This tiny home on stilts features an awesome secret patio

August 25, 2020 by  
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Known as LaLa’s Seaesta, this 410-square-foot tiny home located just blocks from the beach features reclaimed wood and a secret hidden patio. The home, designed by Texas-based Plum Construction, takes full advantage of its small stature with a dining nook that converts into a sleeping area and a swinging bed made from salvaged wooden doors. In addition to the 410 square feet of main living space, there is also an 80-square-foot interior loft accessible by ladder. The ladder to the loft was designed and built by Christine of Plum Construction and includes a closed system to stop it from falling and keep it flush against the wall while not in use. Christine also built and installed the beautiful wall treatment in the main bedroom that is made of old beadboard salvaged from a 100-year-old building in downtown Galveston. Related: This gorgeous tiny home features a greenhouse and wooden pergola The exterior is painted in a bold black hue, while the inside is soft pink, adding a unique contrast of tones. Inside, the dining nook and ottoman utilize custom upholstery, and the full kitchen contains custom Carrara marble countertops and a vintage-style refrigerator. This dining nook easily converts from a sitting area to a full-sized bed. The contemporary sofa, the centerpiece of the living room, was given a second life through reupholstering. Local artwork from a Galveston artist adorns the walls throughout the home, and the patio section has a painted mural inspired by a Brooklyn graffiti wall. The gable decoration in the front of the house is constructed from reclaimed cypress wood from a nearby house that dates back 120 years. The real hidden gem in this tiny home is the large patio underneath. It provides the occupant with a fun, bonus hangout space with ventilated slatted walls. The patio comes complete with several swings, a hammock, a bar, an outdoor shower for rinsing off after the beach, a sitting area, electrical outlets for a fan or watching TV and, of course, the lovely swinging bed made from two salvaged doors. Century-old reclaimed wood was also used in the construction of the bar and swings. LaLa’s Seaesta is available for rent on Airbnb . + Plum Construction Images via Plum Construction

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This tiny home on stilts features an awesome secret patio

Kudmai Collection repurposes vintage fishing boats into unique wood flooring

July 7, 2020 by  
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The Sacred Crafts, a San Diego-based brand focused on adding character to the home by sustainable methods, is giving new life to old wooden ships. The company’s new line, dubbed the Kudmai Collection after the Thai word for “reborn,” is a beautiful example of environmentally friendly reuse that also celebrates cultural history. Rather than creating new materials (and new waste), the company is dedicated to harvesting old materials that were once useful and meaningful for its pieces instead. The wood used for the Kudmai Collection comes from vintage and decommissioned Thailand boats, which have been retired from service and are no longer needed. Related: Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home The boats are deconstructed and the wood is designed for indoor flooring, but it can also be utilized for outdoor flooring and wall paneling with the proper treatment. Each plank is made of 4mm reclaimed ironwood and reclaimed acacia wood with an added base of 15mm sustainable eucalyptus plywood. Kudmai is available in three main colorways, which are customizable depending on needs and lifestyles. “Carbonized” uses a natural wood treatment that adds heat and pressure to enrich the wood’s natural minerals, meaning it doesn’t require staining and won’t change color over time. “Blonde” is the lightest of the three, with a subtle medium- to pale-yellow hue and a natural sheen that will help brighten a space. “Nude” provides a deeply rich, reddish-brown color with added warm vintage appeal. The flooring comes with a 10-year residential warranty and can ship to any country globally. There are two finishes available: low-sheen satin and high-gloss piano. While giving new life to materials that would otherwise become trash, the flooring also helps tell the stories of sailors and destinations that the fishing boats experienced throughout their service on the water. Because each piece of upcycled wood is unique in terms of age and seasoning, depending on its exposure, Kudamai floor boards become a true one-of-a-kind addition to any home. + The Sacred Crafts Images via The Sacred Crafts

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Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home

