The Cornelia tiny house is a peaceful writer’s studio built with reclaimed wood

April 20, 2018 by  
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One of the best things to come from the tiny home  trend is the peace of living in a quiet atmosphere – which is especially important for writers. At the request of renowned children’s author Cornelia Funke,  New Frontier Tiny Homes  created The Cornelia — which is just 24 feet in length and 8.5 feet wide. Funke’s tiny house is a serene three-in-one space that can be used as a writing studio, a guest house and a library. The Cornelia’s high vaulted ceilings provide the tiny house with plenty of vertical space. Abundant windows provide plenty of natural light and stunning views of the surrounding forest. Reclaimed barn wood covers the walls and ceilings, giving the home an inviting cabin feel. A small deck is covered with a wooden awning, creating a serene spot to enjoy the outdoors. Related: Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels The designers customized the layout of the compact space  to fit Funke’s needs. High ledges span the length of both walls to provide ample space for storing books. Minimal furnishings open up the space and keep it safe from clutter. The desk, which is located under a large window, can be folded down when not in use. A small, incredibly space-efficient kitchen is located on one end of the home and the bathroom is located in a corner of the living space. The loft, which fits a king-size bed, is accessible by a movable ladder. The efficient, modern design and lush surroundings offer plenty of inspiration for the tiny home’s creative inhabitant. + New Frontier Tiny Homes Via Apartment Therapy Images via New Frontier Tiny Homes

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The Cornelia tiny house is a peaceful writer’s studio built with reclaimed wood

This light-filled tiny house is made almost entirely of reclaimed wood

November 9, 2017 by  
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Proving that repurposed materials can be used to create gorgeous design, this 26-foot-long Legacy tiny home is made almost entirely from reclaimed wood . New Hampshire-based builders Wood & Heart designed the house with a compact yet sophisticated living area enhanced by an abundance of natural light thanks to three large skylights. From the exterior to the interior, the tiny space was designed to offer all of the comforts of a “regular” home. The structure is clad in cedar wood siding that contrasts nicely with Shou Sugi Ban -style charred cedar trim, giving the home a nice rustic feel. Related: The minimalist Yoshino Cedar House was built entirely out of locally-sourced timber Wood accents line the interior – including black walnut and African mahogany counter tops, 3? solid hardwood oak flooring, floating black walnut shelves and a wooden dining table. Covering the space is a ceiling made entirely from rough-sawn planks of reclaimed timber. Three large skylights and 13 Andersen windows provide the space with plenty of natural light . The living space is warm and comfy, with a sleeping loft and full-size pull-out sofa for guests. The kitchen, although compact, has enough space to make a nice meal with a four-burner stovetop and a 24-inch ceramic farmhouse sink. Of course, ample storage space is found throughout the home. Wooden planks cover the length of the interior’s flooring until the bathroom, where honeycomb geometric tiles take over. The bathroom was also built with a reclaimed accent wall. The Legacy, which can be hauled on any standard trailer, is currently on sale for $85,000 including all of the furniture, appliances and decor. + Wood & Heart Building Co. Via New Atlas Images via Wood & Heart Building Co.

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This light-filled tiny house is made almost entirely of reclaimed wood

Light-filled timber home is a modern zen haven in Seattle

July 18, 2017 by  
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How do you combine countryside tranquility with urban style? MW|Works Architecture+Design strikes a thoughtful balance in Helen Street, a beautiful modern home with handsome craftsmanship and careful attention to detail. Filled with light and views of the landscape, this lovely Seattle home is built largely of wood, from the heavy reclaimed timber cladding to the naturally weathered cedar plank roof. Helen Street was commissioned by clients who had been living on a rural property east of Seattle but found themselves drawn back to the vibrancy of city life. Thus, the architects were tasked to create a home with a smaller footprint than the client’s former house that still retained the peaceful setting of the countryside as well as easy indoor/outdoor living. The new-build is located on an urban corner lot in the walkable Madison Valley neighborhood next to Washington Park Arboretum , and comfortably houses the two clients and their two dogs. Related: Shapeshifting Tent House blurs the line between indoor and outdoor spaces A courtyard is located at the heart of the home, bringing natural light and greenery deep in the interior. “Territorial view corridors helped identify where the building could be very transparent and where privacy was more important,” wrote the architects. “The material palette was simple with a largely glassy main level with solid volumes crisply detailed in cement panels.” Naturally weathered cedar planks clad the roof plane and master suite, while stacked and blackened reclaimed timber clad the exterior. + MW|Works Architecture+Design Images by Andrew Pogue

