This interactive woven canopy at MoMA PS1 changes colors as the sun sets

June 30, 2017 by  
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New Yorkers looking for a place to cool off during the summer will do well to duck into Long Island City’s MoMA PS1 – and it’s not just because the museum’s galleries are air-conditioned. A new interactive installation there, called Lumen , is an experience well-worth the trip. Lumen feels like a bright underwater landscape with 250 jellyfish-like tubular structures that interact with light, heat and movement. As the sun sets, colorful solar-powered lights come on, transforming the entire courtyard with an otherworldly vibe. Designed by Jenny Sabin Studio and debuting to the public June 29, Lumen is the winner of The Museum of Modern Arts and MoMA PS1’s 18th edition of the Young Architects Program and will serve as the setting for the 20th season of the Warm Up outdoor concert series this summer. The project integrates various disciplines, including biology, materials science, mathematics, engineering and design, to produce an artistic micro-climate that is both environmentally responsive and beautiful. The canopy is made of over 1,000,000 yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fiber. During the day, the sun shines through the gaps in the canopy’s fabric to create murals of light and shadows against the concrete walls.Because the design requirements called for shade, water and seating, a responsive water system was incorporated into the hanging fabric tubes. Called stalactites, the tubes spray a fine mist when bodies draw near. In addition, 100 recycled spool stools (also robotically woven) provide a place to rest tired feet after a day roaming through the galleries, meeting another criteria that designs incorporate sustainability and recycling in its elements. The recycled fabric absorbs solar power over the course of the day and then emits it at night. Related: MoMA PS1 unveils futuristic solar canopy that reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement Lumen appeals to the senses; the soft white fabric is juxtaposed against the hard wooden seats and floors engraved with white geometric patterns. The installation invites visitors to play among the hanging fabric as water hits their skin. Lumen exudes both weightlessness and levity as the canopy sways in the breeze during the day and then almost an eeriness when it morphs into a photoluminescent wonderland. Once the Warm Up music series kicks off July 1, custom lighting incorporated into the installation’s design will complement the shows to provide both a visual and aural experience. All of which should make for one vibrant summer. Lumen will be on view at MoMA PS1’s courtyard from June 29 though August 27. + Jenny Sabin Studio All images by Dorkys Ramos for Inhabitat

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This interactive woven canopy at MoMA PS1 changes colors as the sun sets

Environmentalists question ‘worrisome’ NYC plan to pour chlorine in sewers

May 3, 2017 by  
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Every year around 20 billion gallons of untreated sewage streams into the waterways of New York City during overwhelming rainfalls. Attempting to stave off health risks, the city has a plan: pour chlorine into sewer pipes. But environmental advocates say the technique is shortsighted and worrisome. The city has attempted a few fixes to the issue, such as new retention tanks and greenery planted to reduce runoff. Now they want to disinfect wastewater inside pipes with chlorine; those pipes lead to three bodies of water in the Bronx and Queens . Riverkeeper staff lawyer Sean Dixon told The New York Times, “They’re using the most worrisome and unproven technique that we have in our toolbox. It’s like they’re grabbing the last straw and using the cheapest and least effective method.” Related: Danish city becomes world’s first to power water treatment plant with sewage Dixon said chlorine sometimes doesn’t even disinfect sewage completely, and doesn’t treat certain toxins. Further, residual chlorine can harm marine life . Chlorination is commonly utilized in wastewater treatment plans, not pipes that run into waterways. New York City Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Ted Timbers said chlorine is “the most widely used disinfectant for water and wastewater treatment in the U.S.” He said the plan had been talked about in meetings with the public, and that chlorination would occur from May to October. Queens College hydrologist Timothy Eaton said chlorine can be effective in controlled settings, but with unpredictable changes in sewage flow, residual chlorine could be left behind and the exact dosage would be tricky to get right. He told The New York Times, “It’s very difficult to predict the amount of water you’re going to get at any period of time. If you overdose it, you’re basically treating Flushing Creek and Flushing Bay like swimming pools .” Via The New York Times Images via Pixabay and Wikimedia Commons

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Environmentalists question ‘worrisome’ NYC plan to pour chlorine in sewers