April 20, 2020 by  
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Costa Rican architectural firm Gussa has unveiled a peaceful eco-lodge located on the country’s beautiful Caribbean coastline. Esquina Verde is a cozy rental accommodation made out of locally sourced materials and reclaimed wood salvaged from a 100-year-old home. Surrounded by lush vegetation and native wildlife, the lodge’s multiple hammocks that hang from the thatched roofs make it an idyllic place to disconnect. Located just outside of Cahuita National Park in Limon, Esquina Verde is a serene retreat that provides park visitors with a place to stay while they explore the area. The indoor/outdoor nature of the two bedroom, two bathroom guest house lets guests completely immerse themselves in the tropical forest backdrop, which is home to some incredible wildlife. Related: Sustainable eco huts built on stilts in an idyllic French pine forest Inspired by the natural setting, the architects wanted the project to reflect and protect the environment. The first step was to repurpose loads of reclaimed wood that was salvaged from a 100-year-old home being demolished near the site. This timber was originally imported from the U.S. to be used in the island’s banana plantations. The rest of the lodge was almost entirely prefabricated off-site in San Jose. Once delivered to the lot, it was put together using a simple bolt system that held the steel frame in place. To protect the structure from the region’s infamous heavy rains and high humidity, the lodge incorporates several resilient design features. Esquina Verde has multiple connecting volumes, all of which are elevated off of the landscape to reduce the impact on the terrain . The lifted building also protects itself from flash flooding, which commonly occurs in this part of the country. The eco-lodge is arranged around a central courtyard with a small swimming pool. The main structure, which is two stories, features a wide thatched roof and a wrap-around porch, where guests can enjoy views of the lush tree canopy. Underneath the roof overhangs, floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors open up completely to provide air circulation and a deeper connection to the environment. + Gussa Images via Gussa

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Costa Rican eco-lodge is made of reclaimed wood from a 100-year-old home

Luxury resort in Bali pays homage to traditional village design

March 25, 2020 by  
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Already well-known for creating large-scale public works like eco-parks and museums, Dutch architectural practice OMA has added yet another stunning project to its impressive portfolio — a luxury resort in Seminyak, Bali. According to the architects, the inspiration behind the Desa Potato Head resort is the area’s traditional villages, and the resort’s layout recalls this through the use of traditional Balinese building techniques and reclaimed materials . Located on the beach, the beautiful eco-resort is unique in that it is not designed to be another luxurious but impersonal getaway, where tourists just lounge for hours, sipping on mixed drinks in the warm sunshine. Rather, the resort’s design is an architectural attempt to connect visitors to the local community’s traditions. Related: Reclaimed materials star in this surf villa with ocean views in Bali “The essence of Bali lies in the interaction between different cultures,” architect and OMA partner David Gianotten explained. “Our design for the Potato Head Studios offers both private guest rooms and facilities, and public spaces, to encourage exchange between different kinds of users, challenging the ubiquitous Balinese resort typology that paradoxically emphasizes hotel guests’ exclusive enjoyment, detached from the life of the local community.” As part of that strategy, the architects incorporated several traditional building techniques and materials into the resort’s construction. For example, the building’s elevated layout was inspired by the raised courtyards typically found throughout Indonesia. Made up of three large volumes, the complex is lifted off the ground by a series of thin columns. Guests can enjoy the spacious common areas that lead out to the beach or to the rooms via corridors of handmade breeze block walls that cast light and shadows in geometric patterns. Often used for celebrations and cultural events, this indoor/outdoor space is covered with extensive native vegetation , which creates a strong connection to Mother Nature. To take in the incredible views, guests can also make their way up to the massive rooftop terrace, which provides stunning, 360-degree views. With most of the work done by local craftsmen, much of the hotel consists of either recycled or reclaimed building materials. The cladding of the spacious courtyards and zigzagging walkways is comprised of cement casing and reclaimed wood boards. Additionally, local artisans handcrafted the resort’s woven ceilings from recycled plastic bottles . The private suites feature terrazzo flooring made from waste concrete. Decorations throughout the spaces include wood furnishings and artworks from various local artists. + Desa Potato Head + OMA Via Design Milk Photography by Kevin Mak via OMA

