Worlds most active volcano harbors a tiny off-grid homeand you can stay overnight

June 8, 2017 by  
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The Phoenix House is a tiny off-grid home that truly befits its name. Rising from the ashes of the world’s most active volcano, this solar-powered abode built of recycled materials boasts spectacular views of the Hawaiian landscape. Available for rent on AirBnB , the Phoenix House promises an unforgettable, off-the-beaten track experience and is just a bike ride away from a 100-foot lava waterfall. The eco-friendly Phoenix House is the newest creation by ArtisTree , a green design studio with an impressive portfolio of beautiful, low-impact treehouses and vacation homes. Located at the base of Mauna Loa volcano next to Kilauea, the tiny 450-square-foot Phoenix House is a shining beacon of sustainability and is part of a regenerative, off-grid community compound. Created to symbolize the temporal nature of life, the Phoenix House merges visual elements from a modern beach farmhouse with the stark volcanic landscape. The building is clad in charred Shou Sugi Ban timber to blend into the surroundings as well as recycled rusted corrugated metal that represents hot lava. “We built this house with deep respect for Mother Earth. For that reason, you will find the design minimalist, the development footprint light, and the result is one with its surroundings,” said Will Beilharz, the designer of Phoenix House, who also spoke of the difficulties of building on a lava field with 30-mile-per-hour winds. Related: Solar-powered cylindrical treehouse in Mexico is made with sustainable bamboo Sustainability is a major focus of the tiny house design. In addition to its use of solar power and recycled materials, the Phoenix House also collects and reuses rainwater . The modern home is equipped with all the comforts of home, including electricity, high-speed wifi and hot showers. The home, which accommodates two on a queen bed, is available for rent on Airbnb for $111 a night . Guests also have access to a fully equipped kitchenette with a propane stove top, living area with a couch and desk, and a small dinette table. + ArtisTree

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Worlds most active volcano harbors a tiny off-grid homeand you can stay overnight

Nature-inspired gallery celebrates Taiwans aboriginal cultures with cargotecture

March 31, 2017 by  
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A shimmering wave-like roof mirroring the Pacific Ocean tops this stunning new structure that celebrates Taiwan’s aboriginal cultures with eco-friendly construction. Bio-architecture Formosana recently completed the Taitung Aboriginal Gallery, a 1,921-square-meter exhibition center that draws inspiration from nature just as the architects of Austronesian culture did for centuries. With Taitung’s rich and varied landscapes as well as its seven different aboriginal tribes, the architects drew on a wealth of cultural and environmental resources for their design. The Taitung Aboriginal Gallery was created to celebrate the artistic and nature-inspired architectural elements of Austronesian culture. Thus, the architects created a large steel-framed roof with an undulating shape that mimics the topography and ocean, and is decorated with diamond shapes that symbolize the eyes of the ancestral spirits. The shape allows for access to natural light and ventilation throughout the building while providing much needed shade and cooling from the tropical sun. The sloped sides also facilitate collection of rainwater , which is stored in five small ponds in the plaza. Related: Mecanoo wins competition to design the Tainan Public Library with natural materials As an island with several major ports, Taiwan collects approximately 10,000 shipping containers from the ocean every year. The architects recycled a number of the containers into rooms within the Taitung Aboriginal Gallery. The repurposed and repainted shipping containers are individually air-conditioned and serve as aboriginal handicraft shops. “In Taitung’s tropical climate, individualized air conditioning reduces the refrigerating ton by 50%, and the electricity use by 60%,” write the architects. + Bio-architecture Formosana Via ArchDaily Images by Lucas K. Doolan

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Nature-inspired gallery celebrates Taiwans aboriginal cultures with cargotecture

Solar-powered Vreugdenhil office earns BREEAM-NL Outstanding for its low energy footprint

November 3, 2016 by  
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Triangular in plan, Vreugdenhil’s new head office is built like a work of art that eschews hard corners for rounded edges for a sculptural appearance. Curved glazing wraps around the building to let in copious amounts of natural light that reflect off the mostly white interior surfaces. The office’s most eye-catching feature is the grand spiraling staircase that wraps around a live tree in the center and ascends a light-filled triangular atrium . The office spaces that branch off of the staircase are flexible and designed to encourage employees to socialize and collaborate. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects renovate a derelict fire station into Antwerp’s new BREEAM-rated port headquarters In addition to incorporating natural light to minimize dependence on electricity, the energy-efficient building also includes an intelligent climate control system, a 170-panel solar array system, rainwater collection reused to flush the toilets, and a thermal energy storage system that heats and cools the building. The new office’s comfortable and attractive environment is also aimed to help the company reach its 2020 target to reduce the absenteeism rate to below 4%. + Maas Architecten Via ArchDaily Images via Maas Architecten