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Light-filled timber home is a modern zen haven in Seattle

Gorgeous Japanese-inspired reading nook breathes new life into a Frank Gehry-designed home

June 16, 2017 by  
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A slice of reading heaven has been inserted into this Frank Gehry -designed home in Los Angeles’ Sawtelle Japantown. Local studio Dan Brunn Architecture gutted and renovated the 1970s house named Hide Out with a minimalist aesthetic that pays homage to Gehry’s original design. Commissioned by a pair of art collectors, the stylish home disrupts its art gallery-like feel with large walnut surfaces that add warmth and even carve out an enviable reading nook by the garden. Formerly owned by the Janss Family, the 3,600-square-foot Hide Out house was overhauled to create an open-air area on the first floor for displaying the work of the new owner, artist James Jean. Since the Janss Family discarded some of Gehry’s signature details in the original construction of the home, Dan Brunn Architecture used the renovation as an opportunity to bring back those lost architectural details. In addition to the oversized rectangular skylight in the center of the home—the only major architectural detail from Gehry’s design that the Janss retained—the architects added dynamic shapes and a simple material palette typical of Gehry’s style in the 1970s and 1980s. The renovated Hide Out features a simple material palette of walnut , concrete, and glass and is filled with natural light from the rectangular skylight and new glazed openings. White walls and pale concrete floors are broken up by eye-catching walnut surfaces, such as the handcrafted and beautifully sculptural walnut staircase at the heart of the home. The open-plan layout is decorated with minimal furnishings to keep focus on the art. Related: How Frank Gehry’s provocative designs go from concept to reality In reference to the home’s surroundings in the Little Osaka neighborhood, the architects drew inspiration from Japanese design for multiple aspects of the home, including furnishing. The reclaimed timber coffee table, for instance, was custom made with traditional Japanese joinery. Traditional Japanese tearooms provided inspiration for an inserted walnut volume that functions as a reading nook, meeting space, or meditation room. The room overlooks a garden planted with traditional Japanese species of bamboo, gingko, and maple. + Dan Brunn Architecture Via Dezeen Images © Brandon Shigeta

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Gorgeous Japanese-inspired reading nook breathes new life into a Frank Gehry-designed home

Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

June 15, 2017 by  
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A perfect getaway surrounded by nature is hidden away near the town of Woodstock. UK-based Antony Gibbon Designs crafted this blissful retreat, called Inhabit Treehouse, that’s nestled within dense forest less than a two-hour drive from New York City. Built from locally and sustainably sourced reclaimed timber , Inhabit treehouse offers beautiful and cozy digs with stunning views of a lake and the Catskills mountain range beyond. Built for a family with plans of opening the treehouse up to rentals, Inhabit Treehouse is a small and efficiently designed space with all the comforts of home. FSC-certified reclaimed cedar sourced from the Catskills valley clads the treehouse , while FSC-certified reclaimed pine lines the interior. The timber facade will develop an attractive patina over time to help the building blend into the landscape. Large windows open the treehouse up to natural light and views of the outdoors. Guests can also reconnect with nature from the two balconies on either side of the building. The treehouse interior comprises an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room with a wood-burning stove ; a spacious loft bedroom; shower and bathroom; and a second bedroom in the rear that could easily be transformed into an office. A large terrace beneath the treehouse leads down to the lake and a hot tub. Related: Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams “Inhabit Treehouse contrasts geometric forms against the organic forms of the forest but still blends into the surroundings with its timber materials,” Antony Gibbons told Inhabitat. “New trees were also planted close to the structure to help strengthen the idea that the building cuts through the forest and is semi-camouflaged into its surroundings. The sharp geometric angles of the Interior also created an interesting layout that pushed away from 90 degree corners as much as possible.” + Antony Gibbons Design Images via Antony Gibbons Design