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Futuristic, seashell-inspired home is clad in reclaimed wood

February 3, 2020 by  
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Torino-based design studio Wafai Architecture has unveiled an incredible home design that is inspired by the organic shape of a simple seashell. With its tubular volume and light-inviting cutouts, the design for the Scandinavian Seashell Home was not only inspired by nature, but also counts on several sustainable features , such as reclaimed wood cladding, to reduce its environmental impact. The prolific studio’s founder, Abdul Sater Wafai, has become well-known for his spectacular house concepts that manage to combine the best of avant-garde design with sustainability. His concepts typically focus on organic and whimsical forms as well as an abundance of natural light. In fact, according to the architect, his preferred method of creating sustainable structures is to incorporate several passive features in lieu of high-priced bells and whistles. Related: Russian Seashell House has a 7-meter-tall stained glass window “Sustainability is great when achieved passively by design (passive cooling, natural light as needed, etc.) and not by an unaffordable technology,” Wafai explained to Design Wanted in a recent interview. This new concept, the Scandinavian Seashell House, is a tubular volume with various cutouts that let natural light stream into the interior. The elongated structure would be made out of glulam timber frames in order to create the curvaceous shape. The exterior would be clad in reclaimed wood salvaged from various resources. Cut in rounded pieces, the wood is in varying shades of gray, black and white for a patterned appearance that resembles fish scales. The curves continue throughout the interior, which is divided into three main spaces, all with minimalist appearances. The heart of the home contains the living room, kitchen and dining areas, all illuminated by a massive, circular window. Along with the abundance of natural light , these spaces and the bedrooms benefit from open cutouts on the ceiling that let outdoor hanging plants fall into the living areas, a unique feature that seamlessly connects the house with its surroundings. Walking into a central courtyard through large sliding glass doors, future residents will be able to enjoy a private outdoor space. The patio contains a circular swimming pool as well as an outdoor dining and entertaining area. + Wafai Architecture Images via Wafai Architecture

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Chic B&B in New South Wales is inside a shed made of upcycled materials

December 4, 2019 by  
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Australia was recently voted the destination of the year for 2020 . If you are thinking about going down under for a vacation, make sure to check out this beautiful B&B located in a shed in New South Wales. Made almost entirely from upcycled materials , The Shed is an old machinery shed that has been converted into a unique, eco-friendly accommodation. Guests to The Shed will take comfort in not only staying in a unique hotel but also one that has been crafted from reclaimed materials. Walking into the spacious living area through a set of vintage doors, guests will find that the building materials, such as reclaimed wood and timber ceiling beams, were left exposed. Related: These enchanting, off-grid cabins are handcrafted from salvaged materials The living space of the fun hotel consists of a large lounge area with vintage sofas centered around a fireplace. An open kitchen with a breakfast bar comes with all of the typical amenities. A family-style dining table provides a great place for everyone to gather around and eat or play games together. The Shed sleeps up to seven guests among its three bedrooms. Two of the bedrooms have spacious, king-sized beds, while the third room is home to bunk beds. The full bathroom has a free-standing bathtub, a walk-in shower, a sink and a toilet. There is also a half bathroom. Just over two hours away from the NSW capital , Sydney, the Shed is set on an idyllic plot of land with chickens and an herb garden. Visitors can enjoy dining al fresco in the outdoor dining area, which comes complete with a barbecue grill and a pizza oven. The location offers all types of activities for nature-lovers, including hiking and biking trails. + Glamping Hub Images via Glamping Hub

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Chic B&B in New South Wales is inside a shed made of upcycled materials

