Insane new flying Iron Man suit will be 3D-printed

August 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Insane new flying Iron Man suit will be 3D-printed

Hold onto your seats Marvel fans and tech enthusiasts. Before you know it, a real-life “Iron Man” suit will be on the market — and yes, it can fly. Developed by Richard Browning, the co-founder of start-up company Gravity , the jet engine-powered flying suit was designed to “re-imagine manned flight.” With two engine arm configurations that weigh up to 90 pounds and a temperature threshold of 700°C (1292°F), the highly-anticipated invention will also feature wings. And did we mention it will be 3D-printed? The Gravity jet engine-powered flying suit was unveiled at Comic-Con in San Diego, CA, where Browning dished details to Tested’s Adam Savage. The newest version of the suit is comprised of four arm-loaded thrusters and an additional jet pack that is strapped to the user’s back. As noted above, two engine arm configurations can reach temperatures of 700°C (1292°F). 3D Printing Industry reports that if handled responsibly, the rockets aren’t as dangerous as they first might seem. This is because the heat is quickly dispersed by the air which, in turn, reduces the risk of one’s boots or sneakers catching on fire. Browning explained that the movement of the suit is controlled by a very “intuitive” system. For instance, minor movements of the arms determine the direction and height by altering the jet’s vector. It helps that a DAQRI augmented reality (AR) helmet with a heads-up display is connected. Not only does the AR helmet monitor the suit’s performance, it shows the data of speed and altitude in real-time, eliminating the need to check one’s wrist. Browning flew the suit at Comic-Con, wowing comic fans and technology entrepreneurs . He was reportedly able to fly at a speed up to 45/50 mph. Right now, between seven and eight different versions of the suit are in development; modifications will affect the functionality and appearance of the suit. “We are working on a whole bunch of adaptations with the manufacturer,” said Browning “to make [the engines ] much more fit for what we’re now using them for, because clearly they weren’t designed for this.” Related: Stunning Europe Building facade shows off the beauty of 3D printing in Amsterdam The most exciting part of the next-generation suit is that it will be 3D-printed and will feature temperature proof, one-piece aluminum housing for the thrusters. Because the control modules are in need of improvements, the engine configuration will also be changed. Finally, wings will be added to the suit to change the pattern of flight from vertical to airfoil. I’m quite excited about that, Browning said. “We’ve fully CADed up a beautiful, organic inspired housing, and that’s being 3D printed now.” No further information has yet been obtained about the potential cost or release date of the real-life Iron Man suit. However, in the past, Browning informed interested buyers that a custom-built suit should cost approximately $250,000. + Gravity  Via 3D Printing Industry Images via Gravity  

More:
Insane new flying Iron Man suit will be 3D-printed

MIT’s breakthrough liquid 3D printer creates furniture in vats of goo like Westworld

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on MIT’s breakthrough liquid 3D printer creates furniture in vats of goo like Westworld

Remember those 3D-printed humanoid figures that emerge from white, viscous ooze in HBO’s Westworld ? MIT is doing exactly that – with furniture. They call it Rapid Liquid Printing, and it takes digital manufacturing to a whole new level where printed objects can grow and change on their own. Rapid Liquid Printing forgoes the layered approach and instead injects 3D-printed substances into a vat of gel that provides support as the shape hardens. Essentially, you could print a large piece of furniture into the gel, let it set, and pull it out fully formed in a matter of minutes. Related: MIT’s self-assembling chair is really cool, but totally useless (for now) The process was created in collaboration with Steelcase and MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab, and it can utilize stronger materials than traditional 3D-printing , which is often weak and limited. Although it is only being used in a limited way right now, imagine how it could change the future of 3D-printing. Could our very own Westworld be far behind? + MIT Self Assembly Lab Via Apartment Therapy Images via MIT

More here: 
MIT’s breakthrough liquid 3D printer creates furniture in vats of goo like Westworld

Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

Plastic bottle architecture is fantastic at turning a problem into an eco-friendly opportunity. The amazing EcoARK in Taipei , Taiwan is one such example. Built from 1.5 million recycled plastic bottles, this massive pavilion is surprisingly strong enough to withstand the forces of nature—including fires and earthquakes! Designed by architect Arthur Huang, the nine-story $3 million USD pavilion is powered by solar energy and was built to the mantra of “Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.” Constructed for use as an exhibition hall during the 2010 Taipei International Flora Expo, the EcoARK pavilion continues to spread its message of sustainability for seven years strong. Though Taiwan is home to one of the world’s most respected recycling programs, the country consumes a whopping 4.5 million PET bottles a year. To spread awareness about plastic waste, the Far Eastern Group , one of the world’s largest producers of PET products, commissioned architect and Miniwiz founder Arthur Huang to design and build the eco-friendly EcoARK. As the world’s first building of its kind, EcoARK is an incredible architectural feat. The key to the EcoARK design lay with polli-bricks, a hollow building block made of recycled PET developed by Miniwiz. The polli-bricks were manufactured from over a million recycled plastic bottles melted down into PET pellets and re-engineered into a new bottle-like shape. The blow-molded polli-bricks feature interlocking grooves that fit tightly together like LEGOs and only require a small amount of silicon sealant. Once assembled into flat rectangular panels, the polli-bricks are coated with a fire- and water-resistant film. The EcoARK’s curved and transparent facade is made up of these modular panels screwed and mounted onto a structural steel frame. Although the EcoARK weighs half as much as conventional buildings, it’s resistant to earthquakes and typhoons, and can withstand sustained winds up of to 130 kilometers per hour. Related: Basurama transforms landfill trash into playgrounds in Taipei Use of recycled plastic bottles isn’t the only eco-friendly feature of the EcoARK. The pavilion was built with low-carbon building techniques to maintain a zero-carbon footprint during operation. The building stays cool without air conditioning thanks to natural ventilation. The air inside the polli-bricks also provides insulation from heat and rainwater is collected and reused to cool the building. The polli-bricks’ transparency allows natural light to illuminate the interior during the day. Solar – and wind-powered systems generate the electricity needed to power 40,000 LEDs that light the building up at night. + Miniwiz Images © Lucy Wang

Original post: 
Amazing plastic bottle architecture withstands earthquakes in Taipei

Escape into the glass rivers and lakes of these beautiful wood tables

May 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Escape into the glass rivers and lakes of these beautiful wood tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen, who we’ve featured previously , handcrafts unique pieces that mimic topographic forms in the Pacific Northwest. Spotted by This is Colossal , Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings. “The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen. Related: Amazing Abyss Table Layers Glass and Wood to Mimic the Depths of the Ocean Blue Klassen uses a variety of reclaimed wood including maple, cottonwood, walnut, and sycamore. He uses the wood’s existing edges to inform the shape of waterways hand-cut from tempered blue glass. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and sells for thousands of U.S. dollars. + Greg Klassen Via This is Colossal Images via Greg Klassen

View post: 
Escape into the glass rivers and lakes of these beautiful wood tables

A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours

March 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours

Building a house typically takes months, exacerbating the housing crisis so many people face worldwide. Apis Cor , a San Francisco-based company that specializes in 3D-printing , decided to tackle that crisis with a groundbreaking mobile 3D-printer that can print an entire 400-square-foot tiny home in just 24 hours. What’s more, doing so costs just over $10,000 – a steal compared to most modern homes. On their website, Apis Cor says the construction industry may be sluggish now, but they will persevere in disrupting that industry “until everyone is able to afford a place to live.” Their revolutionary mobile 3D-printer is small enough to be transported, so assembly and transportation costs can be slashed. Although their mobile printer only needs a day to print a home from a concrete mixture, the company says their buildings will last up to 175 years. Not only is their process speedy, but environmentally friendly and affordable too. Related: New 3D house printer cranks out 1,000 square feet a day https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xktwDfasPGQ The Russian house offers a promising beginning. Located at the Apis Cor test facility in Stupino, around 60 miles south of Moscow, the home was printed as a whole rather than assembled with pre-printed pieces. Apis Cor printed components like the building envelope, self-bearing walls, and partitions right on location. Winter couldn’t even stand in the little mobile printer’s way. Apis Cor printed the home last December, which was no big deal for their printer because it can function in temperatures down to negative 31 degrees Fahrenheit. The concrete mixture does require temperatures above 41 degrees Fahrenheit, however, so Apis Cor erected a tent over the tiny house site to plunge forward in cold weather. White decorative plaster finished the tiny home’s exterior, allowing the team to paint it in bright colors. The interior is bright and furnished with modern appliances from Samsung. In total, the house cost $10,134, or around $275 per square foot. + Apis Cor Via Curbed Images via Apis Cor

Original post: 
A 10K tiny house 3D-printed in 24 hours

New 3Doodler Pro pen draws wood, copper, and bronze sculptures in mid-air

September 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New 3Doodler Pro pen draws wood, copper, and bronze sculptures in mid-air

The original 3Doodler came to be after a hugely successful Kickstarter campaign in 2013. Project backers funded $500,000 on the first day and the final total raised was $2.3 million. The Pro model takes the instrument to new heights with its ability to draw with a variety of new materials , including nylon, polycarbonate, and plastic-based composites of wood, bronze, and copper. The composites contain so much of the desired element, the creations can even be sanded or polished. Related: 3Doodler: World’s first ‘3D-printing pen’ lets you draw designs in thin air! The 3Doodler Pro features dials which control speed, temperature, and a fan to help cool projects as you work. An LCD screen displays the temperature, giving artists plenty of control over the details of their creations. The kit includes an additional, portable battery pack and nozzles and highlights the pen’s sleek, new carbon fiber shell. Right now, the 3Doodler is priced at $249 and will be available in select stores, as well as the website. + 3Doodler Pro Via Dezeen Images via Wobbleworks