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Solar-powered Vreugdenhil office earns BREEAM-NL Outstanding for its low energy footprint

LEED Platinum GWU building helps people make healthier choices with smart design

October 26, 2016 by  
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The 161,100-square-foot Milken Institute School of Public Health was a difficult design challenge given its many programmatic requirements, odd triangular geometry, and restrictive zoning regulations that capped the allowable floor area and imposed a 90-foot maximum height limitation. The architects successfully overcame the unusual site geometry with an exposed post-tensioned cast-in-place concrete structural system and a seven-story atrium that fills the building with natural light and creates a sense of spaciousness without exceeding the allowed building area. Related: University of Pennsylvania’s green-roofed New College House targets LEED Silver In addition to centrally located stairs (and the somewhat hidden elevators), other ways the architects engineered public health into the building include the encourage of movement with standing desks and an indoor bicycle rack; clean indoor air with the help of low-light plants, a strong air filtration system, and sustainable low-VOC materials; and access to natural light, views, and a walkable neighborhood. The energy efficient school building earned LEED Platinum certification with eco-friendly elements such as local and recycled materials, a green roof, rainwater collection system, and low-flow plumbing . The project recently won a 2016 AIANY COTE Honor Award. + Payette + Ayers Saint Gross Architects Via ArchDaily Images via Payette , © Robert Benson

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LEED Platinum GWU building helps people make healthier choices with smart design

This family home in Japan is designed to let the rain inside

August 4, 2016 by  
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The house, dubbed the “Puddle”, is located in a densely populated area of Matsusaka City in Japan ‘s Mie prefecture. The large opening in its roof surface extends down into the living area and forms a small room where a puddle of rainwater brings the residents closer to nature. It shrinks and grows depending on the amount of  rainfall , constantly changing with the weather. Related: Japan’s CYIN House on stilts shelters a small winter garden The chimney also brings natural light into the interior and enables natural ventilation. The design was inspired by artist James Turrell, and creates a similar effect of spatial immersion. It brings the great outdoors indoors for a lifestyle more in-tune with nature. + Masaki Yoneda Via Spoon & Tamago

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This family home in Japan is designed to let the rain inside

Earthships heading to Canada will provide First Nation communities with low-income housing

July 20, 2016 by  
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Earthships are a unique kind of low-cost homes that are built primarily with recycled materials and produce and provide as much as possible on site. Created and marketed by New Mexico-based Earthship Biotecture , the earthship alleviates the problems of housing insecurity and environmental waste in one elegant solution. These sustainable housing units have been installed in India, Haiti, Sierra Leone, and other countries as a means to empower local communities. The Earthship team are now bringing their housing model to First Nations communities facing a housing crisis in Canada. Francine Doxtator and her family are among the first members of the First Nations to collaborate with Earthship Biotechture on such a project. “We’re all looking forward to the new home,” says Doxtator, “but I still don’t believe it’s happening.” The new earthship home, powered by solar panels, hydrated by a rainwater collection system, and insulated by recycled tires, will reduce utility bills by hundreds of dollars per month. It will also allow the family to have a more respectful relationship with nature. “We try and respect Mother Earth, says Doxtator. “Right now we’re ruining her. We have to look after her so she can look after us.” Related: First Nation builds spirited solar project in the heart of Canada’s oil sands While earthships may seem an ideal solution, there are obstacles that currently prevent their wider adoption. Earthships often do not qualify for standard mortgages or loans in Canada , which puts its cost of C$60,000 out of reach for many. Strict regulations on new housing on First Nations land also prohibits the spread of earthships. The newest earthship installation at the Doxtator homestead arrives as Prime Minister Trudeau has promised the public investment of C$554 million in First Nations communities. The earthship’s best days may still lie ahead. “I would love to see this happen for more people,” says Doxtator. Still, even the new homeowner is a bit perplexed by the unusual design. “I just hope it doesn’t look like a Flintstones house in the end.” Via the Guardian Images via Wikipedia , Flickr and  Adrienne Harper