Cedar Haven is a forest retreat made with reclaimed logs

December 3, 2019 by  
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Blending contemporary design with natural materials, Washington-based residential architecture firm Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture completed a stunning timber home that feels like an extension of its alpine forest environment. Created for a homeowner who wanted a residence that echoed the tranquility of its mountain surroundings, the aptly named Cedar Haven was built mainly from timber and stone — much of which was reclaimed from the site itself. Several salvaged logs and other found objects from the surroundings were deliberately left in their natural state to emphasize the organic beauty of the design. Located on a site where a previous log home once stood, Cedar Haven was created in response to the client’s desire for a more contemporary house that still exuded the warm, rustic feel of a traditional log cabin . The result is a stunning, custom home that features a dramatic, light-filled great room with a massive stone fireplace, a sculptural spiral staircase and custom, handcrafted details throughout. The natural materials palette and large windows — particularly those in the double-height great room — blur the boundary between indoors and out. Related: A traditional log cabin in Colorado is the perfect winter wonderland retreat “The Cedar Haven project draws inspiration from the surrounding natural beauty,” the architects explained in a project statement. “Inside, vertical lines and artful asymmetry mimic the forest outside the soaring great room window. A staircase of spiraling posts echoes a grove of trees , and a colorful petrified stump captures the attention of all who enter.” In addition to the petrified stump, reclaimed wood is used for statement design pieces in the home. Cedar trunks act as eye-catching pillars inside and outside of the house, while a twisted tree trunk frames one of the three stone fireplaces. Reclaimed stones were also used to build the fireplaces and chimneys. + Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture Photography by Benjamin Benschneider via Gelotte Hommas Drivdahl Architecture

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Reclaimed NYC water towers are upcycled into a NEST playscape in Brooklyn

June 28, 2019 by  
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A giant NEST has landed on the roof of the Brooklyn Children’s Museum (BCM) — and it’s not for the birds. Brooklyn-based design and fabrication practice TRI-LOX created NEST, the museum’s new interactive playscape built out of reclaimed timber from the city’s rooftop water towers. Designed with parametric tools, the sustainable installation takes inspiration from the unique nests of the baya weaver birds — their nests are featured in the museum’s educational collection — and comprises an organic woven landscape with 1,800 square feet of space for open and creative play. Opened just in time for summer, the NEST playscape at the Brooklyn Children’s Museum (BCM) in Crown Heights caters to children ages 2 to 8. The woven wooden landscape is set on artificial turf and includes a climbable exterior and a series of ribbed tunnels and rooms that make up a permeable interior with entrances marked by bright blue paint. The reclaimed cedar slats not only make the structure easy to climb, but also partially obscure views for added playfulness. The top of the structure is crowned with a circular hammock area that directs views up toward the sky. “In exploring the museum’s educational collection, we came upon a series of incredible bird nests and let them inspire our design,” said ?Alexander Bender?, co-founder and managing partner of TRI-LOX, which was commissioned by BCM through a request for proposals in mid-2017. “One nest in particular, made by the baya weaver bird, offers an intricately woven form with rooms, tunnels and multiple entries. This concept was then transformed into a climbable playscape that retains the natural materiality of the nest and tells a story of an iconic design within our vertical urban habitat — the NYC rooftop wood water tower. We quite literally brought the water tower back to the rooftop with this project … it just had to be turned into a giant nest first.” Related: The Brooklyn Children’s Museum’s new green roof lets kids explore the wilderness in the middle of the city NEST playscape is the newest focal point for the BCM, which consists of a series of architecturally significant designs befitting its title as the world’s first children’s museum. Rafael Viñoly designed the museum’s eye-catching yellow building in 2008. Seven years later, Toshiko Mori added a pavilion on the 20,000-square-foot rooftop that was complemented with lush planting plan and a boardwalk by Future Green Studio in 2017. + TRI-LOX Photography by Arion Doerr via TRI-LOX

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This gorgeous LEED Platinum winery is made of reclaimed wood

