Are Your Souvenirs Part of the Problem?

July 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Are Your Souvenirs Part of the Problem?

The couple carrying 16 pounds of ivory confiscated at SeaTac Airport … The post Are Your Souvenirs Part of the Problem? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the original here:
Are Your Souvenirs Part of the Problem?

Mystery of banned CFCs resurgence may be solved

June 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Mystery of banned CFCs resurgence may be solved

The world recently learned that chlorofluorocarbons ( CFCs ), an ozone-damaging industrial gas banned under the 1997 Montreal Protocol, have made an unexpected comeback, with significant emissions detected in the atmosphere. The source of these banned gases has remained unclear. Now, documents and research gathered by the New York Times and independent investigators suggest that the CFCs, specifically CFC-11, may be coming from factories in China that manufacture foam for buildings and appliances. “You had a choice: Choose the cheaper foam agent that’s not so good for the environment, or the expensive one that’s better for the environment,” factory owner Zhang Wenbo told the New York Times . “Of course, we chose the cheaper foam agent. That’s how we survived.” At the time of Zhang’s interview, local authorities were conducting inspections throughout town and citing those who violated regulations. When they arrived at his factory, they assessed that it was in violation of environmental codes and ordered it shut down. “They never told us until last year that it was damaging the atmosphere ,” Zhang said. “Nobody came to check what we were using, so we thought it was O.K.” Although some provinces in China have tightened enforcement of the CFC ban, the chemical still remains available online. “When nobody is watching, they can make some, or when they get an order — an underground order — they can also produce it,” local refrigeration expert Liu Le told the New York Times . “They produce for a while until they’re discovered, and then move on.” Related: Antarctic ozone layer shows “first fingerprints of healing” The U.S.-based Environmental Investigation Agency has determined that at least eight factories in four provinces are still using CFCs to create foam. “The scale of this environmental crime is devastating, with massive potential impact on the climate and the ozone layer,” executive director Alexander von Bismarck said. “We’re hoping for a strong response from a strong environmental agreement.” While the mystery is becoming more clear, there is much more that needs to be done to determine the full extent of the problem. Head of the United Nations Environment Program Erik Solheim said, “Based on the scale of detected emissions there is good reason to believe the problem extends beyond these uncovered cases.” Via New York Times Image via Depositphotos

Here is the original post:
Mystery of banned CFCs resurgence may be solved

Ovie’s ‘Smarterware’ smart food storage aims to help reduce food waste

May 22, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ovie’s ‘Smarterware’ smart food storage aims to help reduce food waste

Around 40 percent of food goes to waste in America yearly, which costs the average family of four about $2,000 a year. Luckily, Chicago startup Ovie has an answer to this problem: Smarterware. Ovie’s Smart Tags, which keep track of food items’ freshness, can be clipped on food, placed on six-cup containers, or attached to bottles or take-out boxes. According to the company, their system essentially transforms any regular refrigerator into a smart fridge, but without the steep price tag — and they’re crowdfunding on Kickstarter right now. Ovie’s Smarterware aims to change how people eat by helping them keep track of their food’s freshness level. Rings around their Smart Tags light up as green, yellow or red to let people know if food is safe, about to spoil, or has gone bad. Using the technology is simple: you just press the button on a Smart Tag, and your food is tagged via Amazon Echo or an app. Related: New refrigerator camera takes aim at food waste The app aims to help users really take advantage of what’s in their fridge, letting them see items they’ve tagged or even search for recipes that will use the tagged ingredients. The app notifies users when the light ring hits yellow and offers recipe suggestions. Ovie also plans to send a personalized recap every month to let users know how they’ve been doing and provide tips based on their consumption trends. Ovie CEO and co-founder Ty Thompson said in a statement, “People don’t want to waste all of this food — it just happens. We’re busy, we invest time and resources to make a great meal, and then we end up throwing away a large amount of food simply because we forget about it. We wanted to help solve this problem by creating a product that would be simple to use and bring a more mindful approach to food storage .” You can snag early bird discounts on Ovie’s Kickstarter , which ends June 21. The company plans to start shipping in early 2019. + Ovie + Ovie Smarterware Kickstarter Images courtesy of Ovie

Here is the original:
Ovie’s ‘Smarterware’ smart food storage aims to help reduce food waste

Yoga pants, fleece jackets and the microplastics dilemma

March 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Yoga pants, fleece jackets and the microplastics dilemma

No clothing brand intended for their synthetic products to be discharged into the environment in the former of tiny bits of plastic. Now that they know, they must step up and tackle the problem.

Go here to read the rest:
Yoga pants, fleece jackets and the microplastics dilemma

Aviation’s evolution: Fuel cells, 3D-printed planes and beyond

March 28, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Aviation’s evolution: Fuel cells, 3D-printed planes and beyond

Companies such as Airbus, Boeing and easyJet rethink air travel’s environmental impacts.

