The Washington Alley Project seeks to revitalize D.C.

October 22, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

The Washington Alley Project seeks to transform D.C.’s alleys for modern urban living. In Washington, D.C. , there are 82,397 single-family residential properties with alley frontage. If the Washington Alley model was applied to all of these spaces, it could house 187,900 new residents. Mark Lawrence is the principal and co-founder of EL Studio, the company behind this ambitious project. Lawrence and co-creator Elizabeth Emerson started the Washington Alley Project to show how cities can adapt and change without sacrificing their architectural history, a major concern for many urban centers across the country. EL Studio has organized Alley Hops, self-guided walks in city alleys, which feature viewfinders that show the potential of various alley areas. Images might show a basketball court, mural, performing stage, seating areas, sculptures and even gardens . These images illustrate the project’s vision for transforming the city’s alleys. Related: ODA’s vibrant new complex transforms a conventional DC block The Alley Hops were designed to show that D.C. is full of unused spaces, places that could be teeming with life and activity. Alley Hop participants provide feedback about how they think alley spaces can and should be used and what they’d like to see. Using the Alley Hops, EL Studio did an extensive survey of the alleys and designed ways to turn these spaces into vibrant living and community spaces. There are 3,217 alleys in Washington, D.C. alone. Together, they take up 246 linear miles. That’s a lot of potential space that is largely going unused. Imagine a space full of options instead. Modular dog parks made with Astroturf could create areas for pets to play. Market stalls could offer space for farmers and artisans to display their goods. Safety lights could brighten up the shadowy areas. Rubber surfaces in bright colors could create play areas for children. And perhaps best of all, new housing in these underused areas could provide homes for people. It’s a vision for the future that is already beginning to come true. Prather’s Alley in D.C. will be the project’s starting ground. The improvement plan for the alley will see the addition of safe zones cut off from traffic and resting places for residents and patrons who come to the many nearby businesses. + Washington Alley Project Images courtesy of Liz Gorman and EL Studio

Go here to see the original: 
The Washington Alley Project seeks to revitalize D.C.

Innovative biophilic design planned for new village in Portugal

October 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

A new development is in the works, designed to sit on a Portuguese hillside and provide a community with unique characteristics and a focus on sustainable design, function, well-being and innovation. The project is dubbed Fuse Valley. It’s a collaboration between Farfetch, the leading global technology platform for luxury fashion , and Portuguese real estate developer Castro Group. The duo brought in notable sustainability-focused architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) to design the plan for the site. Related: The High Performance Surfing Center honors nature inside and out Located along the slopes of the Leça River in Porto, the site was chosen for its proximity to convenient transportation and the river. The overall blueprint of Fuse Valley will include 24 buildings for a mixture of tech companies, a hotel , small start-ups, and services. Farfetch HQ will encompass 12 interconnected buildings that open the doors to creativity and idea exchange between employees and visitors. “The individual buildings that constitute the various elements of the organization are connected to form large contiguous work environments – physically consolidated, but spatially varied to create a human-scale experience,“ said João Albuquerque, Partner in Charge at BIG . The BIG design places the buildings around plazas, parks and courtyards meant to blur the lines between the outdoors and indoor spaces while promoting a healthy work and community  environment . The Farfetch buildings include lobbies, an academy, an auditorium, a canteen and wellness facilities that flow together as an extension of the surrounding hillside and emphasize biophilic design throughout the spaces. The location and the focus on health are seen through the plans to cater to mobility to, from, and onsite with electric vehicle charging stations and infrastructure to support the use of bicycles and electric scooters. Fuse Valley will also connect to the main public transport via shuttles. According to Paulo Castro, CEO of Castro Group, “Fuse Valley is the perfect interpretation of our golden rule, applied to all our projects: location, innovation, sustainability, and technology . What we are going to do in Matosinhos is something unique and that puts this space on the international map of what is best done both in terms of sustainability and in terms of innovation. With this project, we intend to develop a smart city, or in this case, a smart valley.” In both construction and scheduled use of the buildings, Farfetch and Fuse Valley are leaning into  green building practices  and low environmental impact with the hope of being one of the most sustainable building developments in Portugal and Europe. Fuse Valley is scheduled to break ground by early 2023 and open its doors in 2025. + Farfetch Via BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group Visualizations by Lucian R, courtesy of BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group

