Dilapidated garage turned into gorgeous tiny art studio

August 14, 2018 by  
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When artist Sue Prue moved in with her boyfriend, she decided to make full use of an old, run-down garage in the backyard by turning it into a tiny studio . The 270-square-foot space was compact, to say the least, but with a little design savvy, the ambitious couple managed to create a gorgeous, light-filled art space. Although the initial plan was to renovate the old garage in the backyard, it was in a sad state – beyond repair and full of rats. These issues prompted the design duo to demolish the old structure completely. Inspired by the Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU) trend in the area, Sue worked with specialists in ADU design to create a new tiny space that would meet her needs. Related: Former chicken coop transformed into a backyard artist’s studio in Berlin At just 270 square feet, the studio is quite compact, but it’s also big on style. The exterior of the structure is clad in a neutral beige siding with olive-hued trim. A pleasant sitting area surrounds the entrance, creating a seamless connection between the indoor and outdoor space. A set of double glass doors lead into the white-walled interior.  Concrete flooring , natural light and exposed wooden beams give the space a fresh, modern aesthetic. The interior is designed to be as space-efficient and sustainable as possible. It includes the reclaimed wood wall in the kitchen, which also has plenty of space for storage. The ornate black-and-white tile in the bathroom provides another artistic touch. As an experienced Art Director, the Berkeley-based Prue has a keen eye for design. In an interview with Apartment Therapy, she reveals that she filled the space focusing on a design theme that was “happy, colorful, modern, [and] mid-century-esque.” She found many of the items at flea markets, while others are more upscale purchases. + Sue Prue Via Apartment Therapy Images via Sue Prue

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Dilapidated garage turned into gorgeous tiny art studio

This family tiny home is built from recycled materials and reclaimed wood

July 25, 2018 by  
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Tiny homes have been in the limelight for several years, but what makes Margo and Eric Puffenberger’s custom-built tiny house unique is the many recycled materials that were sourced from their family members. Throughout the Puffenberger tiny home, you’ll find wood from Margo’s grandparents and sister, shelves made from her great-great-grandmother’s buffet and windows and a door from her old, demolished elementary school. Building the nearly 190-square-foot house was prompted by a casual car conversation. The 4- and 6-year-old kids, Avery and Bennett, loved the idea, and the rest is history. First, the couple bought a used 16-foot trailer with a 10,000-pound towing capacity. Margo sketched out the floor plans, and construction for the tiny home began. The couple chose cedar siding  for the exterior based on its light-weight and low-maintenance qualities as well as how lovely it ages. A durable standing seam roof complements the cedar. Plenty of windows provide natural ventilation and light — some windows were retrieved from the now-defunct elementary school. The bathroom door was also salvaged from the school and glides like a barn door. The couple designed screened window systems that hook open from the inside encourage air flow while discouraging bugs from coming into the home. Related: A couple turns a Mercedes Sprinter into a solar-powered home on wheels The tiny home’s walls are covered in white oak and beechwood salvaged from the grandparents’ corn crib. This wood was also used to build sleeping and storage lofts as well as kitchen counters, the shower basin cabinet, trim and half of the floors — the remainder is tongue-and-groove maple flooring salvaged from Margo’s sister’s old farmhouse . The kitchen cupboards are crafted from her great-great-grandmother’s buffet. Eric designed and built a couch with a fold-out bed and window seat that converts into a dining table. The Puffenbergers hit their goal of completing the project in less than two years. Just this month, the family traveled from Ohio to Colorado with their home in tow, and it was a family adventure they’ll cherish for a lifetime. Via Tiny House Talk Images via Margo Puffenberger

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This family tiny home is built from recycled materials and reclaimed wood