See the rest here:
Aviation’s evolution: Fuel cells, 3D-printed planes and beyond

Should your family give up paper towels?

January 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Should your family give up paper towels?

Paper towels are incredibly handy for cleaning up messes and wrapping leftover food. Unfortunately, buying paper towels isn’t cost-effective or eco-friendly. Over on Inhabitat’s sister site, Inhabitots , is an argument to persuade you and your family to quit using paper towels—even recycled paper towels. From statistics on the paper and pulp industry’s waste and negative effects on the environment to the problem paper towels cause in landfills , the article delves deep into many good points for ditching paper towels.

Read the original here:
Should your family give up paper towels?

Ancient city constructed on a coral reef remains the only one of its kind

January 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ancient city constructed on a coral reef remains the only one of its kind

On the island of Pohnpei, Micronesia rest the remarkable ruins of Nan Madol, the only ancient city ever constructed on top of a coral reef . Referred to as an ” engineering marvel ” by the Smithsonian and nicknamed the “Venice of the Pacific,” this series of over 90 artificial islets could have once housed around 1,000 people. Although the Saudeleur built the city around 1200 AD, it wasn’t until earlier this year Nan Madol was finally named a World Heritage Site . Nan Madol flourished sometime during the 13th to 17th centuries AD as a spiritual and political center for the Saudeleur. Little remains of the intriguing ancient civilization – no art or carvings – other than marvelous ruins atop the coral reef. Oral history says the Saudeleur came to Pohnpei as foreigners in 1100 and ended up ruling the island, with Nan Madol as their dynastic seat. The city also served as a temple for the god the nobility worshiped. Related: Lasers reveal ancient Cambodian cities hidden by jungle near Angkor Wat The Saudeleur utilized columnar basalt, a kind of volcanic rock, to build the impressive city on a foundation of coral – and as the building materials are so heavy, no one has yet figured out how they accomplished the feat. The heaviest pillars weigh around 100,000 pounds. The walls surrounding the island’s largest structure, a royal temple called Nandauwas, are 25 feet high. The enduring stability of the remains is also something of a mystery. According to the National Park Service , “The Pohnpeians, who had neither binding agents like concrete nor modern diving equipment, sank the heavy stones into the lagoon using an unknown method. The building remains and canals are stable enough that even after centuries of abandonment visitors can still tour Nan Madol by boat.” Earlier in 2016, the World Heritage Committee added Nan Madol to both the World Heritage List and the List of World Heritage in Danger, underlining the need to protect the fascinating site from unchecked mangrove growth and waterway siltation. Nan Madol is Micronesia’s first World Heritage Site. Via Smithsonian.com , Metropolitan Museum of Art , and National Park Service Images via Stephanie Batzer on Flickr ( 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ), Stefan Krasowski on Flickr , and Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Read more: 
Ancient city constructed on a coral reef remains the only one of its kind

The top 7 WTF moments in fashion this year

December 31, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The top 7 WTF moments in fashion this year

Has there ever been a year in our lifetime that so many of us have been so eager to kiss good-bye? It seems like there wasn’t a single thing not touched by tragedy: music, art, fashion , (ahem) politics . Check out our roundup of the top 7 WTF moments of 2016 and tell us which was the worst of the worst.

See original here:
The top 7 WTF moments in fashion this year

INFOGRAPHIC: The exciting future of sustainability

July 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on INFOGRAPHIC: The exciting future of sustainability

Modern civilization has been relying on non-sustainable energy sources that pollute the earth. Once we learned the depth of the problem, people from around the globe started coming together to come create solutions for greener energy.  Thanks to these thinkers, we now have some incredible new technologies like smarter batteries  and salt power, and things are only getting more exciting as time goes on. To learn more, checkout this infographic created by Ohio University’s online Master of Engineering Management program. + Ohio University’s online Master of Engineering Management program.

The rest is here: 
INFOGRAPHIC: The exciting future of sustainability

Biodegradable plastics are the ‘enemy of the environment,’ says UN scientist

May 25, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Biodegradable plastics are the ‘enemy of the environment,’ says UN scientist

To combat the massive problem of plastic debris in the world’s oceans, manufacturers developed lightweight plastic products that are supposed to break down rapidly, thus reducing hazards to marine animals. The so-called ‘biodegradable plastics’ aren’t the answer, according to the United Nations’ top environmental scientist, because they don’t behave as promised. Instead, the ‘greener’ plastics contribute to the problem of ocean plastic just as much as other varieties. Previous…

Read more here:
Biodegradable plastics are the ‘enemy of the environment,’ says UN scientist

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1223 access attempts in the last 7 days.