Winning suspended greenhouse design envisions hanging gardens for New York City

August 18, 2016 by  
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Once a part of the 1964-65 World’s Far in Queens, the pavilion was used as a concert hall and skating rink before being abandoned. The National Trust for Historic Preservation partnered with the People for the Pavilion to launch the design competition, announced by Bustler , which brought in over 250 submissions. Botanical gardens, metro stations, and museums were among the proposed designs. Related: Iconic New York State World’s Fair Pavilion saved from demolition First place went to Aidan Doyle and Sarah Wan of Seattle , Washington, for “Hanging Meadows.” They summarize their project as seeking “to rekindle the powerful legacy of the NY State Pavilion by repurposing the original structure to create a suspended natural environment. Hanging Meadows will collect, organize and exhibit flora native to particular parts of the Northeastern US.” Second place was given to Javier Salinas of New York for “Civic Hub.” He described how “this multi-purpose space would work in conjunction with public programming. Shuttles from local community and senior centers would be sure to include everyone on the various local events and festivals that would be hosted in the open event space.” Third place went to Rishi Kejrewal and Shaurya Sharma of Bhopal, India, for “Pavilion for the Community.” The team notes, “Features such as a communal children’s play area and solar panels pave the way towards a brighter future for the coming generations.” The Queens Award was given to locals Cesar Juarez and Alida Rose Delaney for “Pavilion Park.” The public park incorporates the original landmark. They said: “With a focus on the integrity of the original structure, the flexible communal space would be centered around a stage with built-in stadium seating.” A special Fan Favorite Award was handed to Houiji Ramzi of Saint Etienne, France, for “Tent of the Future,” which is described as “a combination between sustainable development and new technologies.” Solar panels throughout the public-accessible park capture energy for the Earth-friendly feature. Via Bustler , Archinect Images via Bustler

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Winning suspended greenhouse design envisions hanging gardens for New York City

Crazy Transportation Hub Looks Like and Alien Organism Landed on Queens

April 22, 2014 by  
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The Long Island Rail Road station in Woodside, Queens is currently nothing to write home about, but that could all change if Chad Kellogg and Matt Bowles of AMLGM Labs have their way. The duo recently re-imagined the transportation hub as an amorphous, flexible-skinned structure called the Urban Alloy Towers. The energy-efficient hub would keep energy costs low by using advanced shading technologies to keep its interior cool. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AMLGM Labs , Architecture , crazy architecture , dream buildings , LIRR , New York’s most outlandish buildings , New York’s strangest buildings , odd New York Buildings , queens , strange NY buidings , transit hub , transportation hub , Urban Alloy Towers , Woodside

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Crazy Transportation Hub Looks Like and Alien Organism Landed on Queens

Banksy’s Upcycled Sphinx Brazenly Stolen from Queens

October 28, 2013 by  
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Is robbery the highest form of flattery? UK street artist Banksy recently completed an upcycled Sphinx sculpture made out of old cinderblocks only to have the piece stolen shortly after by the hired hands of an opportunistic art gallery. According to reports, the statue was dismantled piece by piece and loaded it onto a vehicle right in front of a crowd of Bansky admirers. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Arab Spring , Banksy , banksy nyc , banksy sphinx , better out than in , cinderblock sculpture , graffiti art , Middle East , mobile installations , new york city , political art , public art , queens , sphinx        

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Banksy’s Upcycled Sphinx Brazenly Stolen from Queens

How to Score a Summer Outfit for $21 at the Bayside Thrift Shop!

August 28, 2011 by  
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Has all of summer’s fun left your bank account a little dry? If you’ve still got a lot of events slated for the last days of the sunny season, but seem to have exhausted all your nicest things, then take a cue from Inhabitat editor Yuka Yoneda on how to create a stylin’ outfit for just a little over 20 bucks. You can snag a polished wardrobe for über cheap by just hitting up your local thrift store. In her first installment of her new series, “ Goodwill Hunting ,” Yuka unearths some hidden gems at the second-oldest thrift store in New York City: the  Bayside Thrift Shop in Flushing, Queens. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bargain fashion , Bayside Thrift Shop , eco-fashion , Ethical Fashion , flushing , Goodwill Hunting , green fashion , new york city , queens , secondhand clothing , secondhand fashion , Sustainable Fashion , thrift shops , thrift stores , vintage clothing , vintage fashion

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How to Score a Summer Outfit for $21 at the Bayside Thrift Shop!

NYC Rolls Out Real-Time Water Metering

July 16, 2010 by  
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This past Monday, New York City’s Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Environmental Protection Commissioner Cas Holloway initiated a city-wide tracking system that will help consumers and businesses monitor their water usage in real time.

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NYC Rolls Out Real-Time Water Metering

Flushing Commons is a Green Megacomplex for Queens, New York

February 3, 2010 by  
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Ask most people about Flushing, Queens and they’re likely to either stare blankly or venture “Where the Nanny is from?!” That all might change with the development of a 1.8 million sq. foot, $850 million megacomplex for the area

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Flushing Commons is a Green Megacomplex for Queens, New York

A Bridge Grows in Queens?

January 27, 2010 by  
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Image credit: Good For years, residents of Astoria, a neighborhood in Queens, New York City, dealt with a scummy flow of water. Caused by a leaky pipe, the scum river flooded the sidewalk and iced over in winter. It was a problem, until two creative artists found a DIY solution ….

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A Bridge Grows in Queens?

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