wildest Wind Power Designs From low-cost home wind power generators to high-energy wind turbines here are 16 particularly creative, unique and innovative wind power generators and designs. 10 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Delana in Art & Design & Nature & Ecosystems & News & Politics . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Island In the (Air)Stream: Floating Sculpture Goes Missing

China’s Sea Of Green Algae Has Beachgoers Seeing Red

July 26, 2011 by  
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[ By Steve in Geography & Travel & History & Trivia & Nature & Ecosystems . ] Summer’s arrived and China ‘s green menace has returned along with it… we kudzu not! The massive bloom of stringy, slimy, and smelly Enteromorpha Prolifera algae that recently infested the seashore near Qingdao succeeded in keeping most (but not all) swimmers from enjoying a day at the beach . Green Goo Go Home! (images via: BBC , Chinabuzz and Sochina.net ) The east may be red, in the words of the popular Chinese government anthem, but the shocking green tide of algae that swamped beaches in the northeast part of the country is neither politically, aesthetically not environmentally correct. (images via: Debosh , CoastalCare and China Daily ) Enteromorpha Prolifera , to give it its official name, is a form of green algae that bursts into bloom if nutritional and meteorological conditions are just right. When that happens, the results are, well, just wrong. (images via: DailyMail UK and Yahoo News ) According to the North China Sea Branch (NCSB) of the State Ocean Administration, reports of the unsightly algae infestation began to be received in late June at the busy port and popular resort of Qingdao. (images via: Ghana Nation , Coastal Care and SMH ) Air temperatures approaching 30°C (86°F) and water temperatures just offshore reaching 20°C (68°F) had created the perfect storm for the mother of all algae blooms. Anyone complaining about China being “slow to go green” obviously hasn’t spent a summer in Qingdao! (images via: National Geographic , Qingdao(nese) and Reuters ) From an initial area of 330 sq km (127 sq mi), the algae bloom rapidly grew to cover a 12,400 sq km (4,790 sq mi) expanse of the Yellow Sea by June 23. (images via: SMH ) The advent of a persistent onshore wind then drove waves of floating algae onto the beaches near Qingdao: at one point approximately 440 km (275 miles) of shoreline was subsumed in bright green goop! A Verdant History (images via: Qingdao(nese) , MilitaryPhotos.net and China Mike ) Qingdao’s green plague is of relatively recent origin and can be directly attributed to the exponential growth of the city of Qingdao. A little over a century ago, the city’s current location on the Shandong Peninsula was occupied by a small and sleepy fishing village. (images via: Metropolis and Dr. Hostel ) The peninsula, however, was/is strategically located and Qingdao itself boasts a fine natural harbor. In 1897, Imperial Germany seized the environs and arm-twisted China’s decadent and decrepit government into granting the Kaiser a 99-year lease of the Kiautschou Bay concession. (image via: Travelpod ) Development of the city and surrounding area proceeded quickly: within just a few years several large stone churches had been built, the city and port boasted clean water and electric lighting, and the Tsingtao Brewery opened for business. It all seemed too good to be true, and so it was. Shortly after World War I began, a joint Japanese-British force conquered the German concession. Given the tumultuous series of wars and revolutionary upheaval which followed, it’s a wonder any hints of Qingdao’s German heritage remain, but they do – most notably the brewery (above). (images via: TripAdvisor/Mark Wilson and TripAdvisor/Mies ) From an original population of around 85,000 at the time of the German seizure of Qingdao, the city itself has ballooned to an astounding 7.5 million (2009) with millions more living in newly developed suburban areas. (images via: DailyMail/AP ) The city’s port is one of China’s busiest and the beaches that run along the Shandong Peninsula’s south-facing shore are hugely popular with vacationers from across northeastern China. Unfortunately, Qingdao’s economic success is negatively impacting its appeal as an unspoiled getaway. (images via: Qingdao(nese) and ChinaBuzz ) As the city grew, its infrastructure was hard-pressed to keep up. As well, agricultural activity on the peninsula resulted in nitrogen-rich runoff being swept into the bay and ocean. The combination of organic effluent from fertilizer and sewage with warm marine temperatures acted to produce algal blooms of