Dande-lier: Everyday objects transformed into stunning art in Singapore

November 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Dande-lier: Everyday objects transformed into stunning art in Singapore

Umbrellas and PVC pipes might not mean much to you, but in the right hands they can be turned into a stunning work of art. That’s what happened in Singapore earlier this year with the unveiling of Dande-lier, a temporary art installation and public space crafted from everyday objects. Design collective Colours: Collectively Ours used dozens of transparent umbrellas and PVC pipes to create an unusual dome-shaped pavilion that lit up at night like a glowing lantern. Created for Asia’s leading sustainable light art festival i Light Marina Bay in Singapore, Dande-lier was constructed to wow visitors at night, yet appeal to passersby during the day. Built for easy assembly, the pavilion was constructed from seven layers of triangular PVC pipe modules held together with metal pipe clamps. The resulting dome-shaped structure supported a canopy of tied translucent umbrellas . “Dande-lier conveys a feeling of weightlessness by using lightweight umbrellas, transforming an everyday object into a device to change the visitors’ perspective of their surroundings,” wrote the designers. “The umbrella spans across scales, individually as a chandelier, and collectively as a dandelion – hence, “Dande-lier”. Within, the view of the outside world is warped, transporting visitors into an alternate world, with a smart lighting system that responds dynamically to the visitors’ position in the sculpture.” Related: Mesmerizing Cube Pavillion Made from Mundane PVC Pipes While the installation provided shelter and respite from the sun during the day, at night it was transformed into a dynamic art installation illuminated by a smart lighting system. Motion sensors triggered changes in the colored lights and projected animations. + Colours: Collectively Ours Via ArchDaily Images © Oddinary Studios

Read the rest here: 
Dande-lier: Everyday objects transformed into stunning art in Singapore

San Francisco’s Wave Organ captures the sounds of the sea to make haunting music

September 29, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on San Francisco’s Wave Organ captures the sounds of the sea to make haunting music

A symphony of strange and haunting music made from the waves can be heard at the tip of a jetty in San Francisco. Part sculpture, part musical instrument, the Wave Organ is an unusual land art installation that harnesses the rhythms of the water. Created by Exploratorium artists Peter Richards and George Gonzalez, the wave-activated sound sculpture is set atop the salvaged remains of a demolished cemetery and is one of the city’s best hidden gems. Installed in 1986, the Wave Organ is a somewhat obscure landmark, often overlooked due to its hard-to-find location at the end of a jetty east of the St. Francis Yacht Club. Making the trek out there, however, is worth it. Surrounded by stunning 360-degree views of the San Francisco bay, the environmental artwork harnesses the pulse of the sea through 25 PVC and concrete pipes located at various elevations that transmit the sounds of crashing waves and gurgling water to elevated openings for listening. Related: Incredible ‘Sea Organ’ uses ocean waves to make beautiful music The Wave Organ is best heard during high tide, but can still be enjoyed at other times of the day though the gurgling rhythms will be much quieter. The music of the bay, which is made by waves slapping against and pushed through the pipes, is relatively subtle. Visitors will need to sit and let their ears attune to the environment to fully enjoy the performance. Carved granite and marble salvaged from the demolished crypts of the city’s former Laurel Hill Cemetery provide plenty of seating. Times for high tides can be checked here . + Exploratorium Images via Wikimedia , Shutterstock

Read the original here: 
San Francisco’s Wave Organ captures the sounds of the sea to make haunting music

Bad Behavior has blocked 1274 access attempts in the last 7 days.