Minimalism adds a modern twist to this traditional farmhouse

July 25, 2018 by  
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Columbus-based practice Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design took cues from early 19th-century agrarian architecture for its design of the Sullivan House, a contemporary residence that comprises two gabled barn-like structures. Located in the leafy Ohio suburb of Worthington, this single-family home offers a modern take on the local farmhouse vernacular with its simple form clad in natural materials and large expanses of glass. Completed in June 2016, the Sullivan House is a spacious residence placed on a high point of a three-acre wooded lot upslope from a deep ravine. The two-story home was built on the remaining foundations of a previous house and covers an area of 3,500 square feet. The entrance and the main rooms of the house — including an open-plan living area, dining space and kitchen — are on the upper level, and a glazed connector separates them from a private wing housing the master suite and two bedrooms. A small loft space with an en suite bedroom is tucked above the living space. The lower level houses the garage, guest room, play room and storage with laundry. The main level of the Sullivan House is wrapped in Shou Sugi Ban set atop a base of rough limestone. The gabled roofs are sheathed in natural slate shingles with a terne metal standing seam skirt. The use of natural materials helps to blend the home into its forested surroundings, while large sliding glass panels and outdoor entertaining areas — a dining patio on the lower level and a large dining terrace on the main floor — emphasize indoor-outdoor living. Related: A Michigan farmhouse is reborn as a beautiful modern vacation retreat “The project formally references the farm structures common to the area at the time of its first settlement in the early 19th century,” said Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design in its project statement. “The minimalist expression of this reference creates a strong and clear aesthetic — the basic structure and iconic form are primary.” + Jonathan Barnes Architecture and Design Images by Brad Feinknopf

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Minimalism adds a modern twist to this traditional farmhouse

Brooklyn’s new Domino Park features relics from the old sugar factory

June 8, 2018 by  
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Prolific landscape architecture firm  James Corner Field Operations  has managed to transform many desolate areas with its amazing park designs, but perhaps its crowning achievement will be Brooklyn’s Domino Park. Set to open to the public on June 10, the park — which was installed with reclaimed relics from the former Domino Sugar Refinery — has been converted into a quarter-mile long stretch of open green space running along the Williamsburg waterfront. Working with Brooklyn-based Two Trees Management, James Corner Field Operations (the lead architects on the beloved High Line park in Manhattan) has taken great care to convert the former industrial area into a welcoming public green space for the Williamsburg neighbors. The stretch of land from Grand Street to South Fifth Street has been desolate for years, its vacant lots blocked to visitors with chain-link fences. Now, after an extensive renovation to create a community-tailored recreational area, the project is ready to welcome the public. Related: Abandoned Lot Turned into Public Farm and Mountain Bike Course in Brooklyn First and foremost, the master plan for the park’s design included a strong emphasis on historic preservation. Reclaimed sugar refining and industrial materials, as well as various timber pieces, are just some of the relics  salvaged from the factory and placed in the park to pay homage to its origins. The 1,200-foot-long waterfront esplanade runs the length of the east bank of the East River, providing visitors with incredible panoramic views of the Manhattan skyline and the Williamsburg Bridge. For those looking to simply sit and enjoy the surrounding views, there are plenty of benches around the park, which were also made out of reclaimed wood from the factory. The park’s expansive green space  is separated into two areas, a passive zone and an active zone. For those looking for a relaxing day at the park, there is an urban beach where visitors can soak up the sun on lounge chairs. A Japanese Pine garden leads into an open lawn with a designated 100-person picnic area and a large playground. For those who love to be active, there is a full-sized volleyball court, two boccie courts, and a 6,300-square-foot playing field. Dogs are also welcome to stretch their legs in the spacious dog run. At the heart of the park is a central gathering space, “Water Square.” Like most of the firm’s work, the greenery found throughout the park includes various sustainable plantings, as well as a mix of local and exotic foliage, flowers and trees. A four-tiered seating area with a water fountain provides visitors with a meeting place to enjoy the incredible views. Next to the wooden seating, four salvaged syrup tanks from the refinery were installed as a whimsical “Syrup Tank Garden.” Overlooking the park is an elevated, five-block long walkway. “Artifact Walk” is made from various pieces of salvaged factory equipment, such as steel columns, crane tracks and tall cylindrical tanks. During the ambitious project, Hurricane Sandy forced the planners to put resilience at the forefront of the design. Accordingly, the park is raised above the 100-year flood elevation levels and pushed back 100 feet from the water’s edge. + James Corner Field Operations + Two Trees Management Via Architectural Digest Images via Two Trees Management

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Brooklyn’s new Domino Park features relics from the old sugar factory