ever-increasing size. (images via: YachtPals ) The problem gained worldwide attention in 2007 and 2008 when wall-to-wall algae blooms threatened to inundate training and competitive facilities for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics . (images via: Sochina.net and Telegraph UK ) Thousands of fishermen, students and “sea police” were dragooned into clearing the algae from the shoreline and over 100,000 tons of noisome seagrass were removed, allowing the Games to go on. (images via: Sulekha , Boston.com and Mirror UK ) Even the army was drafted (so to speak) into what became an all-out, epic effort to save the sailing venue – and save face for China in the bargain. Join the army and see the world? I’m guessing a lot of the PLA’s raw recruits figured they had a better chance of invading beaches than cleaning them up. A Blooming Shame (images via: China Daily , CRI and Global Times ) Just what is this algae, seagrass or seaweed? Enteromorpha Proliferaso is a form of algae that grows to resemble seaweed. Its long branches and kelp-like fronds help it clump together into huge, floating rafts of vegetation that casts a dark shadow on the sea life below. (images via: Yahoo News ) As the algae dies and sinks to the seafloor it can spark creation of vast “dead zones” as the bacteria digesting the dead algae suck the oxygen out of the seawater. (images via: ChinaBuzz and China Daily ) Found on seashores all over the world, Enteromorpha Proliferaso known in Hawaii as Limu ‘ele‘ele and is said to be edible… though considering the nutrients it grows on might cause one to lose their appetite. Unlike the algae in Red Tides, Enteromorpha Proliferaso isn’t toxic… just messy, smelly, annoying… and very, very green. (images via: DailyMail UK , Charlottesville Greenstone Blog and The Dirt ) Slime and stink notwithstanding, thousands of Chinese vacationers weren’t about to let a little (or a lot) of seaweed deprive them of their cherished dip in the ocean. You know, the ocean… that cool, clear, liquid underneath the rippling carpet of green slime? (images via: IB Times and National Geographic ) Some beachgoers appear to be somewhat acclimated to the algal overgrowth, with one child enthusing “It is like the green grass. It feels so soft.” (images via: Scott Brauer ) Meanwhile, local authorities seem to be in denial regarding the problem. “We don’t know where it originated and why it’s suddenly growing so rapidly,” said Professor Bao Xianwen from the Qingdao-based Ocean University of China. “It must have something to do with the change in the environment,” Bao speculated. Gee, ya think? Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: This Plastic World: Recycled Island Made of Old Bottles A huge “island” of plastic garbage is already floating in the Pacific. Why not turn it into the habitable, self-sustaining island city of the future? Click Here to Read More »» World’s Trashiest Hotel: Rome Hotel Built of Beach Garbage Think that fleabag motel you stayed in was trashy? It was nothing compared to this hotel, which was made entirely of garbage found on the beach. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» 6 Magnificent but Critically Threatened Primates Many primates have amazingly complex social structures, long evolutionary histories – but many are endangered in part due to the most infamous primates of all: us. 9 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steve in Geography & Travel & History & Trivia & Nature & Ecosystems . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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China’s Sea Of Green Algae Has Beachgoers Seeing Red

Architects Envision Hawaii-Sized Island Made of Recycled Plastic

April 13, 2010 by  
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(…) Read the rest of Architects Envision Hawaii-Sized Island Made of Recycled Plastic (294 words) (…) Read the rest of Architects Envision Hawaii-Sized Island Made of Recycled Plastic (294 words) © Bridgette for Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World , 2010. | Permalink | No comment | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: aquaculture , climate refugees , concept , eco design , farming , Floating Island , floating plastic , food production , green design , gyre , island , pacific gyre , pacific ocean , recycled island , Recycled Materials , renewable energy , Seaweed , self-sufficient , Solar Power , Sustainable Building , wave power , whim architects Feed enhanced by Better Feed from Ozh

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Architects Envision Hawaii-Sized Island Made of Recycled Plastic

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