Dilapidated 1800s dairy barn resurrected into a stunning home in Wyoming

June 8, 2017 by  
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Architecture firm JLF Design Build has breathed new life into a dilapidated 1800s dairy barn by transforming it into a stunning new home. “The Creamery” was built using materials salvaged from an abandoned dairy farm in Montana and reconstructed just outside of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. According to the architects, the ambitious project focused on retaining the same “authentic craftsmanship and rugged austerity” of the original stone building, while converting it into a contemporary living space. According to the creamery’s history, the original structure was built by anonymous Scottish stonemasons who laid two-foot-thick walls that lasted centuries. However, left empty and and unprotected for decades, the structure fell into severe disrepair. After convincing their antique-loving clients to acquire the original barn as “the ultimate antique”, the team used painstaking care to gather and transport as much of the old building’s materials as possible to Wyoming where they rebuilt a stunning new home in an idyllic setting. Related: 6 barns converted into beautiful new homes The home’s stone structure pays a beautiful homage to its original design, both on the outside as well as the inside. The interior decoration is pure rustic sophistication, with beautiful stone walls, exposed wooden trusses on the ceiling and large reclaimed wood planks as flooring. The structure is now home to a family who appreciates the timeless architecture of the design, “The relic itself inspired a sense of responsibility to its origins,” says JLF Design Build principal Paul Bertelli. “This building in its existing form, with its scale and proportion, was much purer than any contemporary architectural solution we could have applied. Ultimately doing nothing at all was the genius of the architecture in this project.” + JLF Design Build Photography by Audrey Hall

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Dilapidated 1800s dairy barn resurrected into a stunning home in Wyoming

Architects transform 18th century barn with seamless contemporary extension

January 20, 2017 by  
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Bringing historic structures back to life is a challenge for any architect, but when the building goes back to 1792, the task is incredibly delicate. Adam Knibb Architects were recently charged with adding a contemporary extension to a protected and locally-adored historic barn in Alresford, Hampshire, UK. Working with local preservation organizations, the architects managed to maintain the original structure while seamlessly incorporating a new luminous living space within the aptly-named Hurdle House. Having been used for the original sheep fairs as far back as 1792, the structure is a beloved landmark for the small town and considered “a gem of Industrial Archaeology”. As such, the renovation process would be a delicate one of finding a secure way of adding contemporary additions without harming the original barn structure . Related: 6 barns converted into beautiful new homes The home is set into a large detached barn with a front and back garden, affording incredible views of the surrounding greenery. To blend the new extension into the original barn structure, a pre-fabricated CLT timber frame was chosen for the exterior cladding. This decision was also key in cutting down construction time. As for the design itself, the architects focused on the home’s natural-setting as a key element in the renovation process . Working with the Winchester Conservation department, they were granted permission to remove a rear bay window to connect the home to a new extension, which would become the primary living space of the home. To open the connection, but create a sense of boundary, a frameless glass partition was used to connect the old structure to the new. The new extension houses the large kitchen and dining area, along with a small living space and study. To separate the distinctive uses of the public areas from the private spaces, the designers used a series of visual barriers in lieu of doors or other physical obstacles. Large glass windows and doors flood the interior with natural light. + Adam Knibb Architects Via Archdaily Images via James Morris

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Architects transform 18th century barn with seamless contemporary extension

Wyoming architects convert former hayloft into light-filled guest home

January 17, 2017 by  
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Nothing tugs at our country-loving hearts quite like a good barn conversion . With this minimalist renovation in Wyoming, Carney Logan Burke Architects transformed a weathered farm building into a refined, light-filled guest house. Using reclaimed materials to help offset the project’s environmental impact, the firm deftly retains the original structure’s unique character. The Barn in Wilson is set into a lush green meadow. Extra large windows on one side of the loft flood the interior with natural light , offering unobstructed views of the surrounding greenery and majestic Teton Range in the distance. Related:Beautiful converted barn hides a secret library in Oxfordshire The natural setting and historic nature of the structure guided the renovation process. Reclaimed barnwood and cedar shake shingles give the exterior the appearance of a long-weathered barn without the maintenance headaches. The project’s most compelling feature can be found inside on the second floor. Originally a hayloft, the open space was outfitted as a sophisticated guest room, kitchenette, and gym. The living space is flooded with natural light, which enhances the reclaimed oak floors and plank ceiling with exposed trusses. The bottom level is used as a garage and workspace, resulting in an elegant, multipurpose guesthouse we’d be more than happy to live in. + Carney Logan Burke Architects Via Uncrate Photography by Audrey Hall / Carney Logan Burke Architects

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Wyoming architects convert former hayloft into light-filled guest home

