The entire world could be powered by one deep-sea wind farm

October 10, 2017 by  
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What if the world’s energy problems could be solved with one deep-sea wind farm ? A new study, conducted by the Carnegie Institution for Science at Stanford University, California, suggests it could. Scientists determined that if a renewable energy project the size of India were to be constructed in the ocean, enough electricity could be generated to fulfill the energy needs of every nation on earth. In the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, doctors Anna Possner and Ken Caldeira wrote: “On an annual mean basis, the wind power available in the North Atlantic could be sufficient to power the world.” The duo noted that wind speeds are on average 70 percent higher over the Earth’s oceans than on land. In order to generate the equivalent of all energy used today, a deep-sea wind farm would need to span three million square kilometers. On land, the concept would never work. This is because when more wind turbines are added to a farm, the combined drag from the turning blades limits the amount of energy that can be obtained. As a result of this effect, electricity generation for large wind farms on land is limited to about 1.5 watts per square meter . In the North Atlantic, however, the limit would be much higher — more than six watts per square meter. Related: The world’s biggest offshore wind farm is being built in the UK The Independent reports that this is possible because more heat pours into the atmosphere above the North Atlantic Ocean. As a result, the problem of “ turbine drag” is essentially overcome. Said Possner, “We found that giant ocean-based wind farms are able to tap into the energy of the winds throughout much of the atmosphere whereas wind farms onshore remain constrained by the near-surface wind resources.” During the summer, the output from the vast North Atlantic wind farm would drop to one-fifth of the annual average. Despite this, enough energy would still be generated to meet the electricity demands of all countries in the European Union . The scientists added that a deep sea wind farm would have to operate in “remote and harsh conditions,” where waves heights often reach more than 3 meters. If these hurdles were overcome, political and economic challenges would need to be tackled next. + Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Via The Independent Images via Wikimedia Commons [1] , Wikimedia Commons [2] , Wikimedia Commons [3] and Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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The entire world could be powered by one deep-sea wind farm

This incredible floating tent is the stuff of camping dreams

October 10, 2017 by  
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This incredible floating tent is one of those things you never knew you needed. Ohio-based outdoor equipment company SmithFly has designed what they describe as the world’s first floating tent , the Shoal Tent . With it, according to SmithFly, “the world is your waterbed.” SmithFly’s floating tent looks like way too much fun. The base is an inflatable raft, covered by a tent topper. There are no tent poles necessary, according to the company, because the tent structure is inflatable. They also say when it is inflated, it can endure high winds. Naturally, the tent fabric is waterproof . And it seems the Shoal Tent would be a pretty cozy place to spend the night; the “six inch thick drop stitched” floor basically acts as an air mattress. Related: See-through dome lets you immerse yourself in nature and sleep beneath the stars “The tent topper sides all attach and detach using heavy duty hook and loop for the ability to use just the top and get in and out easily through the sides if the need arises suddenly,” the company said in their product description, and the floor inflates to 10 pounds per square inch (psi), while the tubes inflate to three psi. The floating tent is eight feet by eight feet, measured from outside to outside. Inside, a person 6’3″ tall can lay down or stand up in the middle. The tent weighs around 75 pounds, and can fold down to a burrito shape to fit inside a storage bag that’s around 60 by 24 by 18 inches. The company suggests camping on “your favorite farm pond, salt water flat, spring creek, or eddie on your favorite river .” SmithFly launched in 2010, the brainchild of designer and fly fisherman Ethan Smith, who aimed to create a better fly fishing vest pack. The company offers products manufactured in the United States and lists sustainability as one of their top priorities. They aim to make multi-generational products, with the hope customers “only buy one of our vests and that it lasts long enough that your great-grand kids can use it.” The Shoal Tent costs $1,499 and is available to pre-order online; SmithFly says they’re not in stock yet but the first batch will be going out in December or January. The tent kit comes with a storage bag, manual foot pump, and patch kit. + SmithFly Images via SmithFly

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This incredible floating tent is the stuff of camping dreams

How can I reuse or recycle a wooden shoe rack?

