Sweden opens an entire mall full of reclaimed goods

April 7, 2017 by  
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You’re familiar with thrift stores – maybe you shop at one from time to time. But have you ever seen an entire mall of reclaimed goods? Such a thrifter’s paradise exists in Sweden , about 1.5 hours west of central Stockholm. ReTuna Återbruksgalleria , or ReTuna Recycling Galleria, peddles reused or upcycled goods, pioneering the climate -friendly future of the shopping mall. How does ReTuna work? People can submit items worthy of reclaiming or restoring to the Return. Staff from the city of Eskilstuna’s Activity, Motivation, and Work unit sort the donated items, which are then fixed up, repaired, or transformed to be sold in the mall. The goods are assigned to the mall shops based on each one’s business plan. There are 14 shops inside ReTuna, along with a restaurant serving organic food . Related: 6 Places You Can Find Trash to Transform into Treasure The purpose of the creative mall is to explore a new way of shopping resulting in less harm to the environment . All businesses in the mall must operate in an environmentally friendly way, and if they must purchase new goods – such as the cafe – the items must be organic or climate-friendly. According to the mall’s website, “ Sustainability is not about holding back and living less – but achieving more with the resources we already have.” Mall manager Anna Bergström says on the website they envision customers stopping by to donate old furniture or clothing, and then entering the mall to find maybe a new jacket or a new lamp, and having a bite in the organic restaurant. She said, “When you leave here, you should feel that you did something good for the environment.” The ReTuna website says it is “perhaps the world’s first shopping mall that will take advantage of things that need new homes.” The recycling mall will host an information meeting on April 20, 2017. + ReTuna Återbruksgalleria Images via ReTuna Återbruksgalleria and ReTuna Återbruksgalleria Facebook

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Sweden opens an entire mall full of reclaimed goods

8 universities given three years to develop a self-driving Chevy Bolt

April 7, 2017 by  
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We’re getting closer to the year many automakers predicted would see self-driving vehicles on the road. While Ford has made great advances lately, General Motors isn’t yet ready to stand on the side line with other automakers in 2020. In order to help bridge that gap, GM has announced it is giving eight American universities a Chevy Bolt as part of the new autonomous vehicle design competition called AutoDrive Challenge. The AutoDrive Challenge includes teams from Kettering University, Michigan State University, Michigan Tech, North Carolina A&T University, Texas A&M University, University of Toronto, University of Waterloo and Virginia Tech. Each school will be given three years to to develop and demonstrate a fully autonomous Chevy Bolt. Related: The new Nissan Leaf will be able to drive autonomously on the highway While three years may seem like a long time, the AutoDrive Challenge will be quite tough. At the end of the three years, each team will have to complete the development of a Chevy Bolt that will be able to navigate an urban driving course, autonomously and without any human interaction. In addition to receiving the Bolt, GM has also tapped strategic partners and suppliers to aid the students in their technology development by providing vehicle parts and software. Additionally, throughout the competition, students and faculty will be invited to attend technology-specific workshops to help them in their concept refinement and overall autonomous technical understanding. “GM is very excited to work closely with these eight universities over the next three years,” said Ken Kelzer, GM vice president of Global Vehicle Components and Subsystems. “The students and faculty at these schools bring deep knowledge and technical skills to the competition. We are proud to help offer these students the hands-on experience necessary for them to make an immediate impact on the automotive world when they graduate.” The AutoDrive Challenge kicks off this fall. Images @GM + General Motors

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8 universities given three years to develop a self-driving Chevy Bolt