Go here to read the rest: 
Innovative biophilic design planned for new village in Portugal

Casa Numa is built out of 50-year-old coconut palm wood

October 15, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

At a first glance, you might not believe that Casa Numa is entirely built out of coconut palm wood over 50 years old. The 160 square meters of living space is a beauty to behold both inside and out. Casa Numa is located on Holbox Island, Quintana Roo, where it functions as a vacation rental. According to Susana López, the chief architect behind the project, the idea behind the building was to integrate sustainability and nature in a modern living space. López is an architect with a Master’s Degree in Sustainable Design and Development for the City from the Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey. She is recognized for her exemplary work creating modern, sustainable designs. Related: This collapsible cooler is insulated with upcycled coconut fiber This project is built out of old coconut tree wood. At first glance, the striking front lattice of coconut palm wood stands out. You can’t ignore the beauty of the pattern amid a sunny, warm environment. This lattice offers privacy by obscuring the view into the home. The coconut palm wood used in the building is supported on sapote tree piles. All the materials are sustainably sourced from local jungles . Some may argue that such a design is wasteful for using too much wood, but it is important to note that all the wood used is over 50 years old. In other words, the designers used wood that would have otherwise ended up in flames, contributing to carbon emissions. Additionally, using locally sourced wood minimized the introduction of foreign materials to the island. The materials used in this project also benefit the home. Palm wood insulation minimizes heating needs and helps keep the house comfortable in both hot and cold conditions. The effectiveness of the materials also stands out in terms of the time needed for construction. Casa Numa’s structure was completed in only three months. Casa Numa shows how nature can provide everything we need to live a comfortable life. With efficient, local materials , this project creates a sustainable, original living space. + RED Arquitectos Photography by Miguel Calanchini

See original here:
Casa Numa is built out of 50-year-old coconut palm wood

5 standout brands from Vegan Fashion Week 2021

October 15, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

As more consumers prioritize sustainability, the days of fast fashion are numbered. This year’s Vegan Fashion Week in Los Angeles highlighted brands that are stepping up to meet the demand for ethical products by offering fashionable creations free of animal products.  In 2021, vegan fashion has moved beyond the simple aesthetics from its days as a niche market. Now, you can find clothes you have an affinity for in a variety of styles. Curious about what the vegan fashion world has to offer? Check out these five standout brands from Vegan Fashion Week 2021. Related: Get your vegan jewelry fix with KEVA’s cactus leather line Vegan Tiger Vegan Tiger kicked off Vegan Fashion Week’s Friday fashion show. As Korea’s first vegan fashion brand, Vegan Tiger wants to “end fur animal suffering and give consumers wider choices,” according to their mission statement. To this end, Vegan Tiger creates cruelty-free clothing, including faux fur outerwear and GRS-certified recycled polyester jackets. While these high-fashion items come with high prices, the brand puts some of its proceeds toward donations for animals and the environment. Lunar Method Cactus leather has been having its moment in the fashion industry, and Lunar Method puts it to use in luxurious, functional bags. Accentuated with colorful fabrics sourced from Mexican artisans, these bags are made of durable, PETA-certified cactus leather. A relatively new brand, Lunar Method began researching animal leather alternatives in December 2020 and launched a Kickstarter in July 2021. One of the brand’s collections is already sold out, showing the high demand for sustainable, vegan leather products. Fleur & Bee Looking for a more affordable vegan brand? All of Fleur & Bee’s clean skincare products are under $30. From facial cleanser and toner, to vitamin C serum and eye cream, Fleur & Bee has everything you need for a natural, vegan beauty regimen. Its products are also free of sulfates, parabens and artificial fragrances. Solios For a timeless accessory, check out these solar -powered watches from Solios . Started by university friends Samuel Leroux and Alexandre Desabrais, Solios creates sustainable watches powered by clean, renewable energy. The brand does not use any single-use plastic in its supply chain, favoring instead for recycled and recyclable paper packaging. Solios also donates to the Rainforest Trust and has committed to protecting one acre of rainforest for each watch sold. Shoes 53045 Complete your outfit with stylish shoes from Shoes 53045 . While working to become more sustainable, this vegan brand strives to source renewable and recycled materials. Currently, Shoes 53045 uses Better Cotton Initiative certified canvas and GRS-certified recycled cotton for some of its shoes. It’s also sourcing a corn-based leather alternative, finding ways to minimize shipping emissions and planting one tree for each pair of shoes sold. So far, the company has planted 22,550 trees as part of its program. While the vegan fashion world still has room to grow in terms of prioritizing eco-friendly materials and making products accessible to a wider range of consumers, these brands show the potential in cruelty-free clothing. Photography by Delaney Tran and Grae Gleason / Inhabitat