October 16, 2012 by  
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There was a neighbourhood “give and take” event near me at the weekend – people took along their unwanted items and took home anything other people had donated that took their fancy — all for free. It was mostly small things – crockery, household knick-knacks and books – but there were some larger things too – old TVs and other electronics, rugs and other bits of furniture. We didn’t “take” anything in the end: I was tempted by a pretty coffee pot from the kitchenware table until John pointed out that we already have one which we don’t use, and I was also VERY tempted by a lovely black cat who was keeping an eye on the proceedings, though I’m not to sure he’d have been happy to be taken. But we did give away a box of things we no longer needed, and it felt good to have a clear-out. I did though rescue a simple wooden shoe rack from the “to go” pile at the last minute. I thought it had been thrown out when we replaced it in the porch with built-in cubbies but apparently it had only made it as far as the garage. As it hit the “to go” pile, I declared I could think of “a thousand” uses for it here and demanded to keep it. Thankfully John didn’t ask me to list the full thousand but my brain did start ticking away. My first ideas were it being a shoe rack in other places in the house — something that’s especially useful coming into winter where there are invariably muddy boots and shoes near every door. Or there is always stuff in the kitchen to go into the garden – I could put shoes on one shelf and have the other shelf for flower pots and what not. Speaking of the garden & pots, my greenhouse staging is awash with empties at the moment – some extra (albeit small) shelving would be useful in there, and in the spring/summer, it could be useful for holding plants – hopefully the slats would discourage some slugs too. Or I could mount the shelves from the shoe rack onto a wall with strong bracket to make a new potting bench – perhaps with tool hooks underneath . I made a similarly slatted “tray” for drying homemade soap and before we moved here, I used the very shoe rack in question in the “jumpers” part of my wardrobe as an additional shelf (so they all weren’t piled up in one big heap and the slats allowed air circulation). Flipped onto an end and lined with an old pillow case, it could be used as a laundry basket and if it was sturdier, it might make a good bench for children . So that’s about nine alternative ideas – any suggestions for the other 991 reuses? 🙂

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How can I reuse or recycle a wooden shoe rack?

How can I reuse or recycle old glass blocks/glass bricks?

September 24, 2012 by  
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We’ve had an email from Whitney, asking about reuse/recycling ideas for glass blocks (or glass bricks , as they’re also known): We just bought a house and making a lot of renovations. We removed some glass blocks from an old bathroom window and I want to reuse them for something. I love glass blocks and since they didn’t get broken in the renovation process I’d love to do something with them. I’d love to be able to drill holes in them and place lights for outdoor use, but don’t know how to do it. I was also thinking about just placing them around the garden, but am looking for some more innovative ideas. I love the idea of using them in the garden – for bed/path edging for example, or if you have a lot of them, as a privacy screen/divider. I imagine in time the edge seals might become damaged and bugs or greenery may creep inside but that could look pretty cool too 🙂 More creatively, I’ve seen them used effectively as the “legs” on simple tables – panels of glass blocks at each end of the table top, though I’m not sure how it was all fixed together – any ideas? Any other practical or creative suggestions for using them either inside or outside of the house?

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How can I reuse or recycle old glass blocks/glass bricks?

Underground Carbon Capture and Storage Could Cause Devastating Earthquakes

June 20, 2012 by  
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Carbon dioxide storage has long been discussed as a way of offsetting emissions from construction companies and other polluters. However it has also faced severe criticism as being a way for rich firms to essentially ‘pay to pollute’ . Now a team of scientists from Stanford University say that there could be an even more serious side-effect – earthquakes. Read the rest of Underground Carbon Capture and Storage Could Cause Devastating Earthquakes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon capture and storage , carbon capture and storage CCS , CCS facilities , CO2 emissions , co2 storage , earthquakes , Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , stanford university , us emissions

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Underground Carbon Capture and Storage Could Cause Devastating Earthquakes

First Photos of 298 Million Year Old Forest Unveiled

February 23, 2012 by  
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Coal Barrons Confronted By Youth Climate Activists At Hill Hearing

April 14, 2010 by  
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photo via flickr The House Select Committee for Energy Independence and Global Warming held a hearing today to put the coal industry front and center in front of the American people.

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Coal Barrons Confronted By Youth Climate Activists At Hill Hearing

Welcome Back, Bipartisanship – "Cap And Dividend" To Join Climate, Energy Choices

April 14, 2010 by  
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This opinion piece is by Marian Hopkins of Business Roundtable. Recently, President Obama signed into law one of his keystone legislative priorities – health care reform. Now, following months of debate on health care, Congress is beginning to turn its attention in earnest to other pressing issues on the legislative agenda, including climate and energy policy

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Welcome Back, Bipartisanship – "Cap And Dividend" To Join Climate, Energy Choices

Congress Gets a Zero Emissions Electric Bus

October 30, 2009 by  
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Photos via Autoblog Green While Congressmen struggle with climate legislation and clean energy reform, at least they’ll be able to get an emissions-free ride to the proceedings. The Proterra electric bus made its debut on Capitol Hill yesterday, and looks set to deliver zero emission, fast-charging public transportation

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Congress Gets a Zero Emissions Electric Bus

US Plastic More Expensive To Make, Will Have Higher Carbon Footprint Under Cap & Trade

October 30, 2009 by  
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Cleaning up waste plastic before it goes into the ocean. Image credits:: Algalita Marine Research Foundation In Europe they commonly make commodity plastics from oil-based feedstock: petroleum naptha from the refinery. In the USA, however, plastic is mostly is made from natural gas as raw material

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US Plastic More Expensive To Make, Will Have Higher Carbon Footprint Under Cap & Trade

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