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Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

Single cypress tree grows through a Los Angeles hillside home

October 31, 2016 by  
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Elevated off the ground and into foliage like a treehouse, The House in the Trees is cantilevered over a steep hillside and overlooks views of the valley. The 2,400-square-foot single-story building is wrapped in fire-treated Western red cedar siding and topped with an angled steel roof. The use of timber on the facade—and in the interior in the form of walnut cabinetry and reclaimed chestnut floors—helps the building blend into its wooded environment. Related: Contemporary ski chalet boasts gorgeous panoramic views and a low-energy footprint Large windows pour natural light into the interior, which is split into two portions: a two-bedroom main unit and a secondary unit with a kitchen, living room, office, extra bedroom, and bathroom. A wooden deck wraps around the living area to extend the building footprint to the outdoors. The mature cypress tree that grows through the home is exposed in the bedroom. “Waterproofing a tree in this situation proved to be very challenging but the system works to keep water out of the house,” write the architects. + Anonymous Architects Via Dezeen Images via Anonymous Architects

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Single cypress tree grows through a Los Angeles hillside home

Duncan Meerding transforms tree stumps into lamps that double as tables and stools

June 15, 2015 by  
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Who knew tree stumps could have so many uses! Tasmanian furniture designer Duncan Meerding transformed ordinary tree stumps into gorgeous, weather-resistant lamps that can double as indoor and outdoor tables and stools,. The cracks in the timber of the Log Light illuminate an entire area with shards of light coming from warm LED strip lights fitted into the volume. Read the rest of Duncan Meerding transforms tree stumps into lamps that double as tables and stools Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Cracked Log Lamp , Duncan Meerding , furniture design , green lighting , lamp design , LED lights , reclaimed timber , sustainable design , tasmania

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Duncan Meerding transforms tree stumps into lamps that double as tables and stools

Reclaimed Wood Clads This Japanese Izakaya’s Origami-Like Interior in Montreal

October 16, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Reclaimed Wood Clads This Japanese Izakaya’s Origami-Like Interior in Montreal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Dominic Samson , interior design , izakaya , Japanese pub , Jean de Lessard , locally sourced wood , Montreal , reclaimed timber , reclaimed wood , recycled wood

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Reclaimed Wood Clads This Japanese Izakaya’s Origami-Like Interior in Montreal

U.S. Set to Blow $2.8 Trillion by Sitting in Traffic

October 16, 2014 by  
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Congestion will cost the U.S. $2.8 trillion over the next 16 years. It’s a boggling figure – but that’s exactly what a new report by the Seattle-based INRIX and the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) has found. The direct and indirect costs of staring at tail lights and picking our noses reached $124 billion last year, and that figure is set to rise by 50 percent to $186 billion per year in 2030. Read the rest of U.S. Set to Blow $2.8 Trillion by Sitting in Traffic Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autonomous car , cebr , congestion , congestion cost , cost , environmental cost , inrix , Pollution , self-driving car , smart traffic , traffic cost , traffic jam

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U.S. Set to Blow $2.8 Trillion by Sitting in Traffic

U.S. Set to Blow $2.8 Trillion by Sitting in Traffic

October 16, 2014 by  
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Congestion will cost the U.S. $2.8 trillion over the next 16 years. It’s a boggling figure – but that’s exactly what a new report by the Seattle-based INRIX and the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) has found. The direct and indirect costs of staring at tail lights and picking our noses reached $124 billion last year, and that figure is set to rise by 50 percent to $186 billion per year in 2030. Read the rest of U.S. Set to Blow $2.8 Trillion by Sitting in Traffic Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autonomous car , cebr , congestion , congestion cost , cost , environmental cost , inrix , Pollution , self-driving car , smart traffic , traffic cost , traffic jam

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