Read the original: 
5 standout brands from Vegan Fashion Week 2021

Episode 288: Behind Logitech’s carbon labels

October 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Episode 288: Behind Logitech’s carbon labels

Plus, more on the new employee engagement guide published by Project Drawdown.

More here:
Episode 288: Behind Logitech’s carbon labels

Mars targets net zero for value chain by 2050

October 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Mars targets net zero for value chain by 2050

Mars CEO calls for corporate net-zero goals that are ‘fit for purpose’ as multinational ramps up science-based targets to cover entire business and value chain.

See original here:
Mars targets net zero for value chain by 2050

Hog waste into biogas: Green solution or greenwashing?

October 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Hog waste into biogas: Green solution or greenwashing?

North Carolina’s industrial-scale hog farms have long been a major source of pollution. Smithfield Foods plans to turn some hog waste into biogas, but critics say the project does nothing about the larger problem of waste being stored in lagoons and sprayed on fields.

Read the rest here:
Hog waste into biogas: Green solution or greenwashing?

El Perdido honors its environment and the local culture

October 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on El Perdido honors its environment and the local culture

Estudio ALA recently completed a small development in Baja California Sur with an overarching goal of reintroducing local culture into the architecture , building process and visitor experience. The project is called El Perdido, and it’s a collection of hut-like accommodations that make up a desert tourism destination. Rather than importing most materials and ignoring the environment, El Perdido pays special attention to local tradition and the project’s impact. Related: Mexico City oasis features terrace gardens on every floor El Perdido is located in the small agricultural town of El Pescadero, which is rich in plantations of basil, chili, tomatoes and strawberries. To honor these historical roots while minimizing the need for resources like water, the design team left the surrounding landscape natural, with expansive low natural shrubs and  plants . Near the entrance, a grove of palo blanco trees provide natural shading, too. The huts were developed with attention to the natural climate of the region, providing guest comfort through  passive design  for effective heating and cooling. “Temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind, and solar incidence on the site were taken into consideration to employ strategies of passive cooling during the summer and passive heating in the winter,” the team said. The site was also equipped with its own water treatment plant and a saltwater pool with saline chlorinators to reduce chemical use and improve  water  efficiency.  The accommodations are built with earthen walls, and  wood  is the primary support material for each structure. The palm roofs add to the authentic appeal and overall nod to Baja California Sur’s heritage. Materials were sourced regionally, minimizing the need for lengthy transport, and local artisans were hired for the build.   The campus includes a main guest house, which includes a living area, dining room, kitchen bar for visitors, multipurpose area, store with local products, and reception. This is a gathering area and main hub of the property. Also on site is a  restaurant  and bar. Walkways lead throughout the campus to the lodgings and a sunken courtyard with low walls made from natural materials. In the courtyard, visitors can find a fountain and chapel. A stroll further along the walkway leads to an observatory with expansive ocean views.  At the center of the property is a shared pool in a courtyard that connects to the villas and main house. Each villa was designed to maximize efficiency and invite a marriage between the indoors and outdoors. + Estudio ALA  Via ArchDaily Images via Iwan Baan 

