UK tests cheaper, longer-lasting roads made with recycled plastic

April 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Around 24.8 million miles of roads crisscross the surface of Earth. And hundreds of millions of barrels of oil have been used for that development. Engineer Toby McCartney came up with a solution to that waste of natural resources and the growing plastic pollution problem. His company, Scotland-based MacRebur , lays roads that are as much as 60 percent stronger than regular asphalt roads and last around 10 times longer – and they’re made with recycled plastic. Our city roads require a lot of maintenance over time as weather deteriorates them and potholes open up. Meanwhile there are around five trillion pieces of plastic in the ocean. McCartney came up with an answer to both issues. He turns 100 percent recycled plastic into what he calls MR6 pellets, or small pellets of waste plastic, which replace bitumen , the material used to bind roads together (extracted from crude oil) and sold by oil companies like Shell. Related: Vancouver Becomes First City to Pave Its Streets With Recycled Plastic Normal roads are comprised of around 90 percent rock, sand, and limestone, with 10 percent bitumen. MacRebur’s process replaces most of the bitumen, using household waste plastic, farm waste, and commercial waste. Much of the trash would have otherwise ended up in a landfill . At asphalt plants the MR6 pellets are mixed with quarried rock and a bit of bitumen, and a plant worker told the BBC the process is actually the same “as mixing the conventional way with additions into a bitumen product.” McCartney was inspired to design plastic roads after his daughter’s teacher asked the class what lives in the ocean, and his daughter said, “Plastics.” He didn’t want her to grow up in a world where that was true. He’d also spent time in India, where he saw locals would fix holes in the road by putting waste plastic into the holes and then burning it. He started MacRebur with friends Nick Burnett and Gordon Reid. MacRebur’s first road was McCartney’s own driveway, and now the company’s roads have been laid in the county of Cumbria in the United Kingdom . + MacRebur Via the BBC Images via MacRebur Facebook

Excerpt from: 
UK tests cheaper, longer-lasting roads made with recycled plastic

Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods

April 25, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Those who live in glass houses… probably wish they had held out for this gorgeous, hand-crafted stained glass sanctuary. Built by artist and jeweler Neile Cooper, the dreamy Glass Cabin is located in the middle of a lush green forest. The tiny retreat is made almost entirely from repurposed window frames and lumber, and its handcrafted stained glass panels depict flowers, birds, butterflies, and other nature-inspired scenes. Cooper built the glass sanctuary behind her home in Mohawk, New Jersey to use as a reading space and art studio. Using repurposed window frames and lumber for the frame, she clad the tiny structure with her own colorful designs. The idyllic setting gave her the ideal place to showcase her nature-inspired artwork. Related: Wim Delvoye’s Creepy Stained Glass Windows Are Made From Recycled X-Rays Cooper’s work includes beautiful hand-crafted jewelry made from real butterfly wings . She drew upon these pieces as inspiration for the dreamy glass structure. The large panel over the door has a large amber butterfly, and the rest of the panels feature detailed, colorful renderings of nature and wildlife. + Neile Cooper Images via Neile Cooper Instagram

See more here: 
Artist builds incredible stained-glass cabin in the middle of the woods

Apple announces plans to make all products from recycled materials

April 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Apple just announced plans to close the loop and make all of its products from recycled materials. We tend not to realize how damaging our electronics are for the environment – from mining materials to the toxic effects when we dump them . Apple starting tackling these problems last year with its  recycling robot , and now the electronics giant wants to only use recycled materials in its devices. Apple recently released its latest environmental report, and in it, the company claims that it is working towards using recycled materials to create its next generation of products. This will happen, in part, by reclaiming and re-using old Apple devices. Obviously they aren’t there yet, but Apple has never been shy when setting goals. Related: Apple just unveiled a blazing fast iPhone recycling robot Apple has been steadily shifting towards renewable resources. Its data centers all run on renewable energy , and it has partnered with or built its own solar and wind farms to generate the energy it needs. The company has also been recycling old devices, which saved Apple over $40 million in gold re-use alone. Via Engadget

More here: 
Apple announces plans to make all products from recycled materials

IKEA unveils plan to lift 200,000 people out of poverty

April 19, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

When most people think of IKEA , they most likely think of affordable furniture and trendy home accessories. But many people are unaware of the company’s lofty social goals. In addition to their efforts to promote sustainability , it turns out IKEA is also working on a plan to alleviate poverty for Syrian refugees and other disadvantaged people around the globe. IKEA recently announced it’s building new production centers in Jordan this summer, as part of a plan to create employment for 200,000 disadvantaged people around the world. The facilities will be open and running by August, and will provide jobs to refugees producing rugs, cushions, bedspreads, and other handmade woven items. These particular facilities are the result of a partnership with the Jordan River Foundation , a non-governmental organization founded by Jordan’s Queen Rania. To start out, these particular plants will only employ 100 people, rising to 400 within two years. About half will be local workers and the other half will be Syrian refugees . Related: IKEA’s Lena Pripp-Kovac talks to Inhabitat about their sustainability program The new production centers are just one of many projects the furniture giant is working to establish around the world. Already, they’ve launched programs to help Indian women and Sweden’s immigrant population, which employ about 2,000 people collectively. The ultimate goal is to eventually employ about 200,000 people around the world through these initiatives. Rather than lead the projects themselves, IKEA is teaming up with local social entrepreneurs – organizations that help use business solutions to alleviate poverty, rather than simply distributing aid. Not only does this help provide jobs for people who desperately need them, it also helps organizations that would normally be too small to meet IKEA’s supplier guidelines to get their work into stores around the globe. Related: IKEA is launching a whole range of “no waste” products made from recycled materials This isn’t the first time IKEA has used its clout for social good. The company also recently established the IKEA Foundation to help children in poor communities, and unveiled an award-winning flat-pack refugee shelter design . So the next time you buy a new bookshelf or visit just to sample the Swedish fare at the restaurant, you can feel good knowing your purchase is helping others around the world. Via Dezeen Images via YouTube/Screenshot