Here is the original post:
New 3Doodler Pro pen draws wood, copper, and bronze sculptures in mid-air

Egloo launches brilliant electricity-free heater that warms your home for just pennies a day

September 5, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Egloo launches brilliant electricity-free heater that warms your home for just pennies a day

With just four candles, Egloo can heat a room up to 90 square feet in size, which means you can warm up those spaces that just refuse to get toasty. Once you light the candles , Egloo is ready to go in 5 minutes and, after 30 minutes, the space around the heater will climb 10 degrees. It’s the perfect thing for chilly rooms or your patio during the cooler weather. Related: VIDEO: How to make an electricity-free radiant space heater that heats your home for pennies a day The Egloo’s terracotta warms up and retains heat thanks to a few candles placed under the dome. According to the manufacturer, Egloo is composed of four elements: “the base, the grill and the two domes. The base offers a space for the positioning of the candles that, once you light them up, will warm the domes up. There is a metal grill placed on the base, serving as a support for the domes. It makes a space to let the air in, necessary for the combustion of the candles.” The 3D-printed heater comes in a variety of colors and finishes – like matte black, lacquered purple or simple terracotta – and the base model starts at about 50 dollars. + Egloo

Read the original post: 
Egloo launches brilliant electricity-free heater that warms your home for just pennies a day

Worlds first 3D-printing restaurant may serve the future of sustainable food

July 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Worlds first 3D-printing restaurant may serve the future of sustainable food

https://youtu.be/UWOVvSfSjCM ? Although most 3D printers use inedible filaments , like plastic, the byFlow printer creates dishes out of any edible ingredients that can be made into a paste, such as hummus , chocolate mousse, goat cheese, and pizza dough. The paste is inserted into a syringe-like container, where its heated and then pushed out to create a thin layer of food “ink.” Successive layers are printed until a stable three-dimensional structure is achieved. ? “The goal of FOOD INK is to use the universal language of food as an engaging and accessible way to promote awareness about the amazing possibilities of 3D-printing and other promising new technologies,” says the FOOD INK team. The FOOD INK culinary direction will be led by Spanish chef Mateo Blanch of Michelin-starred restaurant La Boscana in Spain, who will 3D print the food live with an international team of chefs and artists. The 3D-printed food will be paired with whole, non-printed foods. While the sculptural dishes may seem gimmicky, 3D-printed food has potential health and sustainability benefits, from nutrient customization to reduction of food waste. Related: Foodini 3D Printer Cooks Up Meals Like the Star Trek Food Replicator ? “Our 3D-printing dinner series serve as a platform for a public conversation about the future of sustainable food, nutrition, and health,” write the founders. “Our events powerfully demonstrate how emerging technologies are rapidly challenging and changing the way we eat, create, share and live.” ? FOOD INK began with a successful opening at the 3D Printing Food Conference in Venlo, the Netherlands. The restaurant will kick off its world tour with a nine-course 3D-printed dinner in London from July 25 to July 27. FOOD INK will travel around the world to cities like Dubai, Seoul, Paris, Las Vegas, Toronto, New York City, Taipei, and more in late 2016. + FOOD INK Via ArchDaily Images via FOOD INK

See the rest here:
Worlds first 3D-printing restaurant may serve the future of sustainable food

Repurposed Sydney brewery boasts a pioneering rooftop power plant

July 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Repurposed Sydney brewery boasts a pioneering rooftop power plant

The project is part of A $2 billion scheme developed by Frasers Property and Sekisui House, which will include shops, a hotel, student housing and a public park . The metallic appearance of the plant contrasts with the existing brewery’s red brick facade. Related: Old slaughterhouse in Madrid is turned into an incubator for creative startups “The built form of the project needed to provide a memorable expression of this important new technology within the urban context while also meeting the demanding technical requirements of the cooling towers and enhancing the heritage significance of the buildings,” the designers said. The design firm added, “This project delivers significant community benefits through both the provision of a highly energy efficient method of supplying power as well as hot and cold water to a significant new mixed-use development on the fringes of the city as well as providing a model of how this new technology can be integrated with an important historic structure.” + Tzannes Via Dezeen Photos by John Gollings

The rest is here: 
Repurposed Sydney brewery boasts a pioneering rooftop power plant

Earth’s atmosphere is leaking 90 tons of material every day

July 11, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Earth’s atmosphere is leaking 90 tons of material every day

Earth has sprung a leak. Every day, 90 metric tons of matter leaks from Earth’s upper atmosphere into space. This sounds scary, but in total the atmosphere weighs about five quadrillion metric tons, so we have a lot of atmosphere to work with. Still, scientists are paying attention to the leak, because it could help us understand what makes a planet habitable.

Go here to read the rest: 
Earth’s atmosphere is leaking 90 tons of material every day

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6398 access attempts in the last 7 days.