An innovative forever house renovation features a pocket park for the community

June 15, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on An innovative forever house renovation features a pocket park for the community

Mention the word ‘ renovation ’ and thoughts of expansion immediately spring to mind — especially in the expensive suburb Fitzroy of  Melbourne . So when the owners of a two-story terrace house in the neighborhood decided against creating a large home and instead sought to turn part of their unused site into a pocket park, they smartly tapped Austin Maynard Architects to lead the project. The local Australian architecture firm — known for its creative and anti-McMansion designs — created the King Bill “forever home” for a family of four that includes a revamped garden space and curved extensions, one of which is housed in an overhauled horse stable. Instead of building out the entire vacant lot east of the main house, Austin Maynard Architects selectively added a couple structures to the site. Contemporary additions include a new pavilion housing the kitchen, living and dining spaces, as well as a glazed corridor that connects the main house to the old horse stable that’s been converted into the garage and parents’ retreat. Corrugated colorbond steel metal clads the curvaceous extensions to provide a playful and striking contrast to the original brick left intact on the 19th-century terrace house. “Long time Fitzroy locals, the clients chose not to capitalise on their block by exploiting the vacant site,” the architects explained. “They wanted more living space but they had no intention of maximising the economic yields by creating a huge home. Instead, they sought to give something back to the suburb they love through a rich and generous garden .” Related: Energy-efficient Cut Paw Paw house is “ridiculously inside-out” in Australia The team refreshed the garden with new plants while preserving the existing pear and silver birch trees. The concrete slab of the new living space pavilion was carefully cantilevered so as not to disturb the tree root zones. The architects included minimal paving in the garden to maximize site permeability; the plantings also help to reduce the area’s heat island effect. The home also features  passive solar principles and rooftop solar panels. Rainwater is harvested and reused for irrigation and to flush toilets. Thanks to double-glazed windows, natural light fills the home. + Austin Maynard Architects Images by Derek Swalwell

The rest is here:
An innovative forever house renovation features a pocket park for the community

Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

Architecture studio Penda unveiled designs for an off-grid home Kassel, Germany with a stunning rooftop garden . Commissioned by a young family who wants to produce most of their own food, the Yin & Yang house features a minimal timber structure with a terraced roof curved in a shape evocative of the yin yang symbol. As shown in the startlingly realistic renderings, Yin & Yang House occupies a small corner lot. With very little ground space for a garden, Penda turned the roof into two terraced garden spaces to meet the client’s desires for a space to grow fruit, vegetables, and herbs. Rainwater will be collected on the roof and used for irrigation. Related: Trees to grow on the balconies of Penda’s timber high-rise in Toronto The eye-catching and seasonally changing roof is balanced by the building’s minimalist and boxy timber form. The two-story home features a garage, office space, kids’ bedroom, bathroom, master bedroom, and the kitchen and dining area on the ground floor, while the second floor includes additional sitting areas and a secondary workspace accessible by two separate staircases. Large windows let in natural light and views of the outdoors, with beautiful views of the terraced roof garden from the second floor spaces. + Penda Via Dezeen

Here is the original:
Gorgeous roof garden feeds owners in proposed off-grid Yin & Yang House

Breezy solar-powered sponge house is in tune with nature

February 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Breezy solar-powered sponge house is in tune with nature

Nature is celebrated at every turn in The Country House, an environmentally conscious home that embraces indoor-outdoor living in Bien Hoa, Vietnam. Completed by 1+1> 2 Architects , the house immediately stands out from its neighbors with its sloped thatch roofs, a nod to Vietnam’s countryside vernacular and a natural cooling mechanism. Built mainly of natural materials , the home also wraps around a lushly landscaped courtyard and boasts a variety of energy-efficient systems from solar cells to rainwater collection. Hidden behind tall white walls and ringed by trees, the 440-square-meter Country House is a private oasis. The home is curved to wrap around a garden with a water feature. The architects placed the corridor on side of the home closest to the garden and left parts of it open to the sun and wind, blurring the line between indoor and outdoor living. “The whole building structure considers human measurements,” wrote the architects, who describe it as a “sponge structure”. “Based on traditional experiences, the interaction between the inside and the outside within spacious architecture plays an important role. The lamellar solar protection made out of wood and appears along the corridor, with the roof, it creates a curved surface. Besides, the natural grey color of the thatch roof melts together with the garden.” Related: Rammed earth school in Vietnam blooms like a colorful jungle flower In addition to welcoming the outdoors in, the home also uses adobe for wall insulation and relies on solar rooftop panels for electricity. A 370-square-meter water tank collects rainwater reused for irrigation. + 1+1> 2 Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Son Vu

Read the original here: 
Breezy solar-powered sponge house is in tune with nature

Bad Behavior has blocked 3035 access attempts in the last 7 days.