More here: 
IKEA unveils plan to lift 200,000 people out of poverty

Nigerian man invents cool jet car that operates on land and water

April 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Nigerian man invents cool jet car that operates on land and water

If you’re ever in Lagos, Nigeria , watch for a quirky aero-amphibious jet car roaming the streets. Self-taught inventor Kehinde Durojaiye transformed a bunch of junk he found into a vehicle capable of operating on land or in water. Durojaiye hopes his invention will one day be a common sight across the country. Durojaiye’s jet car is made with discarded materials, like an old keyboard, an office chair, and a tricycle steering wheel. He also repurposed plastic , wood, and Styrofoam. He said he’s traveled as far away as Ibadan in his vehicle, which is about 84 miles away from Lagos , and that the jet car can reach speeds of around 75 miles per hour on land and six knots at sea. Related: Disabled refugee inventor builds an electric bike to get around camp Durojaiye told CNN, “We want the whole world to know it is possible to have a kind of machine that can move on land, on sea, and fly, and perhaps move under the sea. That’s my ultimate goal.” He invents out of a workshop near a Lagos lagoon dump site, and has already built four prototypes of his car. He also works on other devices like a remote-controlled drone , and has been inventing since childhood. Now married and the father of four children, Durojaiye continues to tinker with his jet car, hoping to make it fly. The jet car has already attracted attention in Lagos; the city is filled with Hyundais and Toyotas so Durojaiye’s vehicle really stands out. He says when he drives people often want to stop and snap pictures of the car on their phones, and have been surprised the vehicle can travel on both land and sea. Lagos is notorious for its congestion, and CNN speculated a flying car like Durojaiye’s could ease traffic. Via CNN Images via screenshot

Read more:
Nigerian man invents cool jet car that operates on land and water

6 Retailers with Impressive Recycling Programs

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on 6 Retailers with Impressive Recycling Programs

Although many common household items are easy for most of us to recycle through municipalities, others are more complicated. Some retailers have stepped up by offering recycling programs to encourage wider participation. These six retailers that…

See the original post here:
6 Retailers with Impressive Recycling Programs

Recycling fishing gear is a net positive for startups and oceans

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Recycling fishing gear is a net positive for startups and oceans

Companies such as Aquafil are biting at the chance to recycle more than 700,000 tons of discarded marine gear that threaten marine life.

Read the original here:
Recycling fishing gear is a net positive for startups and oceans

The profitable hospital system with sustainability in its DNA

April 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The profitable hospital system with sustainability in its DNA

Gundersen Health Systems became the first U.S. hospital to reach renewable energy independence, saved $3 million and improved community health.

Read the rest here:
The profitable hospital system with sustainability in its DNA

Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

April 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

Here’s something we’ve never seen before: a structure made entirely of pants! Starchitects Diller Scofidio+ Renfro just unveiled a sprawling pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans in Milan. The installation is called Linking Minds , and it re-interprets the idea of using ready-made modules (in this case pants) in architecture. The surreal jean canopy soars over the historic Palazzo Litta in Milan. While the individual pairs of pants represent the human scale of urban life, the meshed twisted structure points to a sense of community and the collective nature of architecture. Liz Diller engaged with the historical Palazzo Litta in 5VIE during Milan Design Week 2017 to reinterpret one of the most basic architectural elements: the roof. Formally, Diller’s suspended structure resembles the 3D-printed twisted mesh typically used for festivals. However, in this case the structure is realized with an unexpected, simple but iconic material: denim. Jeans are one of the most ubiquitous garments around the world, however they’re also very private and intimate items that we wear in direct contact with our skin. Related: 14 conversation-starting chairs that push the boundaries of design Jeans are also a curious object in terms of structure. Having two legs and one waist, it has an implicit structural logic that allows various combinations and spatial patterns. Connected waist-to-waist and cuff-to-cuff, and filled with air, the Linking Minds installation is a visually dynamic work of art and architecture that is one of the main landmarks of Milan Design Week 2017 . Diller Scofidio+ Renfro + Milan Design Week

More: 
Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

It’s raining tequila from a cloud in Berlin

March 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on It’s raining tequila from a cloud in Berlin

Berlin winters see a lot of rain, but this is the first time it’s rained tequila. The Mexico Tourist Board wanted to lure Germans to Mexico by combining one of the things they hate most: rain , with one of the things they love best: tequila. The result is a puffy cloud of happiness that rains tequila any time it rains outside. The Mexico Tourist Board teamed up with Lapiz USA to create a cloud that rains tequila. Lapiz took ultrasonic humidifiers to turn tequila into a mist, which they shot into the air to create a tequila-based cloud. Once that mist condensed, it created droplets of tequila that you can actually collect and drink. It’s an ingenious way to turn the winter blahs in Germany into a party. Related: San Diego brewery unveils beer made from 100% recycled wastewater Unfortunately, tequila clouds won’t be filling the skies anytime soon. The exhibit is being featured in an art space in Berlin called Urban Spree, but if you can’t make it there, you can still grab a glass of tequila next time it rains and dream. Via The Daily Mail Images via Lapiz USA

Here is the original:
It’s raining tequila from a cloud in Berlin

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1028 access attempts in the last 7 days.