9 Valentines Day gifts that last longer than a bouquet of flowers or box of chocolates

February 9, 2017 by  
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If you are feeling like you are in a Valentine’s Day gifts idea rut, we’ve got some good, green suggestions for you. While some are simply more eco-friendly and sustainable versions of traditional Valentine’s presents, we’ve also rounded up a few other unexpected ideas, gifts that benefit others. Whether helping to fund solar energy projects in Chad, empowering women, or employing artisans around the world, these presents are made to last, and that is good for everyone. 1. Succulent garden Long-lasting and harder for brown thumbs to kill, succulent plants make a lovely gift for homeowners and Lula’s Garden takes in-home and easy gardening to the next level with its Valentine’s Day collection . The SoCal-sourced succulents come in their own planter gift box and are pre-planted, eliminating packaging waste. Cali residents have even more options for a selection. 2. Lingerie with an eco ethos Lingerie isn’t exactly a novel Valentine’s Day gift idea, but these aren’t your average bra and underwear offerings. Naja’s gorgeous lingerie is made using digital and sublimation printing, drastically reducing the amount of water used in the manufacturing process. They also include fabrics made from recycled plastic bottles and are experimenting with other eco-friendly fabrics and technologies. The majority of Naja’s garment factory employees are single moms or female heads of households; in addition to flexible work policies, above-market wages, and healthcare benefits, the children of every Naja garment worker receives books, school supplies, uniforms, and school meals paid by Naja. Naja is serious about empowering women, but the brand is happy to toe the line between playful and sophisticated with cheeky knickers printed with adorable animals as well as elegant nude lingerie options for a variety of skin shades. 3. Artisan gift box Subscription gift boxes have exploded in recent years, and the monthly gifts from Globe In bring a socially conscious and artistic bent to the trend. Each themed “box” comes in a handwoven palm leaf basket filled with a variety of goodies. The Cozy Box, for example, includes a fair trade scarf from Thailand, a hand-painted Tunisian mug, and fair trade cocoa powder from Ghana . Whether you buy a one-off box or a monthly subscription, your gift is guaranteed to be a hit and to help artisans and makers around the world. 4. Hand-poured candles that help provide solar energy Starling Project candles come in four fragrances ranging from sultry Juniper + Saffron to comforting Vanilla + Hemlock. Soy-based and hand-poured in Brooklyn, the candles come in handmade glass containers and last up to 60 hours. Starling candles help bring light to homes across the world: the company has donated over $100,000 to UNICEF solar energy projects in Chad. 5. Sustainable and sophisticated jewelry Philadelphia-based jewelry brand Bario Neal is known for creating classic and cutting edge pieces that use ethically-sourced and recycled materials and for using low-impact environmentally conscious practices (which you can read about here ). Whether you go the custom route or grab a pair of modern diamond studs , the jewelry wizards at this proudly feminist company will create a piece that is traceable and responsible. 6. The gift of education The quickest way to make a $58 gift last a whole year? Make a donation to the International Rescue Committee and sponsor a girl’s education for a school year . The IRC works around the globe to help people whose lives are affected by conflict and crisis and to improve communities through education, economic wellbeing, and health efforts. In 2015, the IRC helped educate more than 13,000 girls in Afghanistan alone! 7. Hand-crafted home goods made from reclaimed and repurposed materials The husband and wife team that formed Peg and Awl have a gift for creating  practical and durable heirlooms for both the home and people. Their ever-expanding line of handmade goods includes roomy waxed canvas weekender bags with vintage zippers ,  macabre recycled metal rings , and a tree swing . Every piece is crafted in an old casket factory, and many are reclaimed from materials that are over 100-years-old. Image via Tamar Nahir Yanai’s Etsy page 8. A crafting kit Give the gift of creativity…and perhaps a little peace and quiet. An embroidery kit is a perfect, easy entrée into the world of crafting ; it’s also a balm for the soul during turbulent times. Whether you choose a kit with a wildflower theme, a mandala design, or something unexpected , getting your love’s hands moving in another way besides working their thumbs to a frenzy on their device is rejuvenating and restorative, not to mention fun. If you are gifting this to a mom or dad with young ones, be sure to include a “coupon” to watch his or her little ones so that crafting time is blissfully uninterrupted. 9. Recycled glass barware Elevate your after-dinner drinks with recycled glassware from Bambeco . Pick your poison and sip it thoughtfully, perhaps from the five beer flight  which includes a reclaimed wine barrel stave holder as well as five glasses made from recycled wine coolers.  Or knock back a cold one in a recycled   lager glass crafted in a factory that uses recycled cooking and engine oil to fuel the furnace and reuses gray water and collected rainwater in the production process. Lead image via Lula’s Garden

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9 Valentines Day gifts that last longer than a bouquet of flowers or box of chocolates

