Gorgeous modern home makes stunning use of recycled and salvaged materials

July 21, 2017 by  
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Architecture studio tenfiftyfive paired modern luxury with sustainable and nature-centric design in their design of this gorgeous house extension in Melbourne. Named the Park House, this Instagram-worthy dwelling is built around two mature gumtrees and clad in timber to blend into the surroundings. More than just a pretty picture, this stylish abode also boasts energy-efficient principles as well as a natural-materials palette largely foraged from recycled and salvaged items. Completed as an extension to an old heritage house, the Park House sports a sleek modern facade with simple, clean lines and a strong attention to detail. The boxy, top-heavy structure features a cantilevered first floor punctuated by protruding black steel windows that contrast beautifully with the timber facade. Full-height glazing wraps around the ground floor to let in an abundance of natural light and blur the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Fencing along the lot provides privacy. Related: Breezy addition keeps cool in Melbourne’s summers with smart passive design A large open-plan living room with a kitchen and dining area dominates the ground floor, while bedrooms are placed in the more closed-off upper floor. The use of timber is continued inside the home, where it can be seen in an exposed recycled wood ceiling in the living space as well as in the furnishings, stairway, and feature wall support built from old Oregon rafter. Some of the red brick used on the kitchen wall was recycled from garden paving and is complemented by a Statuario marble countertop. A green wall above the windows in the dining area adds a splash of nature indoors. Concrete floors with in-built hydronic heating provide thermal comfort as well as a noise barrier between floors. + tenfiftyfive Via Architecture and Design Images via tenfiftyfive

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Gorgeous modern home makes stunning use of recycled and salvaged materials

Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks

March 3, 2017 by  
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Archi-Union Architects have completed an unusual art exhibition space in Shanghai with the help of robots. Created for the Chi She artist group, the building in the city’s Xuhui district was built with recycled gray-green bricks salvaged from a former building. Designed with both traditional and contemporary elements, the Chi She exhibition space features an unusual protrusion made possible with advanced digital fabrication technology. The 200-square-meter Chi She exhibition space was built to replace a former historic building, the materials of which were salvaged and reused in the new construction. While the zigzagging roof has been raised and reconstructed from timber, the most eye-catching difference between the old and new buildings is the part of the wall above the entrance door that bulges out. The architects used a robotic masonry fabrication technique developed by Fab-Union to create the curved wall, which would have been difficult to precisely achieve with traditional means. Related: WeWork’s new coworking space in Shanghai features salvaged materials from the city’s past “The precise positioning of the integrated equipment of robotic masonry fabrication technique and the construction elaborately to the mortar and bricks by the craftsmen makes this ancient material, brick, be able to meet the requirements in the new era, and realizes the presentation of the design model consummately,” wrote the architects. “The dilapidation of these old bricks coordinated with the stretch display of the curving walls are narrating a connection between people and bricks, machines and construction, design and culture, which will be spread permanently in the shadow of external walls under the setting sun.” + Archi-Union Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Su Shengliang

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Robots construct an art gallery in Shanghai from recycled gray bricks

The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

March 3, 2017 by  
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Kalout Architecture Studio ‘s Imam Reza Cultural and Religious Complex in Tehran, Iran is a vibrant urban space that locals of all ages and social groups enjoy. To make the building’s ethos absolutely clear, the architects built the roof in the form of interlocking fingers, symbolizing “unity and social cohesion”. The beautiful 7000-square-meter center, which is located in the cultural zone of the capital, houses a mosque , an art gallery, a bookstore coffee shop, an amphitheater and an IT center. The building’s various functional zones are organized around the central glass-paneled dome in stone-clad wings. Related: Mosque for All: BIG Wins Competition To Design Inside-Out Albanian Cultural Center The dome arches over a traditional shabestan – an underground space typically found in Iranian houses, mosques, and schools. According to the architects, the unique design was influenced by both tradition and functionality, “The main form of the shabestan, with the grandeur of a religious space, provides the opportunity for a unique experience to fulfill the immemorial ambition to connect with the creator and feel the symbolic form of the dome. Following this main form, the side wings of the building with the supplementary functions rise from and rest on the ground to create an innovative form visually.” The dome is composed of handmade glass carved with the various words for god. On the exterior walkway, bricks are laid in an intricate pattern that runs the length of the walls. According to the architects, the two materials were used to represent the “ascending movement from earth to light”. Additional traditional features found in the complex include a sunken courtyard with a small reflecting pool, and a cedar statue that symbolizes “constancy, life and freedom”. + Kalout Architecture Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Parham Taghiof

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The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

Recycled bricks add rugged contrast to this contemporary Sydney home

September 5, 2016 by  
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Juxtaposition is at the core of the Llewellyn House design. “The conceptual starting point was contrasting tones of light and dark, knitting together old and new,” write the architects. “This is expressed through the specific combination of elements, forming an interior which is both rustic and slick, thin yet massive, dark and bright.” A beautiful example of this contrast can be seen in the extension built with aged recycled bricks set against a very thin and glossy black steel awning . Related: Renovated Jakarta home fights sultry summers with ventilation, green space and shade The new extension is set within the rear garden and comprises an open-plan kitchen and living area. To balance out the dark color palette of timber, steel, and porcelain, the Llewellyn House extension features bright white walls that reflect the natural light that streams in through glazing on both sides. The renovated home also includes restored Federation-style interiors painted white. + studioplusthree Via Dezeen Images via studioplusthree

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Recycled bricks add rugged contrast to this contemporary Sydney home