Originally posted here:
El Perdido honors its environment and the local culture

Go glamping in Canada at this mirror cabin

October 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Go glamping in Canada at this mirror cabin

The newest project by Québec-based Bourgeois / Lechasseur architects aims to peacefully immerse visitors into nature, while making a minimal architectural footprint . Reflection consists of two cabins, each with room for up to six persons in the main living area with fireplace, two enclosed bedrooms, a bathroom and an outdoor spa. The exterior of the cabins are clad in dark wood on three sides, creating the illusion of disappearing into the forest. The fourth side of each cabin is equipped with a fully-glazed façade that provides natural light to the interior space and views to the surrounding area. Related: Holiday cabin made of local materials enables the rewilding of a Devon farm The identical units are located just 50 meters from each other with the openings facing opposite directions for privacy. The location is close to the popular ski resort Massif Petite-Rivière-Saint-François. The flat lot is accessible via an unpaved road that is connected to hiking trails .  Wood is used throughout the spaces. There is an emphasis on contrast from the dark wood cladding outside and the interior living room, to the light pine that adorns the ceilings and underneath the eaves.  Each cabin contains two modules that were prefabricated off site. This made for minimal site impact , but came with challenges in engineering mechanical connections between the modules once on-site.  The massive mirrored façades not only required special treatment during the build, but were designed with the wildlife in mind. To prevent injury to birds from impact with the windows, the client and the team decided on a product approved by the renowned Audubon Society. By discreetly installing bird deterrent window markers on the outside of the glass panes, it offered protection for the animals without obstructing human view. “A nostalgic yearning for nature resides deep in the minds of many Canadians, often conceived as rustic log cabins tucked away in the woods,” stated a press release about the project. “Today’s travelers, however, seek comfort and poetry, something Reflection will also provide as guests immerse themselves in the surrounding forest.” + Bourgeois / Lechasseur architects  Photography by Adrien Williams

Excerpt from:
Go glamping in Canada at this mirror cabin

Conservationists continue fighting despite Line 3’s completion

October 4, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Conservationists continue fighting despite Line 3’s completion

On Thursday last week, Enbridge, the Canadian oil company in charge of the Line 3 project, announced that work on the pipeline was complete. The pipeline is expected to start ferrying oil across Minnesota this Monday. The $3 billion project was given to Enbridge. The new line replaces an old, corroding pipeline from the 1960s and doubles its capacity. Related: Stop Line 3 protests continue at Minnesota capitol Despite the setback, activist groups that have been fighting to stop the project vowed to continue opposing Line 3. “The Line 3 fight is far from over, it has just shifted gears,” wrote the Indigenous Environmental Network. “We will continue to stand on the frontlines until every last tar sands pipeline is shut down and Indigenous communities are no longer targeted but our right to consent or denial is respected.” In June this year, about 250 people were arrested in one day while protesting Line 3. More recently, over 2,000 protestors showed up at the Governor’s office in Minnesota demanding an end to the project. From when the project began to now, roughly 900 protestors have been arrested, according to Honor the Earth, an Indigenous environmental group. “The U.S. has tragically failed once again to honor our treaties and protect the water that sustains all life on Mother Earth,” the Indigenous Environmental Network said in a statement following the recent developments. Margaret Levin, director of the Sierra Club’s North Star Chapter, has lamented the pipeline’s opening. Levin singled out the Biden administration for ignoring calls from conservation groups to end the project. “President Biden and the other politicians who chose to do nothing as treaty rights were violated, waterways were polluted , and peaceful protesters were brutalized have placed themselves on the wrong side of history,” said Levin. Via Grist Lead image by Lorie Shaull

See the rest here: 
Conservationists continue fighting despite Line 3’s completion

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 14424 access attempts in the last 7 days.