8 abandoned buildings transformed into absolute dream spaces

October 26, 2016 by  
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While many people see abandoned spaces as battered and useless, many architects see inspiration for a grand transformation. The following eight projects rejuvenated derelict buildings into usable, vibrant locations for bustling new businesses or cozy homes. Through adaptive reuse and creative restructuring of space and materials, each designer has embraced the passage of time, blending old with new in unique and surprising ways. Mid-century grain silo becomes a gorgeous, two-person tiny house The last thing that comes to mind when thinking of an old 1950s grain silo is a perfect, cozy spot for a home, but that is exactly what architect Christoph Kaiser and his wife envisioned. After purchasing a dismantled midcentury silo and moving it to their downtown Phoenix plot, Christoph went to work customizing doors and windows for the home. Spending just $350 on scrap walnut planks found on Craigslist, he was able to create curved fixtures and platforms that fit perfectly in the circular space. The loft bedroom, bathed in natural light emanating from a skylight, is accessible by a spiral staircase. The 340-square-foot home is accompanied by plenty of outdoor space for lounging and gardening. Gigantic coal gasometers transformed into thriving Vienna communities These century-old Viennese gas tanks were all but forgotten until a decade ago, when several starchitects (at the invitation of local neighbors) transformed them into vibrant residential communities . After being decommissioned in the 1980s, these leftover structures from old gas utility companies were renovated into mixed-used communities with apartments, shops, and other amenties, by Jean Nouvel, Coop Himmelb(l)au, Manfred Wehdorn, and Wilhelm Holzbauer. The 230-foot, brick-clad structures, which now house 615 apartments, a student dormitory, a daycare center, offices, over 70 shops, restaurants, and bars, as well as the Vienna National Archive, first had to be registered as heritage sites in order to avoid demolition. Their complete transformation into thriving communities is nothing short of incredible. The Gasometers have become little cities within a city, and have developed a unique village character in each building. Architects, urban planners and sociologists around the world study the gasometers as a model of successful adaptive reuse and community planning. Old 1920s bank is transformed into a luxurious co-working space The old Royal Bank of Canada headquarters is open for business again after six years of lying dormant, except now new tenants have joined the mix. The ornate space has been transformed into the Crew co-working space with minimal changes to the historic decor. Montreal’s dedicated freelancers can pay a $450 monthly fee to access open desks, brass-clad private rooms, a cafe, and conference rooms in these stunning surroundings. The 50-foot-tall vaulted ceilings and glowing chandeliers serve as a throwback to the original 12,000-square-foot building constructed in 1928. Architect Henri Cleinge led the transformation, carefully preserving original elements. A vibrant kindergarten pops up in a former Chinese “ghost city” Zhengzhou used to be known for its imbalance of newly built buildings and people living and working in them. The former “ghost city” has been making a comeback and the architecture firm Crossboundaries has helped the rebranding with an abandoned building born again as a bright and colorful kindergarten. The Soyoo Joyful Growth Center now stands where three empty, decade-old circular structures once stood. Colorful ropes, diagonally installed from roof to ground, create a warmer facade, while cantilevered tubes popping out from the structure frame the view from inside. An interactive interior “subway” system of colored paths helps allows children explore different areas of their environment with the explicit goal of boosting their creativity. Derelict London post office transformed into an artisanal bakery Finding inspiration in an old post office in London’s East Finchley, architect Lucy Tauber revitalized the space so Margot Craft Bakery could move in. The renovation takes advantage of an existing glazed shopfront that allows passersby to admire the displayed baked goods and bustle of the staff in the kitchen. The minimalist interior design provides a clean and inviting atmosphere, with the pop of handmade cement floor tiles and reclaimed teak counters. Framing these elegant features are a backdrop of steel and ribbed glass, mixing industrial with old-fashioned Parisian design. Meow Wolf turns abandoned bowling alley into a fantastic glow-in-the-dark game Stroll into this abandoned Santa Fe bowling alley and you will find an oversized, glow-in-the-dark game in the space. Meow Wolf , an artist collective, transformed the building, called The House of Eternal Return, to include mind-bending rooms, colors, and props that work together to give visitors clues about the fictional Selig family and their plight. The interactive adventure, which took six writers and 150 artists to design, allows guests to roam throughout the massive 20,000-square-foot attraction. It is open to the public and is the sister project of St. Louis’ famous City Museum. Abandoned Shanghai factory is now an industrial-chic Ceramic House Archi-Union Architects gave a former chemical fiber factory a modern-industrial makeover. Designed for a ceramic artist in need of a showroom and workspace, the Shanghai space underwent a chic revival for its new tenant. An extra floor, topped with slatted timber, was added to the Ceramic House to increase square footage, leaving most of the original concrete and brick framework intact. Large windows and an airy balcony bring in natural light, illuminating contemporary features against an industrial backdrop. Neglected London bakery transformed into beautiful luxury housing Instead of letting an abandoned 19th century bakery fade away into obscurity, Jo Cowen Architects revamped the space, including a nearby lodge, granary, and coach house, into a luxury housing development. London’s Bakery Place now holds 11 residential units with clean lines and modern design. The throwback cobblestones, exposed brick, and cast iron columns mingle with contemporary herringbone flooring, and stark white walls contrast with industrial fixtures. From the 1898 construction, the space has experienced a rebirth while still paying homage to its historic roots. Images via Henri Clienge , Meow Wolf , Arch-Union Architects , Crossboundaries , Lucy Tauber , Christoph Kaiser , Jo Cowen Architects

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8 abandoned buildings transformed into absolute dream spaces