Wyoming lawmakers launch bill that would ban selling renewable energy

January 17, 2017 by  
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In a move that puts the “R” in regressive, a group of Republican lawmakers in Wyoming just launched a bill that would effectively ban selling wind and solar power in the state. The measure proposes to fine utilities for purchasing energy produced by large-scale renewable power projects. According to Inside Climate News , the bill is chiefly sponsored by representatives from the state’s main coal-producing counties. If enacted, it would force utilities to use power from only approved energy sources like natural gas, nuclear power, hydroelectric, oil – and of course coal. Your average homeowner could still install a rooftop solar, backyard wind or other renewable energy setup, but the state’s utilities would get slapped with big fines for buying power from renewable projects. According to Inside Climate News, the move is confusing some locals who know the lay of the land. “I haven’t seen anything like this before,” said Shannon Anderson, director of local organizing group, Powder River Basin Resource Council . “This is essentially a reverse renewable energy standard.” But Inside Climate News adds that Republican Senator David Miller, the bill’s sponsor, says the goal of the legislation is to make sure Wyoming residents have access to inexpensive power. Related: Judge orders Exxon-Mobil to disclose 40 years of climate change documents “Wyoming is a great wind state and we produce a lot of wind energy,” Miller said. “We also produce a lot of conventional energy, many times our needs. The electricity generated by coal is amongst the least expensive in the country. We want Wyoming residences to benefit from this inexpensive electrical generation. “He added that he doesn’t want to see Wyoming “averaged into” other states that require utilities to supply “more expensive” renewable energy. The proposed bill would allow renewable energy producers in the state to sell power to customers outside Wyoming without a penalty. The cost of selling power in their own state would be $10 per megawatt hour of energy sold. Republicans significantly outnumber Democrats in both the state’s House and Senate, but Miller still puts his chances of passing the bill at “50 percent or less.” Via Inside Climate News Images via Flickr Creative Commons, Jeremy Buckingham and CGP Grey , Wikimedia Commons

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Wyoming lawmakers launch bill that would ban selling renewable energy

Enchanting LED mushrooms can transform any room into a glowing forest

November 2, 2016 by  
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We previously featured Takano’s work in 2010, and the artist has since produced hundreds more of his handcrafted mushroom lamps. According to at home vox , Takano can produce an average of 15 lamps every two months. His unique creations sell out incredibly quick (as noted by Tokyobling ) and, due to their delicate nature, are only sold locally and are not shipped abroad. Related: Amazing Chandelier Transforms Any Room Into a Fairytale Forest Takano crafts the mushrooms out of dyed resin clay. The LED and wiring are skillfully hidden inside the tiny mushroom sculpture and inside the reclaimed driftwood base. Some of the lamps come with a plastic on/off dial for a playful retro touch. + Yukio Takano Via Colossal Images via Tokyobling , Silver Shell

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Enchanting LED mushrooms can transform any room into a glowing forest

Vernacular-inspired Delaware home built with recycled barn wood

August 31, 2016 by  
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The house, called Rural Loft, is located in an area of Delaware dominated by agriculture . It channels the local vernacular and references the form and materiality of barns. In fact, its exterior cladding was made using wood reclaimed from an agricultural structure planned to be demolished. Related: Old Belgian barn is transformed into a gorgeous contemporary home The interior spaces are organized around a central core with bathrooms, storage spaces and utilities. Sliding doors open onto two exterior decks and blur the line between inside and outside. A rain screen made from reclaimed barn wood siding facilitates air circulation and keeps the house well ventilated. + DIGSAU Via Dezeen Photos by Todd Mason

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Vernacular-inspired Delaware home built with recycled barn wood

Biodesign Architecture Competition Extends Deadline to Sept 6th

August 31, 2016 by  
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Calling all future-forward architects and designers! How can we create buildings that heal themselves, ourselves, and the natural environment? Advances in synthetic biology, bio-printing, and material engineering have opened up a whole new field of Biodesign – and we’re giving away $1000 to the best project that integrates the natural world into the built environment. The winner of our Biodesign Competition will also be showcased to the X-Prize foundation as well as millions of Inhabitat readers around the world – and we’ve extended the deadline until September 6th , so enter today! The Fab Tree Hab living tree house concept by Mitchell Joachim, Javier Arbona and Lara Greden ENTER THE COMPETITION HERE > The X-Prize Foundation is a prestigious innovation engine that awards forward-thinking ideations for a better world. The winner of our Biodesign competition will get to display their work in front of the exemplary X-Prize board, including Larry Page, James Cameron, and Ariana Huffington. The winning Biodesign will be considered for entry in the new regenerative building X-Prize launching in April 2017. A combination of solar and wind power make Belgian architect Vincent Callebaut ‘s Dragonfly concept 100% self sufficient. We’re looking for applicants with “ bold and innovative visions for the future of construction at the intersection of the physical, the digital, and the biological. ” Will buildings be grown instead of assembled ? What would our buildings be like if they could grow to accommodate changes in their inhabitants or environment? What emerging material has the most potential for a biodesigned future? Mushroom Tower at MoMA PS1 museum in New York City – grown entirely form fungus Visions for the following categories will be considered: A. Spaces for living – Single family home in the suburbs – Multi-family apartment in the city – Informal settlement or slums in the context of an emerging economy – In situ revitalization of abandoned buildings in the context of cities with declining population B. Spaces for learning or healing DEADLINE We will be accepting entries through our online entry form , here , until 11:59 PST on September 6, 2016. *Entrants need to submit their designs in JPEG format (under 1MB) through the user upload form, but please note that all finalists will be asked to provide high-res 11X17 PDFs. Any entrant who wants to be considered for this prize should save all work as high resolution, vector files. ENTER THE COMPETITION HERE >