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Earthships heading to Canada will provide First Nation communities with low-income housing

Escape city life in a lux off-grid cabin that can pop up almost anywhere

July 15, 2016 by  
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? Designed and produced by a team of architecture students-turned-entrepreneurs, the Ark Shelter was created to bring back people “back to basics” and into nature. Clad in durable timber for a cozy feel, each cabin is prefabricated off-site in a factory and then craned into place on raised, mobile foundations. Its modular architecture can be easily customized and expanded from its basic 9-square-meter workspace module to a fully livable space with a bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, and a living room. Related: Stunning Moon Dragon is a fairytale-like tiny house that goes off-grid ? The self-sufficient structure is equipped with wind turbines and rainwater collection systems, while natural light streams through folding glazed doors to minimize dependence on artificial light and embrace panoramic views of the outdoors. There’s no word on price on the website; interested parties will have to contact the design team directly. All Ark Shelters are delivered fully furnished, from custom timber furnishings to the bed linens. + Ark Shelter Via Architizer Images via Ark Shelter

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Escape city life in a lux off-grid cabin that can pop up almost anywhere

This pop-up rainwater pavilion in Edinburgh is designed to raise awareness about water

July 12, 2016 by  
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The Rotterdam Watershed is comprised of 2,400 ” recycled pvc rainwater pipes .” On the outside of the shed-like structure, plants close off half of the pipes. The other half are closed off inside with caps, and rainwater collected slowly drips through holes in the caps to fill a pond inside the pavilion. Visitors to the Rotterdam Watershed can hop over the pond on stepping stones made of concrete. Related: Four fascinating Summer Houses accompany this year’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Using recycled pipes allowed the designers to save money and hire ” people with poor job prospects ” to help build the Rotterdam Watershed. According to DoepelStrijkers , “Rotterdam is famous for its innovative concepts relating to climate adaption and mitigation. Urban development with maximal social and ecological benefits has become part of the city’s sustainable approach over the last decade…The pavilion illustrates in a playful manner how the city of Rotterdam is dealing with the effects of climate change.” DoepelStrijkers’ Rotterdam Watershed won a design competition with the theme of “dry feet” put on by the city of Rotterdam. Their pavilion is now on display at the Pop-Up Cities Expo. There are LED lights in the pipes to illuminate the pavilion so people can visit at night. Visitors can check out the pavilion this summer in Edinburgh’s Mound Square. It’s estimated that during the expo, the Rotterdam Watershed will capture around 1,500 liters , or about 396 gallons of water. + DoepelStrijkers + Rotterdam Watershed Images courtesy of Peter van der Wal/DoepelStrijkers

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This pop-up rainwater pavilion in Edinburgh is designed to raise awareness about water

Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

June 15, 2016 by  
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The Huba mountain hut puts a modern twist on traditional alpine architecture and comprises two main parts: a power module and a living module. In case of damage, each module can be separated and repaired independently. The Huba living module, made primarily from locally sourced fallen trees, sleeps up to four in collapsible beds and is also equipped with a wall heater, sink, and LED lighting. The Power Module, on the other hand, is made out of recycled aluminum and contains a wind turbine, made from recycled plastic using a method called roto-molding, and a battery. The roof is angled to optimize collection of rainwater, which is filtered and used for the sink, drinking, and outside shower. Related: These spectacular alpine cabins will awaken your inner adventurer The modules are designed for easily assembly and disassembly, and are strong enough to withstand harsh winds and heavy rainfall. The Huba could also be integrated with a rental app to give travelers easy access to information about Huba locations and the opportunity to recommend locations for future huts. “Huba as a system works to provide for users a simple, trustful system, in which the bigger number of smaller shelters can serve as a unified accommodation at different stages of travel,” writes the designer. “It is designed to promote sustainable, and circular design to the public, thus creating a better awareness of challenges and possibilities.” + Cradle to Cradle Product Design Challenge Images by Malgorzata Blachnicka

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Self-sustaining Cradle to Cradle mountain hut is designed to generate its own energy

Renovated Ibiza farmhouse boasts ultra thick walls for passive cooling

March 30, 2016 by  
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