BREEAM Excellent Everyman Theatre Renovation Reuses 25,000 Bricks in Liverpool

April 10, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of BREEAM Excellent Everyman Theatre Renovation Reuses 25,000 Bricks in Liverpool Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: auditorium , BREEAM , brick , England , Everyman Theatre , green , Haworth Tompkins , liverpool , natural ventilation , Reclaimed , recycled , Sustainable , theater , theatre

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BREEAM Excellent Everyman Theatre Renovation Reuses 25,000 Bricks in Liverpool

you&me Creates an Interactive Art Exhibit in Greece from Reclaimed Materials

October 28, 2013 by  
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you&me  collaborated with the Greek artist and sculptor, Dionysis Papadatos to create an interactive exhibition of his works at the Kryti Cultural Centre in Zakynthos, Greece. The exhibition explores themes of natural and artificial landscapes, creating playful and immersive juxtapositions both within the exhibition space itself and in the surrounding landscape of the olive grove. The concept for the exhibition takes cues Krypti’s identity, and wayfinding is curated as a game of ‘Hide and Seek’. The visitor’s experience starts inside the exhibition building where the artworks sit on cut tree trunk plinths, and then continues outside. Artworks are found following a trail of brightly colored insertions. A series of picture frames compose new views and draw you to the exhibits; a sky blue ladder takes you to an artwork perched on an olive branch; an acid yellow trunk reveals another; a seminar table hosts workshops; and two stools made from olive oil tanks invite you to sit and discuss. The materials from the exhibition are entirely recycled . The exhibit will be open until November 14, 2013. + you&me Architecture The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: artificial landscapes , Greek artist , interactive exhibition , Kryti Cultural Centre , Recycled Materials , sculptor Dionysis Papadatos , you&me        

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Sasufi Gives a Melbourne Patisserie an Elegant Upgrade with Reclaimed Wooden Doors

March 6, 2013 by  
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Designer Sasufi has given a series of reclaimed wooden doors a new life as part of a stylish and green interior belonging to a cute patisserie located in Melbourne, Australia. The idea behind By Josephine’ s new look was to create a homage to the traditional nineteenth century French cafe while transforming discarded doors into modern interior paneling with clean lines. The reclaimed wood was first arranged in a patchwork formation, and Sasufi then painted them white to create a unified and contemporary design. Read the rest of Sasufi Gives a Melbourne Patisserie an Elegant Upgrade with Reclaimed Wooden Doors Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , by josephine , discarded timber , eco design , green design , Reclaimed Materials , recycled timber , sasufi , sustanable architecture

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Sasufi Gives a Melbourne Patisserie an Elegant Upgrade with Reclaimed Wooden Doors

BuckleyGrayYeoman Livens Up a Historic Building in Scotland with a Shipping Container Addition

December 4, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of BuckleyGrayYeoman Livens Up a Historic Building in Scotland with a Shipping Container Addition Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: BuckleyGrayYeoman , Cargotecture , chicken , dundee , Fritz Hansen , historic building , industrial , mural , Nando’s , portuguese , Reclaimed , Restaurant , Scotland , shipping container , victorian

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BuckleyGrayYeoman Livens Up a Historic Building in Scotland with a Shipping Container Addition

Colossal Tiger Made From Reclaimed Timber Springs to Life in Hungary

October 11, 2012 by  
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This giant timber tiger leaped into life during the ‘Hello Wood’ art camp in Hungary , which brought 200 young designers and architects together to form projects for eight different Hungarian communities. Best of all, the ferocious feline installation is made entirely from salvaged lumber ! Read the rest of Colossal Tiger Made From Reclaimed Timber Springs to Life in Hungary Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: green art , hello wood , reclaimed timber installation , salvaged wood art , sustainable design , timber tiger

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Colossal Tiger Made From Reclaimed Timber Springs to Life in Hungary

Study Shows that Nuclear Power Plants in Europe are Not Ready for Disaster

October 11, 2012 by  
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The Fukushima disaster following the tsunami that hit Japan in 2011 was an eye-opening event that caused many to wonder just how safe nuclear power is. Thanks to a new study commissioned as a result of the disaster, we have an answer – and it doesn’t look good. The results of the study show that of 145 reactors examined in Europe, the vast majority of them fail in one or more safety preparedness aspects. Read the rest of Study Shows that Nuclear Power Plants in Europe are Not Ready for Disaster Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Europe Power Plants , European Nuclear Safety Regulators Group , Fukushima disaster , Fukushima safety , natural disasters , nuclear power , nuclear power plants , nuclear safety

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Study Shows that Nuclear Power Plants in Europe are Not Ready for Disaster

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