Parsons School of Design unveils sustainable public seating in New York City

May 21, 2018 by  
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Leave it to the creative minds at the Parsons School of Design to renovate public seating for a more eco-friendly world. The school recently unveiled Street Seats, a sustainably-designed public seating area made from repurposed and biodegradable products for New Yorkers to find respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. The public space, which the school unveiled this week, was inspired by the need to create more seating areas for people to relax and take a load off. In a place like New York City , public seating can be quite limited. Students from the school’s architecture, interior design, product design, and food studies departments envisioned and built Street Seats over two parking spaces on the corner of 13th street and 5th Avenue in Greenwich Village. The students crafted the space with a variety of reclaimed materials . They used rot-resistant western red cedar to build tables and stools, which were then covered in repurposed fishing nets . Related: DIY Softwalks Kits Let You Turn Ugly Scaffolding into Fun Pop-Up Parks! The lighting system in the installation is completely off-grid and operates on solar energy . After sunset, a daylight sensor activates LED lights to provide a well-lit atmosphere. The seating area is surrounded by planters to reduce traffic noise and create a pleasant environment. The planters are made with biodegradable coconut fibers and jet webbing  and house herbs and native plants. The Greenbelt Native Plant Center donated seeds for the project. + Parsons New School of Design Images by Rafael Flaksburg via Parsons New School of Design

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Couple converts $7,000 Joshua Tree cabin into a sophisticated desert oasis

April 19, 2018 by  
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When Kathrin and Brian Smirke decided to buy an abandoned property in the desert landscape of Joshua Tree for $7,000, they knew that they had a massive undertaking on their hands. The old cabin , which dated back to 1957, had been left rotting in the desert for years. But with a lot of vision and hard work, the ambitious duo converted the 480-square-foot homestead into a beautiful desert oasis. The couple chronicled the massive renovation project they lovingly call “The Shack Attack” on their blog, We Are in Our Element . The poor state of the structure meant gutting the interior down to the base boards to start fresh. Over a period of two years, the couple revamped the cabin into a beautiful desert home. “We spent over a year planning, demolishing, building, planning again, building, and then finally decorating this little gem,” Kathrin explains. “What makes this home special is that we did a lot of the work ourselves, including the design, complete demolition, framing, plumbing, trim electrical, and we even built a lot of the interior fixtures and art.” Related: Stunning Lucid Stead Cabin Reflects the Colors and Movements of the Mojave Desert The process was quite detailed, with the Smirkes focused on reducing the project’s footprint at every turn. They also had to deal with several building restrictions included in the sale of the property, namely not being allowed to increase the square footage of the structure. Nevertheless, they were determined to fit a comfortable living room, kitchen, full bathroom, and bedroom that would accommodate a king-size bed into the compact space . Using various reclaimed materials, they converted the space into a light-filled home. Large sliding glass doors in the entrance and the bedroom open the interior up to incredible views as well as an abundance of natural light. Additionally, they managed to salvage some materials from the original building – Brian created a few decorative pieces by repurposing timber from the original structure. In the kitchen, Kathrin and Brian formed and poured the concrete countertops themselves and made the floating shelves out of leftover clear pine and plywood. At the back of the home is a compact sleeping area that fits a comfortable king-size platform bed. Again, multiple windows in the room add a light and airy touch to the small space. To take full advantage of the desert landscape , the couple put a lot of work into creating a seamless connection between the interior and the exterior. A large covered porch offers stunning views. But, without a doubt, the heart of the project is the outdoor bathtub, an old water trough painted white. Surrounded by a wooden deck, this is the ultimate space for relaxing while the desert sun sets. The Shack Attack is available to rent via Airbnb throughout the year. + We Are in Our Element Via Dwell Images via We Are in Our Element

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Couple converts $7,000 Joshua Tree cabin into a sophisticated desert oasis

Architects create exquisite home addition out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone

January 2, 2018 by  
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Montana-based JLF Architects recently updated a gorgeous home in Jackson Hole with a spacious addition built out of reclaimed barn wood and local stone. The home design is straight out of a fairy tale, with rustic wood paneling and a glass-enclosed interior walkway leading from one end of the existing structure to its new extension. The home is located deep in the Teton Pines community, surrounded by thick forest. The homeowners were looking to add space to host visiting family during the summer and holidays, but they wanted to retain the existing home’s aesthetic. Working with local firm, Big-D Signature , JLF Architects created a design that would enhance the home’s size, but without sacrificing its beautiful rustic character. Related: Dilapidated 1800s dairy barn resurrected into a stunning home in Wyoming According to the architects, the design was focused on extending the original design rather than adding on an independent addition, “Our design-build approach allowed our team to look at the design of this home holistically to create continuity and quality within the architecture,” explains JLF Architects principal Logan Leachman. To find the appropriate materials, the architects searched various local log yards for reclaimed timber and stone that would match the original structure. Luckily, they found Montana moss rock and rough-sawn fir panels as well as 20th-century chestnut hardwood floors, all of which were used in the construction of the 700-square-foot addition. To connect the old space with the new addition, partners Big-D Signature crafted a beautiful glass entryway that connects the two structures. The glass walls allow for natural light to flood the interior and provides some seriously stunning views of the natural surroundings. The walkway is bookended by two stone walls that, along with the glass and timber passageway, brings the exterior into the interior. + JLF Architects + Big-D Signature