World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada

September 5, 2016 by  
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Canada started work on a huge cross-country network of trails for cyclists, hikers and other outdoor enthusiasts back in 1992, and the project is finally nearing completion. To date, over 20,000 kilometers or 12,906 miles of car-free trails have been connected, 26 percent of which are on water. According to The Great Trail website , 80 percent of Canada’s population lives within 30 minutes of what is said to be the largest recreational trail in the world. Which means Canucks have no excuse – save an angry moose or miserable weather – to waste away indoors. Apart from its impending completion sometime next year, a slew of headlines about bicycle ” superhighways ” in Europe has drawn new attention to the ambitious Great Trail project. Over two decades in the making, the extraordinary trail starts in Newfoundland, or “Kilometre Zero”, according to the website, and stretches west across the great white north to British Columbia. When it is completed, it will comprise 14,913 miles of mixed-use trails. While great emphasis has been placed in European cities on cycling as a form of green transportation , The Great Trail gives Canadians the opportunity to not only commute, but also enjoy a variety of other activities amid the country’s diverse landscapes and cityscapes. Walking or hiking, cycling, paddling, horseback riding, cross-country skiing and snowmobiling are top recommended pastimes. Albeit a boon for recreation, the Great Trail project has also boosted communities across the country. Related: New bike “greenway” stretching from Florida to Maine is 31% complete “Trail sections are owned, operated and maintained by local organizations, provincial authorities, national agencies and municipalities across Canada,” according to the website. The “Trans Canada Trail is represented by provincial and territorial organizations that is [sic] responsible for championing the cause of the Trail in their region. These provincial and territorial partners, together with local trail-building organizations, are an integral part of Trans Canada Trail and are the driving force behind its development.” Germany opened the first few miles of a 60-mile highway earlier this year, and the United States is planning its own bike greenway up the east coast, but neither compares with The Great Trail, a singular unifying project with benefits for all Canadian residents. + The Great Trail Via MTLBlog Images via Wikipedia and screenshot

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World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada

World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada

September 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada

Canada started work on a huge cross-country network of trails for cyclists, hikers and other outdoor enthusiasts back in 1992, and the project is finally nearing completion. To date, over 20,000 kilometers or 12,906 miles of car-free trails have been connected, 26 percent of which are on water. According to The Great Trail website , 80 percent of Canada’s population lives within 30 minutes of what is said to be the largest recreational trail in the world. Which means Canucks have no excuse – save an angry moose or miserable weather – to waste away indoors. Apart from its impending completion sometime next year, a slew of headlines about bicycle ” superhighways ” in Europe has drawn new attention to the ambitious Great Trail project. Over two decades in the making, the extraordinary trail starts in Newfoundland, or “Kilometre Zero”, according to the website, and stretches west across the great white north to British Columbia. When it is completed, it will comprise 14,913 miles of mixed-use trails. While great emphasis has been placed in European cities on cycling as a form of green transportation , The Great Trail gives Canadians the opportunity to not only commute, but also enjoy a variety of other activities amid the country’s diverse landscapes and cityscapes. Walking or hiking, cycling, paddling, horseback riding, cross-country skiing and snowmobiling are top recommended pastimes. Albeit a boon for recreation, the Great Trail project has also boosted communities across the country. Related: New bike “greenway” stretching from Florida to Maine is 31% complete “Trail sections are owned, operated and maintained by local organizations, provincial authorities, national agencies and municipalities across Canada,” according to the website. The “Trans Canada Trail is represented by provincial and territorial organizations that is [sic] responsible for championing the cause of the Trail in their region. These provincial and territorial partners, together with local trail-building organizations, are an integral part of Trans Canada Trail and are the driving force behind its development.” Germany opened the first few miles of a 60-mile highway earlier this year, and the United States is planning its own bike greenway up the east coast, but neither compares with The Great Trail, a singular unifying project with benefits for all Canadian residents. + The Great Trail Via MTLBlog Images via Wikipedia and screenshot

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World’s longest car-free trail stretching 15,000 miles to open next year in Canada

Tongjiang Primary School in Rural China is Made from Recycled Bricks

July 23, 2012 by  
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A good design should use as few resources as possible, and one of the best ways to achieve that is to build a structure using recycled materials. Architects Joshua Bolchover and John Lin of Rufwork have designed the Tongjiang Primary School with exactly this concept in mind. The school in the Jianxi Province of southeast China was built using recycled bricks from old broken down houses in the same district, salvaging these materials in innovative ways. Read the rest of Tongjiang Primary School in Rural China is Made from Recycled Bricks Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: china , Jiangxi , john lin , Joshua Bolchover , recycled brick , Recycled Materials , Rufwork , school design , Tongjiang Primary School

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Tongjiang Primary School in Rural China is Made from Recycled Bricks

Studio a+i’s Revised AIDS Memorial Park is a Meditative Green Trellis

July 23, 2012 by  
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While their original concept was denied by community members, Studio a+i has gone back to the drawing board to create a spectacular new design for the AIDS Memorial Park in Manhattan’s West Village.  Their second shot, a triangular trellis planted with vines, which would cover the 1,600 square foot plot, is being applauded as a “quiet, abstract” concept that “celebrates life and growth.” The original design “ Infinite Forest ” was a fenced-in concept filled with looking glasses, which posed not only safety concerns, but was also thought to be too focused on tragedy and loss of life, rather than future advances and positivity. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AIDS Memorial Park , green architecture , green design competition , landscaping , new york city parks , St. Vincent’s Hospital Rejuvenation , trellis design , west village

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Studio a+i’s Revised AIDS Memorial Park is a Meditative Green Trellis

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