March 20, 2019 by  
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San Francisco-based firm Piechota Architecture has designed what is being called the most sustainable winery in Sonoma Valley. Tucked into the rolling hills of Alexander Valley, the solar-powered Silver Oak winery design, which was made with repurposed materials, has already earned a LEED-Platinum certification  and is on track to become the one of the world’s most sustainable wineries. The family-owned Silver Oak Cellars winery was established in 1972 and has since become world-renowned for its award-winning Cabernet Sauvignon. The winery’s first location is located in the Napa Valley town of Oakville. The company’s second winery, designed by Daniel Piechota , is located on an expansive 113-acre estate and 75 acres of prime Cabernet Sauvignon vineyards in Alexander Valley. Related: LEED-seeking winery in Uruguay is built almost entirely of locally sourced materials With its low-lying gabled farmhouse silhouette, the winery appears low-key from afar; however, behind the clean lines, charred timber cladding and minimalist forms lies a powerhouse of sustainability. According to the architects, the design of the winery applies the concept of “reduce, reuse, recycle” through various sustainable features. For energy generation, the winery has an extended roof installed with more than  2,500 solar panels , which generate 100 percent of the building’s energy needs. The design uses plenty of recycled materials, but the reclaimed wood was specifically chosen to pay homage to the area’s wine-making industry. The winery’s exterior is clad in wood panels taken from 1930s wine tanks from Cherokee Winery, one of the valley’s pioneers of wine-making. Additionally, the design incorporated charred panels recovered from Middletown trees that were naturally felled during a fire in the valley in 2015. Now, the blacked trunks and panels have been given new life as a modern, sleek facade for the  winery . Inside, visitors are met with a large entry staircase, also built out of reclaimed wood from oak wine barrels with red wine stains that were intentionally left visible. The rest of the welcoming interior is a light-filled space filled with steel and wood features. Visitors will be able to take part in wine tasting in the winery’s tasting room, which is nearly net-zero water. With a calming reflective pool, native vegetation and open-air seating, this area is the heart of the design. Created to mimic the local barn vernacular, the gabled roof and large cutouts provide beautiful framed views of the rolling hillside that surrounds the estate. Of course, as with every winery, water plays an essential role in Silver Oak’s production. To reduce waste, the winery was installed with a state-of-the-art water reclamation system, including a membrane bioreactor that treats and filters water from the cellar to provide potable water. Rainwater is harvested and collected to be used in the vineyard’s irrigation. + Daniel Piechota Via Dezeen Photography by Joe Fletcher via Daniel Piechota

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This home gently wraps around towering 80-year-old coconut trees

November 27, 2018 by  
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Bombay-based firm  Abraham John Architects deftly crafted a beautiful home to carefully sit near 19 80-year-old coconut trees. The massive, 6,500-square-foot private residence is broken up into various fragmented volumes, taking on a small village feel that gives the home its name, Villa in the Palms. According to the architects, the unique layout was essential in ensuring that not a single tree was felled during the building process. To build the home around the trees, the architects created a unique, fragmented layout, reminiscent of a traditional Goan Village. Additionally, the team used traditional Goan building techniques and materials in the project. The exterior walls are clad in resilient laterite stone, giving the home an earthy aspect that blends it into the natural surroundings while providing a strong thermal envelope. Also climate-inspired are the pitched roofs that slope at different angles to harvest rainwater and withstand strong winds during monsoon season. Related: A modern, energy-efficient home is built around a beloved madrone tree The home is broken up into several individual spaces, which are connected by various outdoor decks, passages and bridges that wind through the trees, pools and gardens. The main living area provides stunning views of the gardens. The room is flooded with natural light through a large skylight that also provides sun for the interior garden. To blend the home further into its natural setting, the outer frame was installed with large screens made out of 100-year-old reclaimed teak wood . The living space, kitchen and dining room all look out over the pool, which is comprised of three distinct bodies of water covered with teak-wood bridges and little islands that were built to protect the existing trees .  This area also opens up to the natural gardens of lush greenery and, of course, the towering palm trees. + Abraham John Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Alan Abraham via Abraham John Architects

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