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This Mexico City home is built around a gorgeous vertical garden

November 28, 2017 by  
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The verdant Villa Jardín in Mexico City uses vegetation to unify its indoor and outdoor spaces. Architecture firm ASP Arquitectura Sergio Portillo introduced terraces, pergolas and an entire room packed with greenery to this apartment occupying the lower level of a residential building in Mexico City. The result is an exotic home that draws nature inside. The naturally ventilated apartment features a series of outdoor spaces that interact with the indoors through semi-private areas. Two terraces joined by a pergola occupy the northeast side, which features a lush vertical garden made of wooden boxes reclaimed from the shoring system used during the construction process. Related: Apostrophy’s gorgeous Bangkok townhouse boasts a 25-foot vertical garden The second terrace sits on a lower overhang and offers a direct connection to level below. A more private garden located in the southwest part of the home. This green space connects to the bedrooms, TV room and kitchen, and ultimately leads to the Garden Box – a modular space designed for contemplation. + ASP Arquitectura Sergio Portillo Via v2com Photos by Rafael Gamo

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This Mexico City home is built around a gorgeous vertical garden

Ultra-narrow Wood Lane house looks like a ship wedged between Londons brick buildings

November 28, 2017 by  
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This narrow house , home of architect Mike Russum , looks like a ship wedged in-between traditional brick townhouses in north London . The architect maximized the potential of the 22-foot wide plot by inverting the conventional layout used in tiny spaces and combining prefab building methods with site-built construction. The house, named Wood Lane, has been long-listed for the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) House of the Year award. Russum and his partner decided to build their home after they inherited some money in 2006. It took nearly a decade to get over various hold-ups to complete the building. Located on an extremely narrow plot–only 22 feet wide– the project required a creative organizational approach. Related: Super skinny 1.8-meter-wide house slots into a narrow Tokyo lot The architects extended the upper floors out towards the pavement. The structure was constructed off-site and placed them on top of the lower section, which was built from bricks infilled with concrete and supported by steel beams. The double-height living space on the upper floors contains an open plan space with combined kitchen, dining and living space with an elevated crystalline conservatory on the south side and an external terrace above the entrance. The elements for the living space are made by cold formed timber and resin boat building technology which ensures quality and space efficient construction. The upper ground floor houses the study that opens to a full-width terrace overlooking the garden. Two en-suite bedrooms occupy the lower ground floor. All the furniture is custom-designed by Birds Portchmouth Russum , working together with the architect’s wife, interior designers, and artist Sally Cox. The nautical look of the building makes it stand out from the surrounding architecture and stop passersby in their tracks. The residence also featured on the Channel 4 series Grand Designs: House of the Year. + Birds Portchmouth Russum Architects + RIBA House of the Year 2017 Via The Telegraph

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Ultra-narrow Wood Lane house looks like a ship wedged between Londons brick buildings

Dwell Development introduces net zero-ready homes to Seattles Georgetown neighborhood

November 6, 2017 by  
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Green home builder  Dwell Development  is taking Seattle by storm! After completing several stunning net-zero projects, including this 5-Star Built Green home in Mount Baker , the company has unveiled another two  energy-efficient homes nestled in Georgetown, one of Seattle’s oldest and most eclectic neighborhoods. Both residences feature 12-inch thick walls for optimal thermal insulation, solar-ready rooftop configurations, electric vehicle charging units, and triple-glazed windows. Thanks to these sustainable features, the homes are now targeting 5-star Built Green certification and net zero , highest levels of green building certification. Each is 2500 square feet and includes three bedrooms, two and a half bathrooms, alley access to a two-car garage and an open-plan layout that maximizes the amount of natural light . Related: Ultra-green house in Seattle marries aesthetics and sustainability The architects drew inspiration from the industrial aesthetic of the neighborhood and its manufacturing tradition. The open-plan layout references airplane hangars, while reclaimed wood accents on the exterior façade act as a nod to the warehouse typology still present in Georgetown. + Dwell Development Photos by Tucker English

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