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Biodesign Architecture Competition Extends Deadline to Sept 6th

Beautiful brick ambulance station in the UK renovated as a cozy vacation home

August 2, 2016 by  
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The garage, named St John’s Rye, was built in the 1950s to house two ambulances. The architects remodeled the original structure and added on a two-story addition to complete a four-bedroom home perfect for big families and entertaining. Existing red brick is highlighted throughout the structure, as well as locally made clay peg tiles. Grey oak panels make up the flooring and walls of the staircase and bedrooms. Matching kitchen cabinetry is accompanied by small homages to the building’s original function, including a sleek stainless steel island. Painted white walls reflect light and do not steal away from the stunning wooden features, including the reclaimed beech wood dining table. Related: Gorgeous Enseada House is a breezy vacation home in Brazil The ground floor is centered around a concrete plinth, where a double-sided wood burning stove can be found. A dividing wall was removed to open up the kitchen, living room, and dining area. The two-story expansion holds a ground floor study and hallway, as well as a bedroom and bathroom, creating a spacious final touch on the remodeled home. + Marta Nowicka & Co. Via Dezeen Images via Vojteck Ketz

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Beautiful brick ambulance station in the UK renovated as a cozy vacation home

Hairy house stays cool in So Paulo with a palm fiber facade

July 22, 2016 by  
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This “hairy” house in Sao Paulo is covered in palm fiber to protect the interior from excessive sunlight. Brazilian brothers Fernando and Humberto Campana designed the house for Zunino and Solange Ricoy. The house takes cues from the country’s indigenous architecture and uses piassava palm fiber to regulate indoor temperatures and provide shelter from the tropical heat. The four-story house is located in Sao Paulo’s Jardim Paulista neighborhood. According to the architects, the structure was designed as “a vegetable that invades the house”. The interior continues the theme of organic materials , featuring leather and wood that brings warmth to the living spaces. The floor was built using reclaimed hardwood , while tall cacti and climbing figs cover parts of the exterior walls. A glass roof and terrace draw additional natural light into the volume of the house. Related: Gorgeous Green-Roofed Black Sheep House Looks Out to Sea “The house is very clean, so we created those elements to bring strong, organic emotion into the house and the facade,” said the architects. “We wanted to create something like a vegetable that goes from outside of the house to the inside.” + Campana Via Dezeen Photos by Leonardo Finotti

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Hairy house stays cool in So Paulo with a palm fiber facade

Obama targets 1 gigawatt of solar for lower income homes by 2020

July 22, 2016 by  
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The Obama Administration wants to make solar energy available to every American regardless of income. In that spirit, the White House just announced a partnership with six federal agencies – the Clean Energy Savings For All Initiative – to bring 1 gigawatt (GW) of solar to low- and moderate- income families by 2020. The goal is a tenfold increase over the president’s initial target set in his Climate Action Plan , which called for 100 megawatts (MW) of renewable energy on federally-assisted affordable housing by 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=141&v=uYhzg6XTOjY “Solar panels are no longer for wealthy folks who live where the sun shines every day. They are already a reality for Americans and communities all across the country,” Obama said in a video statement . “Today we’re offering even more families and communities the chance to choose cleaner sources of energy that save you money and protect the planet for all of us.” Related: Average cost of solar and wind energy could fall by 59% in the next decade The initiative involves the Departments of Energy (DOE), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Agriculture (USDA), Health and Human Services (HHS), Veteran’s Affairs (VA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). To achieve the administration’s 1 GW goal, the government plans to make it easier for homeowners to take advantage of the Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program that allows homeowners and veterans the opportunity to install solar panels and make energy efficiency improvements at no up-front cost, paying for solar and energy efficiency retrofits through future savings on energy bills. According to a fact sheet released by the White House, the initiative includes more than 120 new solar and energy efficiency commitments from the private, state, local and philanthropic sectors in 36 states. The commitments represent $287 million in investment and nearly 280 MW of community solar and low-and moderate income solar deployment. The White House said that the United States generates 30 times more solar power than eight years ago before the president took office and that the cost of solar energy systems has been reduced by more than 70 percent. The administration also said that the solar industry is adding jobs 12 times faster than the rest of the economy. Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has a plan to increase American solar power 700 percent by 2027. Clinton wants to deploy half a billion solar panels by the end of her first term and enough clean energy to provide electricity to every home in the United States within 10 years. Her opponent in the general election, Republican nominee Donald Trump, has shown a preference for fossil fuels over clean energy. Trump recently tapped a fossil fuels advocate as his energy adviser and is considering appointing someone from the fracking industry to be the nation’s next energy secretary. Via SeeNews Renewables Lead image via Wikipedia

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Obama targets 1 gigawatt of solar for lower income homes by 2020

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